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I want to sort some strings of the same size.The size of the string can be very large(10^18). How can i sort all those stings with minimum number of time.The size of the all inputed string will be equal.How can i sort these string with faster time.

922003001020293839297830207344987344973074734
766352786207892397340783784078348747606208602
182823068326283756515117829362376823572395775
//the size of all string is equal

Anyone please explain the better way of sorting.

  • 4
    std::sort – NathanOliver Aug 31 '16 at 16:58
  • are all the numbers the same number of digits? Is so then they will sort fine using a string sort – pm100 Aug 31 '16 at 16:59
  • Possible duplicate? stackoverflow.com/questions/5897319/… – macco Aug 31 '16 at 16:59
  • I dont know how to sort a string.. would you please explain elaborately – Jahirul Islam Monir Aug 31 '16 at 16:59
  • 1
    There is tons of information about this online. do some reasearch, come up with ssomething, and come back if you have problems – NathanOliver Aug 31 '16 at 17:00
1

Here it's done with std::sort from the header algorithm

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <algorithm>
#include <vector>

int main(){

    std::vector<std::string> nums{
        "922003001020293839297830207344987344973074734",
        "766352786207892397340783784078348747606208602",
        "182823068326283756515117829362376823572395775"
    };


    std::cout << "unsorted: " << std::endl;
    for (auto i : nums){
        std::cout << i << std::endl;
    }

    std::sort(nums.begin(), nums.end()); //sort it


    std::cout << "\nsorted: " << std::endl;
    for (auto i : nums){
        std::cout << i << std::endl;
    }

    system("pause");
    return 0;
}

output:

unsorted: 
922003001020293839297830207344987344973074734
766352786207892397340783784078348747606208602
182823068326283756515117829362376823572395775

sorted: 
182823068326283756515117829362376823572395775
766352786207892397340783784078348747606208602
922003001020293839297830207344987344973074734
| improve this answer | |
  • Can u please do it for std::qsort where i will give an input for total number of string – Jahirul Islam Monir Aug 31 '16 at 17:13
  • 1
    why do you want to use std::qsort? std::sort is so simple – Stack Danny Aug 31 '16 at 17:14
  • @JahirulIslamMonir Why do you need to use qsort? If you're programming in C++ then use C++ algorithms instead of old C functions. – Some programmer dude Aug 31 '16 at 17:14
  • Oh, yeah and it's old c style, Like Joachim Pileborg said. – Stack Danny Aug 31 '16 at 17:16
  • @StackDanny Then you might as well tag your question as C. If you are using C++ you should use C++ and not C with Classes – NathanOliver Aug 31 '16 at 17:17
1

It just so happens to be that a string containing only digits is alphabetically sortable, so you just put each string into a vector, and simply sort the vector.

As noted, this only works if the "numbers" all have the same number of digits. Else you need pad the strings with leading zeroes so they are all of the same length. The leading zeroes can then be removed once you have sorted the vector.

| improve this answer | |
  • 4
    That's only the case if they all have the same number of digits. A normal string sort would put "10" before "2". – Benjamin Lindley Aug 31 '16 at 17:01
  • Would it be faster to convert the strings into numbers and store them in a vector, sort and convert them back, or pad? – Fantastic Mr Fox Aug 31 '16 at 17:07
  • It would probably be faster just to compare the lengths first, and then do the lexicographical comparison only if they are the same length. – Benjamin Lindley Aug 31 '16 at 17:09
  • It will be very costly considering my problem time limit. – Jahirul Islam Monir Aug 31 '16 at 17:09
  • 1
    Instead of padding you can use the size first and then the value in a comparison function. – NathanOliver Aug 31 '16 at 17:13

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