151

I have a list of strings. Some of them are of the form 123-...456. The variable portion "..." may be:

  • the string "apple" followed by a hyphen, e.g. 123-apple-456
  • the string "banana" followed by a hyphen, e.g. 123-banana-456
  • a blank string, e.g. 123-456 (note there's only one hyphen)

Any word other than "apple" or "banana" is invalid.

For these three cases, I would like to match "apple", "banana", and "", respectively. Note that I never want capture the hyphen, but I always want to match it. If the string is not of the form 123-...456 as described above, then there is no match at all.

How do I write a regular expression to do this? Assume I have a flavor that allows lookahead, lookbehind, lookaround, and non-capturing groups.


The key observation here is that when you have either "apple" or "banana", you must also have the trailing hyphen, but you don't want to match it. And when you're matching the blank string, you must not have the trailing hyphen. A regex that encapsulates this assertion will be the right one, I think.

  • Depends on the regex flavor. Which programming language and/or regex flavor are you using? – BoltClock Oct 13 '10 at 17:52
  • @BoltClock: Added some clarification. Thanks for the feedback. – David Stone Oct 13 '10 at 17:57
  • You want to match everything except for hyphens? – BrunoLM Oct 13 '10 at 18:17
181

The only way not to capture something is using look-around assertions:

(?<=123-)((apple|banana)(?=-456)|(?=456))

Because even with non-capturing groups (?:…) the whole regular expression captures their matched contents. But this regular expression matches only apple or banana if it’s preceded by 123- and followed by -456, or it matches the empty string if it’s preceded by 123- and followed by 456.

|Lookaround  |    Name      |        What it Does                       |
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
|(?=foo)     |   Lookahead  | Asserts that what immediately FOLLOWS the |
|            |              |  current position in the string is foo    |
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
|(?<=foo)    |   Lookbehind | Asserts that what immediately PRECEDES the|
|            |              |  current position in the string is foo    |
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
|(?!foo)     |   Negative   | Asserts that what immediately FOLLOWS the |
|            |   Lookahead  |  current position in the string is NOT foo|
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
|(?<!foo)    |   Negative   | Asserts that what immediately PRECEDES the|
|            |   Lookbehind |  current position in the string is NOT foo|
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
  • 1
    +1 — In this case, you can work around that by using group 1 rather than group 0, but this is an excellent (and subtle!) distinction. – Ben Blank Oct 13 '10 at 18:06
  • @Ben Blank: It definitely depends on how “match” and “capture” are interpreted. – Gumbo Oct 13 '10 at 18:07
  • 7
    Not supported in JavaScript, yay! would be nice to have a JS friendly method, but not bad at all, +0.5 (rounding up ;D ) – GiantCowFilms Mar 27 '15 at 2:37
  • Love look-around assertions! These work great with Ruby as well. – Rots Apr 16 '15 at 8:51
12

Update: Thanks to Germán Rodríguez Herrera!

In javascript try: /123-(apple(?=-)|banana(?=-)|(?!-))-?456/

Remember that the result is in group 1

Debuggex Demo

8

Try:

123-(?:(apple|banana|)-|)456

That will match apple, banana, or a blank string, and following it there will be a 0 or 1 hyphens. I was wrong about not having a need for a capturing group. Silly me.

  • This is not correct since it matches, for example, "123-coconut-456". – David Stone Oct 13 '10 at 17:54
  • Thought you wanted it more general...fixed. – Thomas Oct 13 '10 at 17:55
  • 2
    this will match '123--456' – SilentGhost Oct 13 '10 at 17:56
4

I have modified one of the answers (by @op1ekun):

123-(apple(?=-)|banana(?=-)|(?!-))-?456

The reason is that the answer from @op1ekun also matches "123-apple456", without the hyphen after apple.

2

Try this:

/\d{3}-(?:(apple|banana)-)?\d{3}/
  • 1
    This is not correct since it matches, for example, "123-coconut-456". – David Stone Oct 13 '10 at 17:53
  • @david: how's that different from your "banana" example? – SilentGhost Oct 13 '10 at 17:55
  • @SilentGhost: I only want to capture apple or banana or "". All other values are invalid, as I stated. – David Stone Oct 13 '10 at 17:56
  • sry, in that case: /\d{3}-(?:(apple|banana)-)?\d{3}/ – slosd Oct 13 '10 at 17:57
  • What this example shows is that it is possible to have a non-capturing group without using lookahead and lookbehind. – Vince Panuccio Feb 8 '12 at 7:09
-2

By far the simplest (works for python) is '123-(apple|banana)-?456'.

  • 1
    This would match 123-apple456 so it isn't correct. – Loren Sep 16 '17 at 20:38

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