557

I'm setting up a new server and keep running into this problem.

When I try to log into the MySQL database with the root user, I get the error:

ERROR 1698 (28000): Access denied for user 'root'@'localhost'

It doesn't matter if I connect through the terminal (SSH), through phpMyAdmin or a MySQL client, e.g., Navicat. They all fail.

I looked in the mysql.user table and get the following:

+------------------+-------------------+
| user             | host              |
+------------------+-------------------+
| root             | %                 |
| root             | 127.0.0.1         |
| amavisd          | localhost         |
| debian-sys-maint | localhost         |
| iredadmin        | localhost         |
| iredapd          | localhost         |
| mysql.sys        | localhost         |
| phpmyadmin       | localhost         |
| root             | localhost         |
| roundcube        | localhost         |
| vmail            | localhost         |
| vmailadmin       | localhost         |
| amavisd          | test4.folkmann.it |
| iredadmin        | test4.folkmann.it |
| iredapd          | test4.folkmann.it |
| roundcube        | test4.folkmann.it |
| vmail            | test4.folkmann.it |
| vmailadmin       | test4.folkmann.it |
+------------------+-------------------+

As you can see, user root should have access.

The Server is quite simple, as I have tried to troubleshoot this for a while now.

It's running Ubuntu 16.04.1 LTS (Xenial Xerus) with Apache, MySQL and PHP, so that it can host websites, and iRedMail 0.9.5-1, so that it can host mail.

Log into the MySQL database works fine before I installed iRedMail. I also tried just installing iRedMail, but then root also doesn't work.

How can I fix my MySQL login problem or how can I install iRedMail over an existing MySQL install? And yes, I tried the Installation Tips and I can't find those variables in the configuration files.

3

21 Answers 21

1573

On some systems, like Ubuntu, MySQL is using the Unix auth_socket plugin by default.

Basically it means that: db_users using it, will be "authenticated" by the system user credentials. You can see if your root user is set up like this by doing the following:

sudo mysql -u root # I had to use "sudo" since it was a new installation

mysql> USE mysql;
mysql> SELECT User, Host, plugin FROM mysql.user;

+------------------+-----------------------+
| User             | plugin                |
+------------------+-----------------------+
| root             | auth_socket           |
| mysql.sys        | mysql_native_password |
| debian-sys-maint | mysql_native_password |
+------------------+-----------------------+

As you can see in the query, the root user is using the auth_socket plugin.

There are two ways to solve this:

  1. You can set the root user to use the mysql_native_password plugin
  2. You can create a new db_user with you system_user (recommended)

Option 1:

sudo mysql -u root # I had to use "sudo" since it was a new installation

mysql> USE mysql;
mysql> UPDATE user SET plugin='mysql_native_password' WHERE User='root';
mysql> FLUSH PRIVILEGES;
mysql> exit;

sudo service mysql restart

Option 2: (replace YOUR_SYSTEM_USER with the username you have)

sudo mysql -u root # I had to use "sudo" since it was a new installation

mysql> USE mysql;
mysql> CREATE USER 'YOUR_SYSTEM_USER'@'localhost' IDENTIFIED BY 'YOUR_PASSWD';
mysql> GRANT ALL PRIVILEGES ON *.* TO 'YOUR_SYSTEM_USER'@'localhost';
mysql> UPDATE user SET plugin='auth_socket' WHERE User='YOUR_SYSTEM_USER';
mysql> FLUSH PRIVILEGES;
mysql> exit;

sudo service mysql restart

Remember that if you use option #2 you'll have to connect to MySQL as your system username (mysql -u YOUR_SYSTEM_USER).

Note: On some systems (e.g., Debian 9 (Stretch)) the 'auth_socket' plugin is called 'unix_socket', so the corresponding SQL command should be: UPDATE user SET plugin='unix_socket' WHERE User='YOUR_SYSTEM_USER';

From andy's comment it seems that MySQL 8.x.x updated/replaced the auth_socket for caching_sha2_password. I don't have a system setup with MySQL 8.x.x to test this. However, the steps above should help you to understand the issue. Here's the reply:

One change as of MySQL 8.0.4 is that the new default authentication plugin is 'caching_sha2_password'. The new 'YOUR_SYSTEM_USER' will have this authentication plugin and you can log in from the Bash shell now with "mysql -u YOUR_SYSTEM_USER -p" and provide the password for this user on the prompt. There isn’t any need for the "UPDATE user SET plugin" step.

