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I'm developing a cross-platform game that will be published and distributed through Steam, and having trouble with the Mac version. Everything is written in C++ and built with Xcode on El Capitan using a project file generated by CMake containing a few minor modifications. After the build is complete, I'm using my own build script to put together the .app package, which generates the directory structure, adds the icon file and the binary, along with an Info.plist file which I've written myself following what documentation I can find on what elements are necessary.

The problem is with backwards compatibility. When I try to launch the game .app on my Mac running Yosemite, I get this error message:

You can't use this version of the application "[my app name]" with this version of OS X. You have OS X 10.10.5. The application requires OS X 10.11 or later.

The thing is, in Xcode I specified the build target as OS X 10.7, so I'm perplexed as to why this error is occurring. I can even go inside the package in Finder, navigate to the actual game binary, and run it without a problem. It only fails with this error message when I double-click the .app file (whose icon shows the circle with the slash, indicating that I probably did something wrong in Info.plists or with the package configuration). Things work perfectly when running on El Capitan.

I also tried setting LSMinimumSystemVersion appropriately, but this doesn't fix the problem.

Here's the content of my Info.plist file:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<!DOCTYPE plist PUBLIC "-//Apple//DTD PLIST 1.0//EN" "http://www.apple.com/DTDs/PropertyList-1.0.dtd">
<plist version="1.0">
<dict>
    <key>CFBundleExecutable</key>
    <string>Contents/MacOS/[binary name]</string>
    <key>CFBundleDisplayName</key>
    <string>[game title]</string>
    <key>CFBundleIconFile</key>
    <string>[icon file]</string>
</dict>
</plist>

I imagine something is missing from Info.plist, but Apple's documentation on required keys isn't helpful as far as figuring out what that might be.

Let me know if you need more info to figure this out, and thanks so much for any help!

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  • 2
    @dorukayhan How is that in any way helpful? I'm trying to build for backwards compatibility.
    – Natman64
    Commented Sep 3, 2016 at 18:58
  • I'm having this same issue, except with a go binary instead of C++. Binary runs fine when executed directly however when executed through the .app package I get the same error (except versions are different). I've tried setting the various version keys in the Info.plist, as well as building a "fat" binary with 386 and amd64 code.
    – Ron E
    Commented Sep 19, 2016 at 13:47
  • Precisely how did you try setting LSMinimumSystemVersion? Also (probably unrelated), CFBundleExecutable should not contain a path, just the name of the executable. It's assumed to be in Contents/MacOS. You should create a new project in Xcode and examine the Info.plist that's created for it. Try adding all of those keys to your Info.plist unless you've verified any given one is unnecessary. Commented Sep 25, 2016 at 16:16

2 Answers 2

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So the problem seems to be clang setting a minimum mac version in the data section of the output binary. The reason the binary executes when run directly vs through the .app is because when run with the .app it's actually LaunchServices executing the binary, and it checks the version number embedded into the binary. Here is an example of assembly output by clang:

    .section    __TEXT,__text,regular,pure_instructions
    .macosx_version_min 10, 12
    .globl  _main
    .align  4, 0x90
_main:                                  ## @main
    .cfi_startproc
## BB#0:
    pushq   %rbp
Ltmp0:
    .cfi_def_cfa_offset 16
Ltmp1:
    .cfi_offset %rbp, -16
    movq    %rsp, %rbp
Ltmp2:
    .cfi_def_cfa_register %rbp
    xorl    %eax, %eax
    movl    $0, -4(%rbp)
    movl    %edi, -8(%rbp)
    movq    %rsi, -16(%rbp)
    popq    %rbp
    retq
    .cfi_endproc


.subsections_via_symbols

Right at the top there ".macosx_version_min" is the problem. To change this embedded version number you simply need to set a compiler flag:

$ gcc -mmacosx-version-min=10.7 -S -o main.S main.c

Now when we look at the output assembly:

    .section    __TEXT,__text,regular,pure_instructions
    .macosx_version_min 10, 7
    .globl  _main
    .align  4, 0x90
_main:                                  ## @main
    .cfi_startproc
## BB#0:
    pushq   %rbp
Ltmp0:
    .cfi_def_cfa_offset 16
Ltmp1:
    .cfi_offset %rbp, -16
    movq    %rsp, %rbp
Ltmp2:
    .cfi_def_cfa_register %rbp
    xorl    %eax, %eax
    movl    $0, -4(%rbp)
    movl    %edi, -8(%rbp)
    movq    %rsi, -16(%rbp)
    popq    %rbp
    retq
    .cfi_endproc


.subsections_via_symbols

Boom, version number fixed.

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  • This is the solution I found after asking in another help forum. I can confirm that it works. :)
    – Natman64
    Commented Sep 26, 2016 at 18:42
  • Where do you find the corresponding section in a binary? I'm trying to patch one but can't find it anywhere in a disassembled binary Commented Mar 24 at 10:59
0

For reference as I just ran into this issue myself:

Do determine which -mmacosx-version-min flag is really used by Xcode, build your project in Xcode, then switch to the Build Report Navigator. Click on the report for the last build and on any entry "Compile xxx.m", then expand the entry.

You'll find the full command used to build that file here along with all command line flags. Press Cmd-F and search for "mmacosx-version-min".

The fix in my case was to explicitly specify a deployment target at the project level build settings. It had the value of "default", which used the current system version.

If you use Frameworks, those might be using the wrong deployment target as well. Same solution worked for me.

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