8

Given an API like:

class Bar { ... }
class Foo extends Bar { ... }

In Java's Optional type, we can say:

Optional<Foo> fooOption = ...
fooOption.orElse(aFoo) // returns something of type Foo

But, since Foo is a Bar, I would like to be able to say:

Optional<Foo> fooOption = ...
fooOption.orElse(aBar) // returns something of type Bar

As an exercise, I wanted to accomplish this with another type:

public abstract class Option<T> {
    // this doesn't compile
    public abstract <U super T> U orElse(U other);
}

How would I rewrite this to compile, but also support the ability to widen the type when desired at the same time?

1
  • abstract class Option<T, U> { public abstract <T extends U> U orElse(U other);} ? why would you name a method orElse - this might confuse people that expect Optional.orElse
    – Nir Alfasi
    Sep 1, 2016 at 17:22

4 Answers 4

6

But, since Foo is a Bar

But Bar is not a Foo. What I mean is that you can do this:

Optional<Bar> fooOpt = Optional.of(new Foo());
Bar bar = fooOpt.orElse(new Bar());

But you can't do the same thing with Optional<Foo> because it violates type constraints of Optional.orElse method.

In hypothetical implementation of Option<T> you should explicitly define U as a supertype of T

public class Option<U, T extends U> {
    T value;

    public U orElse(U other) {
        if (value != null) {
            return value;
        }
        return other;
    }
}

In that case you could wrote a code like this

Option<Foo, Bar> fooOpt = Option.of(new Foo());
Bar bar = fooOpt.orElse(new Bar());
6
  • I agree that Bar is not a Foo, but I should be able to provide a Bar value and get a Bar typed reference for either the Foo contained or the Bar I've provided.
    – Scoobie
    Sep 1, 2016 at 18:15
  • I would like to specify the U type implicitly at the time I call the method.
    – Scoobie
    Sep 1, 2016 at 18:15
  • Defining my Optional<Foo> as Optional<Bar> widens the type in all situations, where I only want to widen it in a specific situation.
    – Scoobie
    Sep 1, 2016 at 18:17
  • Rather than Foo and Bar, consider some real classes ... you have an Optional<Integer> oint and you are trying to have oint.orElse(...) return a Number. That Number could be a Long or a Double or a BigDecimal! Or, worse yet, you could hav oint.orElse(...) return an Object in which case it could literally be anything... This doesn't sound like a good idea to me.
    – dcsohl
    Sep 1, 2016 at 18:50
  • @Scooby unfortunately you can't do that because it breaks type bound declaration defined in JLS§4.4. however you can define <U> U orElse(U other) and do runtime type check with unchecked cast. I'll update my answer.
    – vsminkov
    Sep 1, 2016 at 18:53
3

Since U should be the super-type of T, you could do:

public abstract class Option<U, T extends U> {

    public abstract of(T value);

    public abstract U orElse(U other);

}
3

You can define your own method using map to expand the type:

public static <U, T extends U> U orElse(Optional<T> tOpt, U u) {
    return tOpt.<U>map(Function.identity()).orElse(u);
}
4
  • Obviously not. I just wanted to make it reusable. Sep 1, 2016 at 17:55
  • This is not a bad solution, but I'd like it to be a object method, not a static.
    – Scoobie
    Sep 1, 2016 at 18:16
  • @Scoobie that may simply not be possible. Sep 1, 2016 at 18:23
  • @Scoobie The only way would be to write a wrapper class adding this functionality. It does not bring much though. Sep 1, 2016 at 18:44
2

There is a basic premise that is flawed in your question:

In Java's Optional type, we can say:

Optional fooOption = ... fooOption.orElse(aFoo) // returns something of type Foo But, since Foo is a Bar, I would like to be able to say:

Optional fooOption = ... fooOption.orElse(aBar) // returns something of type Bar

A Foo is a Bar, but a Bar is not a Foo. If your Generic is defined as this:

Optional<Foo> fooOption = ...

Then you can return anything that is of type Foo. A Bar is not of type Foo.

If you had an additional object:

class FooBar extends Foo{}

Then you could cast it to a foo in your example:

Optional fooOption = ...

fooOption.orElse(aFooBar) // returns something of type Foo

Or, optionally, if you had defined your Optional as Optional<Bar> then you could use either Foo or Bar or FooBar objects, since they are all of or inherit from type Bar.

As to the second part of your question:

public abstract class Option<T> {
    // this doesn't compile
    public abstract <U super T> U orElse(U other);
}
 

Just by writing this with the common supertype:

public abstract class Option<T> {
    // this now compiles.
    public abstract T orElse(T other);
}

You're saying that anything that is of or inherits from type T is acceptable.

2
  • Your conclusion is right, but it provides the reverse functionality. I want to widen the type. Meaning, I want anything that is of or can be inherited from to produce T.
    – Scoobie
    Sep 1, 2016 at 18:19
  • I think we're saying the same thing. Anything that has a common superclass of T.
    – Kylar
    Sep 1, 2016 at 18:39

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.