For the 8.0.4 default authentication plugin update, see MySQL 8.0.4: New Default Authentication Plugin: caching_sha2_password.

29
  • 8
    Option 1 worked for me. But then I also needed to run sudo gedit /etc/phpmyadmin/config.inc.php. Then I did a search for AllowNoPassword and uncommented both lines that contained it. Then I was able to login as root with no password.
    – Joe
    Sep 27, 2017 at 15:46
  • 9
    Option 2 works. I think its always best practice to create a new user and use leaving root to be there!
    – PasinduJay
    Feb 13, 2018 at 6:02
  • 6
    the IDENTIFIED BY '' bit should probably be IDENTIFIED BY 'YOUR_PASSWD'
    – YakovL
    Mar 6, 2018 at 9:56
  • 6
    Finally, an answer that actually works !! There's a zillion answers out there saying do mysqld_safe --skip-grant-tables etc, and it's not been working.
    – Stewart
    May 12, 2018 at 10:20
  • 5
    Ok, how to do this, if sudo mysql -u root -p doesn't let me in?
    – Hrvoje T
    May 28, 2018 at 12:45
325

A new version of MySQL does it this way

In the new MySQL client, if the password is left empty while installing then, it is based on the auth_socket plugin.

The correct way is to log in to MySQL with the sudo privilege.

sudo mysql -u root -p

And then updating the password using:

ALTER USER 'root'@'localhost' IDENTIFIED WITH mysql_native_password BY 'new-password';

Once this is done, stop and start the MySQL server.

sudo service mysql stop
sudo service mysql start

For complete details, you can refer to this link.

5
  • 1
    That worked for my dev server as a quick fix (Ubuntu 18.04 server), however, I do recommend looking into the above-accepted answer, and furthermore, refrain from installing PHPMyAdmin on a production server altogether. Oct 5, 2019 at 22:19
  • 3
    "-p" is not necessary when using "sudo" Nov 30, 2019 at 23:14
  • 3
    wow, this worked for me, mysql Ver 8.0.25-0ubuntu0.20.04.1, #nitipSendal Jun 22, 2021 at 16:00
  • 1
    This has fixed my problem very easily! Thank you Nov 16, 2021 at 10:55
  • @AaronMurray I'm not currently doing it but I'm curious, why is PHPMyAdmin not suitable for production and what would you use as a GUI instead? Or are you saying production servers should have no GUIs? Mar 23 at 23:34
24

No need of sudo

The database is initialised with 2 all-privilege accounts: the first one is "root" which is inaccessible and the second one with your user name (check with command whoami).

To enable access to root account, you need to login with your user name

mysql -u $(whoami)

and manually change password for root

use mysql;
set password for 'root'@'localhost' = password('YOUR_ROOT_PASSWORD_HERE');
flush privileges;
quit

Login as 'root'

mysql -u root -p
3
  • 1
    when i use mysql -u $(whoami) , also it gives ERROR 1045 (28000): Access denied for user 'kaw'@'localhost' (using password: NO) Apr 20, 2021 at 4:30
  • set password for 'root'@'localhost' = password('YOUR_ROOT_PASSWORD_HERE'); This saved my day Oct 11, 2021 at 5:30
  • This looks promising, but I don't think this works at all (like Kaumadie Kariyawasam mentioned). What system, incl. version of the operating system, MySQL, etc. was this tried on? What state was the system in, e.g. wrt. to permissions, users, groups, etc.? Mar 2 at 16:40
14

I was having this issue on an Debian 8 (Jessie) VM that I was interacting with through PuTTY on my Windows 10 desktop.

I tried the various suggestions on here, but nothing quite worked and I am running MariaDB on the Debian host. In the end I found that I couldn't start the database server in safe mode, but I didn't need to and the following commands actually worked for me, i.e., allowing a newly created MySQL user to log into the MySQL/MariaDB server:

sudo service mysql restart
sudo mysql # Logs in automatically into MariaDB
use mysql;
update user set plugin='' where user='your_user_name';
flush privileges;
exit;
sudo service mysql restart # Restarts the MySQL service

If the above doesn't quite work for you, follow the steps outlined in zetacu's post, and then follow my steps.

