3

I have the following class:

public class Foo
{
        [Key] 
        public int ID { get; set; }

        [Required]
        [StringLength(100)]
        public string Name { get; set; }

        [Required]
        public float Quantity { get; set; } 
}

and I'm using the following code to update the property Quantity:

  Foo f = new Foo {ID = 2, Quantity = 10}; // Updated object  

  DbSet dbSet = this.Set(f.GetType());
  dbSet.Attach(f);
  var be = Entry(f);
  be.Property("Quantity").IsModified = true;

  DBContext.SaveChanges();

However, the code produces an exception like this:

"The field 'Name' is required"

As far as I know the last piece of code should only update the field Quantity but it is taking into account the field Name as well.

I could avoid this error by taking the object before the update

Foo f = DBContext.Foos.Single<Foo>( x => x.ID == 2);
f.Quantity = 10; 
DBContext.SaveChanges();

but I think that is not a good option because it will spend two database accesses.

Any suggestions will be appreciated.

2

Your code is ok. The only problem is the EF validation process that checks all properties (also the unchanged properties). So, if you set Name, EF will generate a query without Name in SET clause.

I mean, if you run this code

Foo f = new Foo {ID = 2, Quantity = 10, Name = "Don't care"}; // Updated object  

DbSet dbSet = this.Set(f.GetType());
dbSet.Attach(f);
var be = Entry(f);
be.Property("Quantity").IsModified = true;

DBContext.SaveChanges();

EF will run this query

update [Foos]
set [Quantity] = @p0
where ([ID] = @p1)

@p0 = 10
@p1 = 2
2

Option 1

As others have indicated, you could create a stub entity with dummy values for its required properties. However, you seem to have several classes having a Quantity property that you want to update this way. It would be quite a hassle to have to know all required properties of these classes.

I think a better option is to turn off validation altogether, by adding one line:

DBContext.Configuration.ValidateOnSaveEnabled = false;

just before DBContext.SaveChanges();.

I assume you use a context briefly, as recommended, so it won't be necessary to turn validation on again.

Not validating Quantity is safe. It's a non-nullable float so you can't ever set a null value for it inadvertently. But note that when you require other validations [Required], for example a maximum value, you'd have to add these explicitly.

Option 2

A more advanced alternative is to override the context's ShouldValidateEntity method, by making it skip entities having only one modified property named "Quantity":

protected override bool ShouldValidateEntity(DbEntityEntry entityEntry)
{
    if (entityEntry.State == System.Data.Entity.EntityState.Modified)
    {
        var ose = ((IObjectContextAdapter)this).ObjectContext.ObjectStateManager
                     .GetObjectStateEntry(entityEntry.Entity);
        var modifiedProperties = ose.GetModifiedProperties();
        var isValidated = modifiedProperties.Count() == 1 
                       && modifiedProperties.Any(p => p == "Quantity");
        return !isValidated;
    }
    return base.ShouldValidateEntity(entityEntry);
}

If you want, you can make this behavior switchable as well, for example by adding some boolean property to your context.

1
  • I was having the same problem. This works, but I don't know why it fails on validation. I have many entities, and this fails only when I'm trying to change a simple boolean property on one of them, which is irrelevant to any navigation properties, which I've also tried loading them anyway to see if the problem goes away but doesn't. I'd love to see what's going on under the hood. – Can Poyrazoğlu Nov 22 '16 at 14:18
1

Your class contains a Required property, but you not populate this field on the code:

Foo f = new Foo {ID = 2, Quantity = 10};

Replace your code with something like that:

Foo f = new Foo {ID = 2, Name = "Define name of Foo", Quantity = 10};

Notice that the property Name is initialized with a value.

1
  • @guillaumeracicot I agree, that is the easiest solution, but, In that piece of code I do not know the name of class (I think it is a waste of resources to fetched from database), moreover I only want to update the field Quantity – Ayorus Sep 2 '16 at 18:42
0

Although not an EF solution, you can do this very, very easily with Drapper.

You supply Drapper with the update statement you want to execute and it will execute it. E.g.:

public Foo Update(Foo foo)
{
    return _Execute(foo) ? foo : null;
}

Simple. Easy. Fast. No hoop jumping & you have full control.

6
  • I'd like to see the set clause. – bubi Sep 2 '16 at 19:51
  • You determine the set clause as you supply the SQL. Would be along the lines of UPDATE Foo set Quantity = @Quantity WHERE Id = @Id If Foo has properties for Quantity and Id they'll be passed in to your SQL statement automatically. – David Sexton Sep 2 '16 at 20:14
  • If you need to generate a generic update query string with dapper you need to keep two copies of the entity and generate the query only on the changed fields (Your code does not work if you try to update name). This is the entity framework. – bubi Sep 2 '16 at 20:19
  • That's exactly why my solution does work - it's NOT Entity Framework. It's an alternative to EF. – David Sexton Sep 2 '16 at 20:46
  • And in my solution you only need one copy of the instance. Follow the link I posted to Drapper earlier (github.com/sextondjc/Drapper). This solution works. – David Sexton Sep 2 '16 at 20:48
0

It is not necessary to use the entry option. Attach will do the work for you, but it is required to add a dummy Name value in order to pass the EF validations

Foo f = new Foo {ID = 2, Name='-'}; 
DBContext.Foos.Attach(f);
f.Quantity = 10;
DBContext.SaveChanges();

The field Name won't be updated but those properties modified after the Attach(f) method

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