34

I'm taking a course in Java and we haven't officially learned if statements yet. I was studying and saw this question:

Write a method called pay that accepts two parameters: a real number for a TA's salary, and an integer for the number hours the TA worked this week. The method should return how much money to pay the TA. For example, the call pay(5.50, 6) should return 33.0. The TA should receive "overtime" pay of 1.5 times the normal salary for any hours above 8. For example, the call pay(4.00, 11) should return (4.00 * 8) + (6.00 * 3) or 50.0.

How do you solve this without using if statements? So far I've got this but I'm stuck on regular pay:

public static double pay (double salary, int hours) {

     double pay = 0;

     for (int i = hours; i > 8; i --) {
         pay += (salary * 1.5);
     }
}
5
  • 12
    If you have already learned loops but not if-statements (which is weird btw) you can use for(; condition; ) { …; break; } like if (condition) { … }
    – Bergi
    Commented Sep 1, 2016 at 9:36
  • 6
    @Bergi: right, if this is supposed to be a puzzle with the questioner's hands tied, then that's a good way to untie them within the rules. If it's not supposed to be that kind of puzzle, then without knowing what has been taught I'm a bit stumped figuring out what answer the questioner's teacher is expecting. Hopefully not that. There are some good guesses in the answers :-) Commented Sep 1, 2016 at 10:08
  • 1
    I'm not sure what all the fuss is about not using an if statement. I see the question and think: Why would I use an if, that just makes my code longer/more complicated. When I use if I have to effectively re-create min and max. This type of calculation is what min and max are for. In many situations (e.g. a spreadsheet) those are definitely the preferred solution.
    – Makyen
    Commented Sep 1, 2016 at 15:34
  • 6
    I having a hard time figuring out why anyone would be asking to solve this without explaining if, yet having explained for loops and functions (with arguments). Why not explaining the more basic stuff first? Puzzling.
    – chi
    Commented Sep 1, 2016 at 16:09
  • 3
    Didn't you just miss a lecture? Loops before ifs are sure weird.
    – Kyslik
    Commented Sep 2, 2016 at 1:19

17 Answers 17

82

To avoid direct use of flow control statements like if or while you can use Math.min and Math.max. For this particular problem using a loop would not be efficient either.

They may technically use an if statements or the equivalent, but so do a lot of your other standard library calls you already make:

public static double pay (double salary, int hours) {
     int hoursWorkedRegularTime = Math.min(8, hours);
     int hoursWorkedOverTime = Math.max(0, hours - 8);
     return (hoursWorkedRegularTime * salary) +
            (hoursWorkedOverTime  * (salary * 1.5));
}
8
  • 1
    I like this one. No comparisons at all.
    – zero298
    Commented Aug 31, 2016 at 21:45
  • 9
    @zero298 Except min and max use ternary operators, which do do comparison. Commented Aug 31, 2016 at 21:50
  • 39
    I can't imagine many java courses teach the Math library before if statements. It's valid, but if I was a tutor reading this answer I would be suspicious.
    – js441
    Commented Aug 31, 2016 at 21:55
  • 2
    @newcoder this is why in my answer I just used two for loops. I thought since OP had demonstrated that it was a safe option.
    – js441
    Commented Aug 31, 2016 at 22:12
  • 10
    There are branchless min and max. Commented Sep 1, 2016 at 2:40
53

Since you've used a for loop, here's a solution just using two for loops.

public static double pay (double salary, int hours) {

    double pay = 0;

    for (int i = 0; i < hours && i < 8; i++) {
        pay += salary;
    }
    for (int i = 8; i < hours; i++) {
        pay += (salary * 1.5);
    }

    return pay;
}

This sums the salary for the regular hours up to 8, and then sums the salary for the overtime hours, where the overtime hours are paid at 1.5 * salary.

If there are no overtime hours, the second for loop will not be entered and will have no effect.

