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Print dict and defaultdict:

>>> d = {'key': 'value'}
>>> print(d)
{'key': 'value'}

>>> dd = defaultdict(lambda: 'value')
>>> dd['key']
'value'
>>> print(dd)
defaultdict(<function <lambda> at 0x7fbd44cb6b70>, {'key': 'value'})

With nested structure it becomes ugly:

>>> nested_d = {'key1': {'key2': {'key3': 'value'}}}
>>> print(nested_d)
{'key1': {'key2': {'key3': 'value'}}}

>>> def factory():
...     return defaultdict(factory)
... 
>>> nested_dd = defaultdict(factory)
>>> nested_dd['key1']['key2']['key3'] = 'value'
>>> print(nested_dd)
defaultdict(<function factory at 0x7fbd44cd4ea0>, {'key1': defaultdict(<function factory at 0x7fbd44cd4ea0>, {'key2': defaultdict(<function factory at 0x7fbd44cd4ea0>, {'key3': 'value'})})})

Were there any reasons for not making it human-readable by default? (UPD: I mean what are the reasons behind not having custom __str__ defined for defaultdict by default?)

  • 1
    @jonrsharpe. It's not only repr in this case, str() has the same output. Might be actually worth it to take this upstream. – dhke Sep 1 '16 at 13:33
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    @DJV: there is no __str__ method, only __repr__; it doesn't matter if str() is called here, as the fallback is used. – Martijn Pieters Sep 1 '16 at 13:33
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    @MartijnPieters I have __str__ in e.g. dir(defaultdict(list)) (on Python 2.7.12). Did I miss something? – dhke Sep 1 '16 at 13:36
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    @MartijnPieters That's quite obvious, yes. But should it? ;) – dhke Sep 1 '16 at 13:37
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    @MartijnPieters Let me formulate this differently: How far is it a POLA violation if a "builtin" type had a different str() and repr() outputs? defaultdict could str() to something more like dict() and repr() to what it has now. But we are far in opinion country, now. – dhke Sep 1 '16 at 13:42
1

repr() output (defaultdict has no __str__, only __repr__) is debugging output. It is not meant to be pretty, it is meant to be functional. It tells you the type, the repr() of the callable that produces the default, and the contents.

From the __repr__ documentation:

This is typically used for debugging, so it is important that the representation is information-rich and unambiguous.

Like all datatypes in Python, (except for strings for obvious reasons), no informal (__str__) is defined because it is up to the programmer to decide what output is suitable for their use-cases. No default can be set for that, because use-cases vary so widely. Output for a file has different needs than output to a GUI or to a web-page for example.

In Python 2, convert the object to a plain dictionary first, then use pprint() if you want 'pretty' output:

def todict(d):
    if not isinstance(d, dict):
        return d
    return {k: todict(v) for k, v in d.items()}

pprint(todict(nested_dd))

In Python 3, pprint supports defaultdict directly:

>>> pprint(nested_dd)
defaultdict(<function factory at 0x105ed2f28>,
            {'key1': defaultdict(<function factory at 0x105ed2f28>,
                                 {'key2': defaultdict(<function factory at 0x105ed2f28>,
                                                      {'key3': 'value'})})})
  • I understand there are workarounds. Question is about why doesnt it print human readable text by default? It wasn't difficult to add __str__ function, right? Were there any reasons for not having __str__? – DJV Sep 1 '16 at 13:38
  • @DJV: there is no human readable version of dictionaries, lists, sets or tuples either. Why would a defaultdict be different? – Martijn Pieters Sep 1 '16 at 13:39
  • @DJV: these are basic data structures. There is no "human-readable" version, because it is up to the program to decide what that means. – Martijn Pieters Sep 1 '16 at 13:39
  • nested dicts seem pretty readable to be, Nested defaultdicts dont. I was just wondering what benefits fo that, as it seemed to me that if defaultdicts were printed as dicts by default it would be cleaner. – DJV Sep 1 '16 at 13:46
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    @DJV: we are going round in circles here. That would loose information, the factory is a crucial piece of data on a defaultdict instance so is included in the repr(), which is meant for debugging purposes and should uniquely identify the object. From the __repr__ documentation: This is typically used for debugging, so it is important that the representation is information-rich and unambiguous. – Martijn Pieters Sep 1 '16 at 13:48
1

There's no way to know what, if anything, the author(s) were thinking or even whether they gave it much consideration at all.

For the specific case of nested defaultdicts, as shown your example code:

def factory():
    return defaultdict(factory)
nested_dd = defaultdict(factory)
nested_dd['key1']['key2']['key3'] = 'value'

You can avoid the issue by subclassing dict like this instead:

class Tree(dict):
    def __missing__(self, key):
        value = self[key] = type(self)()
        return value

nested_dd = Tree()
nested_dd['key1']['key2']['key3'] = 'value'
print(nested_dd) # -> {'key1': {'key2': {'key3': 'value'}}}

Since the subclass doesn't define its own __repr__() or __str__() methods, instances of it will print (and pprint) just like regular dict instances do.

  • # the benefits of defaultdict but still prints like a regular dict class mydict(dict): def __init__(self, func): self.func=func def __missing__(self, key): value = self[key] = self.func() return value – redgiant Dec 14 '16 at 3:02

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