1

I have next code

setTimeout(function() {
  setTimeout(function() {
    console.log('foo');
  }, 50);
}, 100);

setTimeout(function() {
  setTimeout(function() {
    console.log('baz');
  }, 100);
}, 50);

The question was what's the output. But on running code I got different results on multiple runs - sometimes it's foo baz, sometime it's baz foo.

So there is two questions:

1) why I have different results?

2) Why sometimes I got baz foo ?

enter image description here

P.S. There is code snippet, but with code snippet I always get the same result P.P.S. If it's environment specific - I use Chrome ( and FF ), but questions still actual P.P.S. Possible answer was about usage console.log, but for

var a = []; 
setTimeout(function() { 
     setTimeout(function() { 
       a.push('foo'); 
      }, 50); 
 }, 100); 
 setTimeout(function() { 
     setTimeout(function() { 
       a.push('baz'); 
     }, 100); 
  }, 50); 
 setTimeout(function() { console.log(a); }, 300);
it's still actual

5
  • 2
    its up to the javascript environment to schedule things appropriately on the backend. both seem to be valid responses Sep 1 '16 at 17:17
  • 2
    setTimeout doesn't schedule things after the EXACT time you specify - its a an approximation that is used by the javascript engine to schedule your functions as close as possible to the time you specify. In general, you shouldn't rely on timeouts to guarantee the order of execution. Read up on the javascript event queue for more info.
    – matmo
    Sep 1 '16 at 17:19
  • @SpencerWieczorek i meant on its backend implementation. Sep 1 '16 at 17:19
  • Could someone post an answer? This is interesting to me, but it's not that useful having an answer as a comment. (I'm looking at you @matmo) Sep 1 '16 at 17:23
  • @matmo I know it, but it doesn't clear why I got different results Sep 1 '16 at 17:24
2

setTimeout doesn't schedule things after the EXACT time you specify - its a an approximation that is used by the javascript engine to schedule your functions as close as possible to the time you specify. In general, you shouldn't rely on timeouts to guarantee the order of execution. Assume that your timeouts can fall within a range of time, and don't expect the specified time to be the exact time that your functions will run.

Read here for more info.

6
  • That's can explain why I got baz foo. But not about different results Sep 1 '16 at 17:27
  • Sometimes the function with baz runs first, and sometimes the function with foo runs first - I'm not sure what you mean.
    – matmo
    Sep 1 '16 at 17:30
  • "It's important to note that the function or code snippet cannot be executed until the thread that called setTimeout() has terminated. Because even though setTimeout was called with a delay of zero, it's placed on a queue and scheduled to run at the next opportunity, not immediately. Currently executing code must complete before functions on the queue are executed, the resulting execution order may not be as expected." Sep 1 '16 at 17:31
  • I run code on empty page. What can browser do beside my code? Sep 1 '16 at 17:32
  • @evolutionxbox please post you comment as answer Sep 1 '16 at 17:32
2

The timeout specified is a minimum time that the browser should wait before executing the function, not a guaranteed time. If the browser is busy doing other things when the timer goes off, the function will be delayed.

So when you schedule the timer for 50 ms, it might not actually run until 53 ms later. Then it will set another timer for 100 ms after that, which is 153 ms after you started. Meanwhile, the timer that's set for 100 ms could run in 101 ms, and then set its second timer for 50 ms later, which is 151 ms after everything started. In this example, it will print foo bar.

Or you could get different delays, and the result would be bar foo.

If you need to perform actions in a specific sequence, you should run them sequentially in a single function, or call the second one from a callback of the first, or use promises in a specific order. Depending on precise millisecond timing with setTimeout is not reliable.

4
  • I run code on empty page. What can browser do beside my code? Sep 1 '16 at 17:31
  • Garbage collection, reacting to mouse motion, other internal processing.
    – Barmar
    Sep 1 '16 at 19:17
  • empty page ( new tab ), and I'm in console -- no garbage, no mouse motions. I just can't keep in mind that logic (. Thx for answer Sep 1 '16 at 19:51
  • Who knows what's going on behind the scenes in the browser?
    – Barmar
    Sep 1 '16 at 19:56
0

Welcome to the world of asynchronous/event driven programming!

One of key things to understand about timers in javascript (and general purpose timing functions in nearly all languages) is that they are not designed to be precise to the tick. What occurs instead is that the program tells the operating system/js engine to "hey, send me a notification when at least this much time has elapsed." The operating system/js engine, however, may have hundreds, thousands, or even millions of tasks it needs to prioritize and execute, so it can't spend all of it's time just watching the clock waiting to fire off that notification. So, to save processing power, keeps all of these timing events in a queue, and only periodically checks to see how much time has gone by and if the events have expired.

In your particular case, you have an timeout event being created as a result of a timeout event being fired. So if the initial event is delayed slightly, that pushes back start time and thus the expiration of the second event. In your foo/baz example, if the initial foo timeout is delayed but the initial baz is not, then the baz callback will be added to the event queue before the foo callback is, and you get "baz foo".

Or sometimes baz will get delayed and foo won't, or sometimes neither will, or sometimes they both will. There's just too much going on under the hood (maybe not even related to your script/code/program) to be able to predict or rely on the exact execution order. That's the takeaway, and it's a good policy to live by for basically all of event driven programming.

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