7
  • 1
    Maybe i < hours && i < 8 in the first loop and salary * 1.5 in the second would be clearer.
    – Bergi
    Commented Sep 1, 2016 at 9:38
  • 17
    I believe this is actually the answer that the teacher is looking for, tbh, though I think the logic of the teacher is rather dumb bcz all loops use some kind of branching statement in order to exit a loop.
    – Rabbit Guy
    Commented Sep 1, 2016 at 13:15
  • 1
    @rabbitguy I don't think the teacher has set "don't use if statements" as a requirement. The question just says "we haven't officially learned if statements yet" Commented Sep 2, 2016 at 7:56
  • What about fractional hours as shown in the example above? This loop would say a TA that worked 5.5 hours should be paid 36 arbitrary currency. Commented Sep 2, 2016 at 8:19
  • @Phylogenesis hours is specified as an integer, so can't be fractional. Unless the function spec. is changed.
    – js441
    Commented Sep 2, 2016 at 8:21
20

There's a few ways you can go about this, but it's hard to know what's allowed (if you can't even use if).

I would recommend using a while loop:

double pay = 0;
while (hoursWorked > 8) {
    pay += (salary * 1.5);
    hoursWorked--;
}
pay += (hoursWorked * salary);

The reason why this works is it decrements your hoursWorked to a value that is guaranteed to be less than or equal to 8 (assuming hoursWorked and salary are both greater than 0). If hoursWorked <= 8, then it will never enter the while loop.

3
  • 1
    A while loop is basically an if statement, just with a jump back at the end. You could also do: int otherHours = hoursWorked - 8; while(otherHours > 0) { pay += otherHours * salary * 1.5; break; } ... Commented Aug 31, 2016 at 21:33
  • 2
    Everything is essentially syntactic sugar for if in these answers. There isn't one correct answer, but these types of questions are just trying to get you to be creative with other approaches.
    – ihgann
    Commented Aug 31, 2016 at 21:36
  • 1
    I wasn't trying to criticize, just adding to the answer ;). Commented Aug 31, 2016 at 21:37
20
+50

If you really want to get hacky, you could use bitwise operators:

int otherHours = hours - 8;
int multiplier = (~otherHours & 0x80000000) >>> 31;
otherHours *= multiplier;

return otherHours * 0.5 * salary + hours * salary;

So basically, if otherHours is negative, there should be no overpay. We do this by selecting the sign bit of otherHours and shifting it to the least significant bit (with 0 padding) to mean either 1 or 0. After first negating it (if sign bit is 1, multiplier should be 0).

When you multiply this with otherHours it will be 0 in the case there are less than 8 hours, so as not to accidentally subtract any pay, when doing the final calculation.

1
  • 16
    I have a feeling that if the OP cannot use if statements, the teacher might get a bit suspicious if the student suddenly becomes a bit shifting magician :)
    – noobcoder
    Commented Sep 1, 2016 at 22:24
6

Just for the record, here is a solution quite close to where you were stopped :

public static double pay (double salary, int hours) {
     double pay = salary * hours;
     for (int i = hours; i > 8; i --) {
         pay += salary * 0.5;
     }
}
6

You can simply use a ternary operator ?::

 pay = hours*salary + ((hours > 8) ? (hours-8)*salary*0.5 : 0); 

— pay a standard salary for the whole time worked, plus 50% for time above 8 hours (if any).

4
  • 2
    I voted this up, ternary operator is not an IF, an IF is an IF. the teacher never said no comparisons.
    – montelof
    Commented Sep 1, 2016 at 16:23
  • Agreed, any answer to this question is going to be cute to some degree or another, because real code would just use an if.
    – Jason M
    Commented Sep 1, 2016 at 18:28
  • 1
    @JasonM I disagree--the accepted answer using Min and Max is a good way of writing it for those new to coding as it's very descriptive of what's going on--and it has no if. Commented Sep 2, 2016 at 4:54
  • Fair enough, my immediate thought on reading the question title was very similar to the accepted answer. I should rather say that real code that a first year student would come up with would use an if - because that is the most obvious way to distinguish between overtime pay and regular pay.
    – Jason M
    Commented Sep 2, 2016 at 18:13
5

A cast to int can be abused for this purpose.

