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Consider the following simplified models with nested one-too-many relationship:

public class Report
{
    public Guid ReportId { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public List<Schedule> Schedules { get; set; }
}

public class Schedule
{
    public Guid ScheduleId { get; set; }
    public string Title { get; set; }
    public List<Description> Descriptions { get; set;}

    // FK
    public Guid ReportId { get; set; }
    public Report Report { get; set; }
}

public class Description
{
    public Guid DescriptionId { get; set; }
    public string Content { get; set; }

    // FK
    public Guid ScheduleId { get; set; }
    public Schedule Schedule { get; set; }
}

public class DataContext : DbContext
{
    public DbSet<Report> Reports { get; set; }

    protected override void OnConfiguring(DbContextOptionsBuilder optionsBuilder)
    {
        optionsBuilder.UseSqlite("Filename=mydbname.db");
    }

    protected override void OnModelCreating(ModelBuilder modelBuilder)
    {
        modelBuilder.Entity<Report>()
            .HasMany(report => report.Schedules)
            .WithOne(schedule => schedule.Report);
        modelBuilder.Entity<Schedule>()
            .HasOne(schedule => schedule.Report)
            .WithMany(report => report.Schedules)
            .OnDelete(DeleteBehavior.Cascade);
        modelBuilder.Entity<Description>()
            .HasOne(description => description.Schedule)
            .WithMany(schedule => schedule.Descriptions)
            .OnDelete(DeleteBehavior.Cascade);
    }
}

Adding works as expected, each item is inserted in each table:

Description description = new Description();
description.DescriptionId = Guid.NewGuid();
description.Content = "my content";

Schedule schedule = new Schedule();
schedule.ScheduleId = Guid.NewGuid();
schedule.Title = "my schedule";
schedule.Descriptions = new List<Description>();
schedule.Descriptions.Add(description);

Report report = new Report;
report.ReportId = Guid.NewGuid();
report.Name = "my report";
report.Schedules = new List<Schedule>();
report.Schedules.Add(schedule);

using(var db = new DataContext())
{
    db.Reports.Add(report);
    db.SaveChanges();
}

Deleting entity also works as expected, all items are deleted in each table:

using(var db = new DataContext())
{
    db.Reports.Remove(report);
    db.SaveChanges();
}

However, updating entity only works if I change the content of existing item, not when I adding new item on collection. For example:

// this works
report.Name = "updated report";
report.Schedules.ElementAt(0).Descriptions.ElementAt(0).Content = "updated content";
using(var db = new DataContext())
{
    db.Reports.Update(report);
    db.SaveChanges();
}

// this throws DbUpdateConcurrencyException because no rows are affected.
Description newDescription = new Description();
newDescription.DescriptionId = Guid.NewGuid();
newDescription.Content = "new content";

Schedule newSchedule = new Schedule();
newSchedule.ScheduleId = Guid.NewGuid();
newSchedule.Title = "new schedule";
newSchedule.Descriptions = new List<Description>();
newSchedule.Descriptions.Add(newDescription);

report.Schedules.Add(newSchedule);
using(var db = new DataContext())
{
    db.Reports.Update(report);
    db.SaveChanges();
}

How do I correctly add item to collection and update it afterwards? Is my table design even makes sense? This is how I fetch Report objects:

List<Report> Reports;
using (var db = new DataContext())
    Reports = db.Reports
                    .Include(report => report.Schedules)
                        .ThenInclude(schedule => schedule.Descriptions)
                    .ToList()

EDIT

Just as Sunteen - MSFT post implies, there seems to be nothing wrong with my code. I found out what's causing the problem in my case, which is I am not supposed to deliberately generate each entity's primary key ID (Guid.NewGuid()). As it turns out, the ID is auto-generated and the issue is resolved. Thank you Sunteen - MSFT.

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2 Answers 2

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I cannot reproduce your issue. The only code I wrote is to get the report object which you didn't show in your code snippet. Please ensure the report object you're trying to update is existing in the table. I just got the first record from the Report table and then update, code as follows,

using (var db = new DataContext())
{
    List<Report> Reports;
    Reports = db.Reports.Include(report1 => report1.Schedules)
                        .ThenInclude(schedule => schedule.Descriptions)
                    .ToList();
    var report = Reports[0];

    Description newDescription = new Description();
    newDescription.DescriptionId = Guid.NewGuid();
    newDescription.Content = "new content";

    Schedule newSchedule = new Schedule();
    newSchedule.ScheduleId = Guid.NewGuid();
    newSchedule.Title = "new schedule";
    newSchedule.Descriptions = new List<Description>();
    newSchedule.Descriptions.Add(newDescription);
    report.Schedules.Add(newSchedule);
    db.Reports.Update(report);
    db.SaveChanges();
}

I created a demo with your code and it worked well, and I uploaded the demo to github, you can download for testing and compare with your project to find differences. If it cannot resolved by compare differences, you can try to reproduce your issue on this demo and let us help solve again.

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  • thanks man, that was very nice of you. I'm currently busy with university stuff and will compare your code with mine when available and will get back to you with the result. Thanks again! Sep 7, 2016 at 11:51
  • you're right it works exactly as expected in your code, so there must be something wrong in mine. Thanks for pointing that out! Sep 9, 2016 at 2:25
  • 1
    The main reason this code works but the OP's does not is because you're using the same DbContext for all operations. When you query for an entity then dispose the context, you will lose the change tracker, so your entity is now disconnected. If you update that entity then create a new dbcontext and try to save changes, the context is not aware of the entity in the change tracker, so you'd need to re-attach it to this new context. Mar 16, 2019 at 15:35
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I know this is an older question, but (as the suggested answer proposes), you should use the same DbContext for querying, modifying/creating, and then saving changes.

When you query and get an entity, then dispose the context, your queried entity is now disconnected because you've lost the change tracker that was a part of the original DbContext. If you modify that disconnected entity, then create a new DbContext, you will need to reattach it to the new context before you can save changes, otherwise you will encounter the errors you were having.

EF (especially EF Core) is smart enough to recursively find changes in navigation properties if you call DbSet<T>.Update(T entity) (e.g. db.Reports.Update(report)), and mark those as tracked.

Moral of the Story:

Use a single DbContext for your entire set of related DB operations, starting with a query to retrieve an existing entity (if you're doing updates) or a call to DbSet<T>.Add(T entity) if adding new records. Then finish with a call to DbContext.SaveChanges() before disposing the context.

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