Now you should be able to use a remote terminal client and securely log into MySQL using the command:

mysql -u your_user_name -p

*Type in the password when prompted

2
  • That simple. Well, only first command does not allowed to execute the second, so I'll adjust it editing - please see if I'm right...
    – kokbira
    Dec 12, 2018 at 16:55
  • 1
    update user set plugin='' where user='your_user_name'; Did worked for me Sep 28, 2021 at 21:37
11

Step 1. sudo mysql -u root -p

Step 2. USE mysql;

Step 3. ALTER USER 'root'@'localhost' IDENTIFIED WITH mysql_native_password BY 'admin';

Here 'admin' is your new password, but you can change it.

Step 4. exit

You are done.

9

After hours of struggling without any solution here, this worked for me. I found a YouTube video where it says the password column is now called authentication_string.

So I was able to change my password as follows:

First get into the MySQL client from the terminal:

sudo mysql

Then inside mysql, type whatever after mysql>:

mysql> use mysql
mysql> update user set authentication_string=PASSWORD("mypass") where user='root';
mysql> flush privileges;
mysql> quit;

At this point you are out of the MySQL client, back to your normal terminal place. You need to restart the MySQL client for this to take effect. For that type, the following:

sudo service mysql restart

Refer to this video link for a better understanding.

8

I would suggest to remove the MySQL connection -

This is for MySQL version 5.5. If your version is different, please change the first line accordingly.

sudo apt-get purge mysql-server mysql-client mysql-common mysql-server-core-5.5 mysql-client-core-5.5
sudo rm -rf /etc/mysql /var/lib/mysql
sudo apt-get autoremove
sudo apt-get autoclean

And install again, but this time set a root password yourself. This will save a lot of effort.

sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install mysql-server
4
  • @ingernet maybe thats because of some other issues which you neglected while installing again
    – Eminem347
    Aug 4, 2017 at 20:21
  • @PJBrunet maybe cause your version of Mysql is different
    – Eminem347
    Sep 22, 2017 at 7:01
  • Fair enough, but an all-purpose solution is best.
    – PJ Brunet
    Sep 22, 2017 at 7:22
  • What do you mean by "remove the MySQL connection"? Remove the installation and remove configuration files? Mar 2 at 15:14
6

There is a good and regularly updated guide on how to set a new password for the latest MySQL:

How To Install MySQL on Ubuntu 20.04

It would be best to read the whole topic from the above page, but in short, this maybe could help.

Run the security script:

sudo mysql_secure_installation

Detailed information for mysql_secure_installation

After that, you can change the password by following the next steps:

sudo mysql

mysql> ALTER USER 'root'@'localhost' IDENTIFIED WITH caching_sha2_password BY 'password';

Detailed information for changing the root user password

If you have a problem, maybe you will need to reinstall MySQL.

2
  • 1
    I type sudo mysql_secure_installation , it asked me enter new password for mysql( ubuntu 20.0 server version)
    – Kuhan
    Oct 7, 2020 at 10:17
  • this work for me , thanks . on ubuntu 20.04
    – kn3l
    Jul 15, 2021 at 12:52
5

I found my solution after hours of research here.

Stop MySQL

sudo service mysql stop

Make MySQL service directory.

sudo mkdir /var/run/mysqld

Give MySQL user permission to write to the service directory.

sudo chown mysql: /var/run/mysqld

Start MySQL manually, without permission checks or networking.

sudo mysqld_safe --skip-grant-tables --skip-networking &

Log in without a password.

mysql -uroot mysql

Update password

UPDATE mysql.user SET authentication_string=PASSWORD('YOURNEWPASSWORD'), plugin='mysql_native_password' WHERE User='root' AND Host='%';
EXIT;

Turn off MySQL.

sudo mysqladmin -S /var/run/mysqld/mysqld.sock shutdown

Start the MySQL service normally.

sudo service mysql start
0
5

I also faced the same issue for the first time.

Now it is fixed:

First, you copy the /etc/mysql/mysql.conf.d/mysqld.cnf file and paste in to /etc/mysql/my.cnf.

You can do it by the command:

sudo cp /etc/mysql/mysql.conf.d/mysqld.cnf /etc/mysql/my.cnf

Now let's reset the password:

Use the following commands in your terminal:

sudo service mysql stop
sudo service mysql start
sudo mysql -u root

Now you are inside the MySQL console.

Then let's write some queries to reset our root password:

USE mysql
update mysql.user set authentication_string=password('newpass') where user='root' and Host ='localhost';
update user set plugin="mysql_native_password";
flush privileges;
quit

Now we can clean /etc/mysql/my.cng.