Note that the function

f(x) = 10/9 - 1/(x+1) = 1 + 1/9 - 1/(x+1)

is between 0 and 1 (exclusive) for 0 <= x < 8 and between 1 and 1.2 for x >= 8. Casting this value to int results 0 for x < 8 and in 1 for x >= 8.

This can be used in the calculation of the result:

public static double pay(double salary, int hours) {
    int overtime = (int)(10d/9d - 1d/(hours+1));
    return salary * (hours + 0.5 * overtime * (hours - 8));
}
4

Here's a way to do it using truncation from integer division, something that you probably have learnt at the start of java courses. Essentially the solution is a one liner that does not need if, loops, comparisons, libraries.

public static double pay(double salary, int hours) {

    //Pay all hours as overtime, and then subtract the extra from the first 8 hours
    double p1 = (hours * 1.5 * salary) - (4 * salary); 

    //In the case where the TA works for less than 8 hours, 
    //subtract all the extra so that ultimately, pay = salary * hours
    double p2 = (hours * 0.5 * salary) - (4 * salary); 

    //When theres no overtime worked, m equals to 1. 
    //When there are overtime hours, m is equals to 0.
    int m = (8 + 7) / (hours + 7);

    //When there are overtime hours, pay is simply equal to p1. 
    //When there are no overtime hours, p2 is subtracted from p1.
    return p1 - m*p2; 
}
1
  • This solution wont work if hours = 0, m will be 2 then Commented Feb 13, 2017 at 20:52
3

A solution which does not use any conditional(implicit or explicit)

Practically, you need to calculate hours * rate but if you have overtime then you need to add a bonus of the form overtime_hours * overtime_rate

in pseudo-code:

//you need to return:
hours * rate + is_overtime * overtime_time * overtime_rate

where

is_overtime = ceiling ( x / (x+1))  # this will be zero when x == 0, in rest 1 
x = integer_division(hours, 8)   # x == 0 if no overtime, in rest a positive integer
overtime_time = hours - 8
overtime_rate = (1.5 - 1) * rate = 0.5 * rate
1
(((hours/8)-1)*8 + hours%8)*salary*0.5 + (hours*salary)
                   overtime*salary*0.5 + (hours*salary)

(((   11/8 -1)*8 +    11%8)*     4*0.5 + (   11*     4) = 50
((      1  -1)*8 +       3)*         2 +             44 = 50
((          0)*8 +       3)*         2 +             44 = 50
((             0 +       3)*         2 +             44 = 50
                                     6 +             44 = 50

So suppose we have (17 hours, 4 salary)

(((17/8)-1)*8 + 17%8)*4*0.5 + 17*4 = 86
(    (2 -1)*8 +    1)*4*0.5 +   68 = 86
           (8 +    1)*2     +   68 = 86
                    9*2     +   68 = 86
                     18     +   68 = 86

17-8=9 is overtime

9*4*1.5 + 8*4 = 9*6 + 32 = 54 + 32 = 86

5
  • 2
    What if hours was more than 15 ? There would be no overpay for at least 8 hours. Commented Aug 31, 2016 at 21:36
  • 1
    This is the only answer that is not using indirect if. For & While both have embedded if condition Commented Aug 31, 2016 at 21:37
  • So, what if hours was less than 8, they would get negative overpay. Commented Aug 31, 2016 at 21:47
  • @JornVernee takes a look on this :-) Commented Aug 31, 2016 at 22:14
  • I can't tell (at a glance) if it works now (btw, I did not downvote), you should explain this answer. Commented Aug 31, 2016 at 22:19
1

You could creatively use a while statement as an if statement

while(hours > 8){
  return ((hours - 8) * salary * 1.5) + (8 * salary);
}
return hours * salary;
0

