5

Say I have a file that contains:

Release 2.1 OS: RHEL File: package_el6_2.0.1.1_x86_64.rpm
Release 2.1 OS: RHEL File: package_el6_2.0.1.1_i686.rpm
Release 2.1 OS: RHEL File: package_el7_2.0.1.1_x86_64.rpm
Release 2.1 OS: RHEL File: package_el7_2.0.1.1_i686.rpm

I want to grep and match lines that only contain 'package', 'el6', and 'x86_64'

How would I go about doing that on a one liner using grep? The line must match all three and grep shouldn't care about how many characters are in between. If there is a better tool for the job, I'm happy to use that instead.

I've tried the following and got no results:

grep package*el6*x86_64*

Seeing posts and documentation, I understand that * does not mean the same thing as it would in shell. I'm looking for the equivalent of it to use in regex. Hope this makes sense.

  • Have you tried anything at all? What is the output of the thing you tried? – Mad Physicist Aug 31 '16 at 19:28
  • @MadPhysicist I have, but I'm having a lot of trouble finding a way to insert a wildcard for any number of characters. Didn't find much googling and reading the man page. – Mike D Aug 31 '16 at 19:31
  • That's fine. Post your attempts and what went wrong here. You are more likely to get constructive help that way. As it stands, your question shows zero effort on your part. – Mad Physicist Aug 31 '16 at 19:43
  • @MadPhysicist grep package*el6*x86_64* Reading through some documentation and posts, I understand that * does not mean the same in regex. But I don't see anything that I can use to replace it with. – Mike D Aug 31 '16 at 19:48
  • 2
    I am not bullying you. I am trying to get you to ask a proper SO question. You are missing key information. I will post an answer as soon as you make the edit. Just move your comment to the question. I'll even upvote it. – Mad Physicist Aug 31 '16 at 19:52
6

Your attempt is very close. * in shell glob terms is roughly equivalent to .* in regex terms. . means "any character" and * is means "repeated any number of times (including zero).

Your regex just needs . before each *. The trailing * is not necessary:

package.*el6.*x86_64

Here is a sample run with your input:

grep 'package.*el6.*x86_64' <<< "Release 2.1 OS: RHEL File: package_el6_2.0.1.1_x86_64.rpm
Release 2.1 OS: RHEL File: package_el6_2.0.1.1_i686.rpm
Release 2.1 OS: RHEL File: package_el7_2.0.1.1_x86_64.rpm
Release 2.1 OS: RHEL File: package_el7_2.0.1.1_i686.rpm"

Prints:

Release 2.1 OS: RHEL File: package_el6_2.0.1.1_x86_64.rpm
  • 2
    Needs more quotes to prevent any possibility of the shell treating that argument as a glob. – Charles Duffy Aug 31 '16 at 19:59
  • 4
    Specifically, it should be: grep 'package.*el6.*x86_64'. Otherwise, the shell can treat the operation as a failure without even running grep (if the failglob option is set), or replace the expression with a list of filenames in the current directory which match the regex when interpreted as a glob, or delete that argument outright (if the nullglob option is set). – Charles Duffy Aug 31 '16 at 20:00
  • Thanks for your help. Exactly what I needed. – Mike D Aug 31 '16 at 20:00
  • @CharlesDuffy. My mistake. Fixed now. – Mad Physicist Aug 31 '16 at 20:00
  • @CharlesDuffy thank you for your contribution as well. I'll be sure to use the quotes. – Mike D Aug 31 '16 at 20:02
2

Not the best solution (in fact ineficient), but really easy to remember: join 3 greps

grep "package" | grep "el6" | grep "x86_64"
  • 1
    If the order of the three elements was not specified up front, this would arguably be the best way to do it. Hence the upvote. – Mad Physicist Aug 31 '16 at 20:02
  • No, if the order isn't guaranteed just use awk instead of a chain of greps with pipes: awk '/package/ && /el6/ && /x86_64/' file.txt – Ed Morton Sep 1 '16 at 3:54
  • Oops, you are right, my answer is not exactly what were asking for – Joan Esteban Sep 1 '16 at 8:30
0

If they're guarenteed to be in order, then a simple grep:

grep "package.*el6.*x86_64" file.txt

would do it. If the items can be in any order, you can try a pipe:

cat file.txt | grep package | grep el6 | grep x86_64

will only show lines containing all three, but in any order

  • grep package file.txt | grep el6 | grep x86_64 is an alternative for the last one. – Mad Physicist Aug 31 '16 at 20:25
  • If the order isn't guaranteed just use awk instead of a chain of greps with pipes: awk '/package/ && /el6/ && /x86_64/' file.txt. – Ed Morton Sep 1 '16 at 3:53
-3

You can use egrep

egrep 'package|el6|x86_64' name_of_file.txt
  • 1
    This matches either, not all three. – Mad Physicist Aug 31 '16 at 19:42
  • Are you trying to find files that have all three strings in it? Something like: grep -l package name_of_file.txt | xargs grep -l e16 | xargs grep -l x86_64 ? – connollyc4 Aug 31 '16 at 20:02
  • 2
    @connollyc4, reread the question -- it's very explicit that all three strings need to be present. – Charles Duffy Aug 31 '16 at 20:11
  • Try it. You can use the command in my answer so you don't have to type from scratch – Mad Physicist Aug 31 '16 at 20:23

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