Open the above file in your editor and remove the whole lines inside the file.

After that let's restart MySQL:

sudo mysql service restart

Now let's use MySQL with the newly created password:

sudo mysql -u root -p

Finally enter your newly created password.

1
  • 1
    Worked Well ! but your answer needs to be updated !! /etc/mysql/my.cnf and not /etc/mysql/my.cng and for service restart its sudo service mysql restart
    – essayoub
    Dec 1, 2019 at 22:51
4

This worked for me:

mysql --user=root mysql
CREATE USER 'some_user'@'%' IDENTIFIED BY 'some_pass';
GRANT ALL PRIVILEGES ON *.* TO 'some_user'@'%' WITH GRANT OPTION;
FLUSH PRIVILEGES;
2
  • Even with the link, an explanation would be in order. E.g., what is the idea/gist, e.g. for the first line? Why didn't the previous answers work? What version of MySQL was used? On what system? In what context? From the Help Center: "...always explain why the solution you're presenting is appropriate and how it works". Please respond by editing (changing) your answer, not here in comments (without "Edit:", "Update:", or similar - the answer should appear as if it was written today). Mar 2 at 16:02
  • You are right @PeterMortensen. I don't know why I posted it at first place. It seems pretty the same as zetacu second option. Please let me know that you read my comment and then I'll just delete my answer.
    – Dorad
    Mar 2 at 18:11
4

In my case,

mysql -u root -p

Enter password:
ERROR 1698 (28000): Access denied for user 'root'@'localhost'

I am sure my password was correct. Otherwise, the error code would be ERROR 1045 (28000): Access denied for user

So I relogin using sudo,

sudo mysql -u root -p

This time it worked for me. See the documentation.

And then change the root password,

mysql> alter user 'root'@'%' identified with mysql_native_password by 'me123';
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.14 sec)

mysql>

Then restart the server using sudo /etc/init.d/mysql restart.

4

For the first

sudo mysql -u root -p

SHOW VARIABLES LIKE 'validate_password%';

we will see something like this:

+--------------------------------------+--------+
| Variable_name                        | Value  |
+--------------------------------------+--------+
| validate_password.check_user_name    | ON     |
| validate_password.dictionary_file    |        |
| validate_password.length             | 8      |
| validate_password.mixed_case_count   | 1      |
| validate_password.number_count       | 1      |
| validate_password.policy             | MEDIUM |
| validate_password.special_char_count | 1      |
+--------------------------------------+--------+

We need to change these rows:

  1. validate_password.length
  2. validate_password.number_count
  3. validate_password.policy
  4. validate_password.special_char_count
SET GLOBAL validate_password.policy=LOW;
SET GLOBAL validate_password.length=4;
SET GLOBAL validate_password.number_count=0;
SET GLOBAL validate_password.special_char_count=0;

SHOW VARIABLES LIKE 'validate_password%';

We will see:

+--------------------------------------+-------+
| Variable_name                        | Value |
+--------------------------------------+-------+
| validate_password.check_user_name    | ON    |
| validate_password.dictionary_file    |       |
| validate_password.length             | 4     |
| validate_password.mixed_case_count   | 1     |
| validate_password.number_count       | 0     |
| validate_password.policy             | LOW   |
| validate_password.special_char_count | 0     |
+--------------------------------------+-------+

Now exit from the MySQL client:

exit;
sudo mysql -u root -p

And now you can write your password, four or more only letters.

ALTER USER 'root'@'localhost' IDENTIFIED WITH mysql_native_password BY 'new-password';

exit;

sudo mysql -u root -p

Your new password is in the database for user 'root';

3

First step: go to file /etc/phpmyadmin/config.inc.php, and then uncomment lines where you find "AllowNoPassword".

Second step: log in to your MySQL default account

mysql -u root -p

use mysql;
update user set plugin="" where user='root';
flush privilege;

And that's all!