Plenty of good and more efficient answers already, but here's another simple option using a while loop and the ternary operator:

double pay = 0.0;

while(hours > 0){
    pay += hours > 8 ? wage * 1.5 : wage;
    hours--;
}       
return pay;
0

Using tanh to decide whether the hours are below 8 or not:

public static double pay (double salary, int hours) {
    int decider = (int)(tanh(hours - 8) / 2 + 1);

    double overtimeCompensation = 1.5;
    double result = salary * (hours * (1 - decider) + (8 + (hours - 8) * overtimeCompensation) * decider);
    return result;
}

The decider variable is 0 when hours is less than 8, otherwise 1. The equation basically contains two parts: the first hours * (1 - decider) would be for hours < 8, and (8 + (hours - 8) * overtimeCompensation) * decider for when hours >= 8. If hours < 8, then 1 - decider is 1 and decider is 0, so using the equations first part. And if hours >= 8, 1 - decider is 0 and decider is 1, so the opposite happens, the first part of the equation is 0 and the second is multiplied by 1.

2
  • Not sure how or why this is supposed to work. Care to explain? Commented Sep 2, 2016 at 9:55
  • 1
    @DominicCronin added the explanation :) Commented Sep 2, 2016 at 10:08
0

public static double pay (double salary, int hours) {

    int extra_hours = hours - 8;
    extra_hours = extra_hours > 0 ? extra_hours : 0;


    double extra_salary = (salary * 1.5) * extra_hours;
    double normal_salary = extra_hours > 0 ? salary * 8 : salary * hours;

    return normal_salary + extra_salary;
}
-1

You can use ternary operator.

public static double pay(double salary, int hours){ //get the salary and hours return hours>8?(1.5*hours-4)*salary:hours*salary; }

-2

Some programming languages have explicit pattern-matching features. So for example, in XSLT, a given template will fire if the node being processed matches a given XPATH query better than other templates in your programme.

This kind of "declarative" programming is a level of abstraction higher than what you have in Java, but you still have the switch statement, which gives you the ability to control your flow with a "matching" approach rather than using explicit if-else constructs.

public static double pay (double salary, int hours) {

 double pay = 0;

 for (int i = hours; i > 0;i--){ 
     switch (i){
         case 1:
         case 2:
         case 3: 
         case 4: 
         case 5:
         case 6:
         case 7:            
            pay += (salary);
            break;
         default:
            pay += (salary * 1.5);
            break;
     }
 }
 return pay;
}

Having said that, for your specific example, what you really do need is an if statement. The switch approach will work, but it's a bit contrived.

3
  • 1
    Sheesh... whoever that was with the drive-by downvote... how about some constructive feedback? Commented Sep 2, 2016 at 9:53
  • Another drive-by downvote without an explanation. If there's a problem with my answer, please say so. Commented Sep 4, 2016 at 17:44
  • Yet another drive-by downvote... When will I ever learn why using switch constitutes such a bad answer? Sure - you'd never code it like this - you'd use an if - but as the questioner specifically wants to avoid that, switch is as good as any of the other answers. Commented Sep 19, 2016 at 15:17
-4

In Tsql

DECLARE @amount float = 4.00 , @hrs int = 11

DECLARE @overtime int , @overeight bit

SET @overeight = ((@hrs/8) ^ 1)

SET @overtime = CEILING((@hrs%8) / ((@hrs%8) + 1.0)) * ~@overeight

--SELECT @hrs * @amount

SELECT ((@hrs-(@hrs%8 * ~@overeight)) * @amount) + ( @overtime * (@hrs%8 * (@amount * 1.5)))

(from Valentin above)

3
  • 3
    The question is tagged Java, man... This is not a code golf game Commented Sep 1, 2016 at 22:03
  • 1
    Cool... won't post again.
    – Jason
    Commented Sep 2, 2016 at 14:05
  • @Jason First off, Welcome to SO. Secondly, you can post again just make sure you understand what the question is before posting an answer.
    – matt.
    Commented Sep 2, 2016 at 15:13

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