10

How do you recover from a runtime panic on a "concurrent map read and map write"? The usual defer with recover doesn't seem to work. Why is that?

I know that you are not supposed to use maps in concurrent contexts, but still: how to recover here?

Example:

package main

import "time"

var m = make(map[string]string)

func main() {
    go func() {
        for {
            m["x"] = "foo"
        }
    }()
    go func() {
        for {
            m["x"] = "foo"
        }
    }()

    time.Sleep(1 * time.Second)
}

Please add recovery code. :)

2 Answers 2

28

Recovering doesn't work here because what you experience is not a panicing state.

Go 1.6 added a lightweight concurrent misuse of maps detection to the runtime:

The runtime has added lightweight, best-effort detection of concurrent misuse of maps. As always, if one goroutine is writing to a map, no other goroutine should be reading or writing the map concurrently. If the runtime detects this condition, it prints a diagnosis and crashes the program. The best way to find out more about the problem is to run the program under the race detector, which will more reliably identify the race and give more detail.

What you experience is an intentional crash by the runtime, it's not the result of a panic() call that a recover() call in a deferred function could stop.

There's nothing you can do to stop that except prevent the concurrent misuse of maps. If you would leave your app like that and it wouldn't crash, you could experience mysterious, undefined behavior at runtime.

4
  • What is misleading here is that the stacktrace is pointing to a function called dopanic in "/usr/local/go/src/runtime/panic.go:547": dopanic(0) Sep 2, 2016 at 11:14
  • @IgorLankin Because things are done that are similar to a panic: stack trace is printed, but then the app is crashed. You can see this in panic.go, end of dopanic_m() function: crash() and exit() calls.
    – icza
    Sep 2, 2016 at 11:20
  • any reason that why go decide to make it unrecoverable for "map" concurrent write/read, not for "slice" and other operations like divide 0 and etc ?
    – Tate
    Oct 11, 2023 at 5:36
  • 1
    @Tate Detecting concurrent map writes requires some minimal overhead. Since maps are already pointers to structs under the hood, the additional fields needed to track this could be added to the map structures easily. Slices on the other hand are not pointers but a small, 3-word headers, adding the required fields would be much more significant. Passing maps means passing the pointer under the hood. Passing slices means copying the header, not just a pointer.
    – icza
    Oct 11, 2023 at 6:12
-2

Do not recover, guard your code with mutexes form package sync.

package main

import (
    "sync"
    "time"
)

var m = make(map[string]string)
var l = sync.Mutex{}

func main() {
    go func() {
        for {
            l.Lock()
            m["x"] = "foo"
            l.Unlock()
        }
    }()
    go func() {
        for {
            l.Lock()
            m["x"] = "foo"
            l.Unlock()
        }
    }()

    time.Sleep(1 * time.Second)
}
1
  • 6
    This was not the question. The question was why recover does not work. Sep 2, 2016 at 9:32

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