2
  • What are the presumptions? That phpMyAdmin is already installed? What context was this tried in? What operating system/distribution/version? Cloud? VPS? Own server? Own workstation? What was installed? For example, folder /etc/phpmyadmin doesn't exist by default on desktop Ubuntu 18.04 (Bionic Beaver), even after Apache, PHP, and MariaDB have been installed. Mar 2 at 16:32
  • Please respond by editing (changing) your question/answer, not here in comments (without "Edit:", "Update:", or similar - the answer should appear as if it was written today). Mar 2 at 16:32
3

OS: Ubuntu 18.04 (Bionic Beaver)

MySQL: 5.7

  1. Add the skip-grant-tables to the end of file mysqld.cnf

  2. Copy the my.cnf file

    sudo cp /etc/mysql/mysql.conf.d/mysqld.cnf /etc/mysql/my.cnf
    
  3. Reset the password

    (base) ➜  ~ sudo service mysql stop
    (base) ➜  ~ sudo service mysql start
    (base) ➜  ~ mysql -uroot
    Welcome to the MySQL monitor.  Commands end with ; or \g.
    Your MySQL connection id is 2
    Server version: 5.7.25-0ubuntu0.18.04.2 (Ubuntu)
    
    Copyright (c) 2000, 2019, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved.
    
    Oracle is a registered trademark of Oracle Corporation and/or its
    affiliates. Other names may be trademarks of their respective
    owners.
    
    Type 'help;' or '\h' for help. Type '\c' to clear the current input statement.
    
    mysql> use mysql
    Reading table information for completion of table and column names
    You can turn off this feature to get a quicker startup with -A
    
    Database changed, 3 warnings
    mysql> update mysql.user set authentication_string=password('newpass') where user='root' and Host ='localhost';
    Query OK, 1 row affected, 1 warning (0.00 sec)
    Rows matched: 1  Changed: 1  Warnings: 1
    
    mysql> update user set plugin="mysql_native_password";
    Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.00 sec)
    Rows matched: 4  Changed: 0  Warnings: 0
    
    mysql>  flush privileges;
    Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.00 sec)
    
    mysql> quit
    Bye
    
  4. Remove the skip-grant-tables from my.cnf

    (base) ➜  ~ sudo emacs /etc/mysql/mysql.conf.d/mysqld.cnf
    (base) ➜  ~ sudo emacs /etc/mysql/my.cnf
    (base) ➜  ~ sudo service mysql restart
    
  5. Open the MySQL client

    (base) ➜  ~ mysql -uroot -ppassword
    mysql: [Warning] Using a password on the command line interface can be insecure.
    Welcome to the MySQL monitor.  Commands end with ; or \g.
    Your MySQL connection id is 3
    Server version: 5.7.25-0ubuntu0.18.04.2 (Ubuntu)
    
    Copyright (c) 2000, 2019, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved.
    
    Oracle is a registered trademark of Oracle Corporation and/or its
    affiliates. Other names may be trademarks of their respective
    owners.
    
    Type 'help;' or '\h' for help. Type '\c' to clear the current input statement.
    
    mysql>
    
  6. Check the password policy

    mysql> select @@validate_password_policy;
    +----------------------------+
    | @@validate_password_policy |
    +----------------------------+
    | MEDIUM                     |
    +----------------------------+
    1 row in set (0.00 sec)
    
    
    mysql> SHOW VARIABLES LIKE 'validate_password%';
    +--------------------------------------+--------+
    | Variable_name                        | Value  |
    +--------------------------------------+--------+
    | validate_password_dictionary_file    |        |
    | validate_password_length             | 8      |
    | validate_password_mixed_case_count   | 1      |
    | validate_password_number_count       | 1      |
    | validate_password_policy             | MEDIUM |
    | validate_password_special_char_count | 1      |
    +--------------------------------------+--------+
    6 rows in set (0.08 sec)!
    
  7. Change the configuration of the validate_password

    mysql> set global validate_password_policy=0;
    Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.05 sec)
    
    mysql> set global validate_password_mixed_case_count=0;
    Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.00 sec)
    
    mysql> set global validate_password_number_count=3;
    Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.00 sec)
    
    mysql> set global validate_password_special_char_count=0;
    Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.00 sec)
    
    mysql> set global validate_password_length=3;
    Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.00 sec)
    
    mysql> SHOW VARIABLES LIKE 'validate_password%';
    +--------------------------------------+-------+
    | Variable_name                        | Value |
    +--------------------------------------+-------+
    | validate_password_dictionary_file    |       |
    | validate_password_length             | 3     |
    | validate_password_mixed_case_count   | 0     |
    | validate_password_number_count       | 3     |
    | validate_password_policy             | LOW   |
    | validate_password_special_char_count | 0     |
    +--------------------------------------+-------+
    6 rows in set (0.00 sec)
    

Note

You should know that you error caused by what? validate_password_policy?

You should have decided to reset the your password to fill the policy or change the policy.

2

This works for me with MySQL version 8.0.26 and Ubuntu 20.04 (Focal Fossa).

sudo mysql -u root

mysql> USE mysql;
mysql> SELECT User, Host, plugin FROM mysql.user;

+------------------+-----------+-----------------------+
| User             | Host      | plugin                |
+------------------+-----------+-----------------------+
| debian-sys-maint | localhost | caching_sha2_password |
| mysql.infoschema | localhost | caching_sha2_password |
| mysql.session    | localhost | caching_sha2_password |
| mysql.sys        | localhost | caching_sha2_password |
| root             | localhost | auth_socket           |
+------------------+-----------+-----------------------+

mysql> UPDATE user SET

plugin='caching_sha2_password' WHERE User='root';

mysql> ALTER USER 'root'@'localhost' IDENTIFIED WITH caching_sha2_password BY 'you_mysql_password';
mysql> FLUSH PRIVILEGES;
mysql> exit;

sudo service mysql restart
1

For those installing the latest MariaDB on macOS and following this tutorial in MariaDB's documentation, run:

sudo mariadb-secure-installation

instead of just the mariadb-secure-installation command given. Otherwise, no luck, despite the erroneous prompt:

In order to log into MariaDB to secure it, we'll need the current
password for the root user. If you've just installed MariaDB, and
haven't set the root password yet, you should just press enter here.

Enter current password for root (enter for none):
ERROR 1698 (28000): Access denied for user 'root'@'localhost'
Enter current password for root (enter for none):
ERROR 1698 (28000): Access denied for user 'root'@'localhost'
Enter current password for root (enter for none):
Aborting!
0

This has happened to me as well. The problem is with the MySQL repository that comes already with the Linux distribution. So when you simply do:

sudo apt install mysql-server

It installs MySQL from their default repository which gives this problem. So to overcome that you need to uninstall that installed MySQL:

sudo apt remove mysql* --purge --auto-remove

Then download the MySQL repository from official MySQL website MySQL APT repository.

Follow their documentation on how to add a repository and install it. This gives no issue.

Also as answered by zetacu, you can verify that the MySQL root user now indeed uses the mysql_native_password plugin.

0

I have done the following steps to get rid of this issue.

Log in into the MySQL in your machine using (sudo mysql -p -u root) and hit the following queries.

  1. CREATE USER 'jack'@'localhost' IDENTIFIED WITH mysql_native_password BY '<>';

  2. GRANT ALL PRIVILEGES ON . TO 'jack'@'localhost';

  3. SELECT user,plugin,host FROM mysql.user WHERE user = 'root';

    +------+-------------+-----------+
    | user | plugin      | host      |
    +------+-------------+-----------+
    | root | auth_socket | localhost |
    +------+-------------+-----------+
    
  4. ALTER USER 'root'@'localhost' IDENTIFIED WITH mysql_native_password BY '<>';

  5. FLUSH PRIVILEGES;

Please try it once if you are still getting the error. I hope this code will help you a lot!!

0

For anyone that tried the solution here and nothing works, make sure you are using the correct command, sudo sudo mysql -u root -p and not mysql mysql -u root -p.

You'll need to enter two passwords, the one of the current user and the root one.

1
  • It is indeed confusing. Is it a system user name or a MySQL user name (or they may be connected somehow)? Can you make it clearer in your answer? E.g., what does "the root one" refer to? (But without "Edit:", "Update:", or similar - the answer should appear as if it was written today.) Mar 2 at 17:27
-1

You want to access MySQL with root user but you're not providing root's correct password.

If you need to set a new password for root, MySQL's site has great documentation on how to do it: B.3.3.2 How to Reset the Root Password

I'll not show the process in here, because MySQL's documentation on the above link is clear and concise.

3
  • 1
    Thanks for the anwser, but I couldn't get it to work, so I have chosen to install iRedMail with a pgSQL database instead.
    – Folkmann
    Sep 2, 2016 at 15:55
  • Roger Folkman! Good to know that you solved your problem any how. Sep 2, 2016 at 16:15
  • 2
    Links break. mysql.com has had many broken links over the years. You should copy and paste the relevant information here, which is fine as long you attribute the source.
    – Goose
    Jan 15, 2018 at 22:31

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.