I've got some third party XML to parse in the following form. The number of tests is unbounded, but always an integer.

<tests>
    <test_1>
        <foo bar="baz" />
    </test_1>

    <test_2>
        <foo bar="baz" />
    </test_2>

    <test_3>
        <foo bar="baz" />
    </test_3>
</tests>

I'm currently parsing this with XPath, but it's a lot of messing around. Is there any way of expressing this style of XML in a XSD schema and generating JAXB classes from it.

As far as I can see this is impossible, the only thing possible is the <xs:any processContents="lax"/> technique from how can I define an xsd file that allows unknown (wildcard) elements? , however this allows any content, not specifically <test_<integer>. I just want to confirm I'm not missing some XSD/JAXB trick?

Note I would have preferred the XML to be structured like this. I may try to convince the third-party to change.

<tests>
    <test id="1">
        <foo bar="baz" />
    </test>

    <test id="2">
        <foo bar="baz" />
    </test>

    <test id="3">
        <foo bar="baz" />
    </test>
</tests>
  • XSD's are centered around a fixed set of elements/types. JAXB simply creates classes from them. How could the number of different elements with the naming scheme "test_xxx" be determined? --- I see an alternative, however: First use an XSLT to change the incoming XML with those elements to one that fits your needs and uses the <test id="xxx"> naming scheme. For that you can easily write an XSD and generate JAXB classes from it. – Seelenvirtuose Sep 4 '16 at 10:50
up vote 1 down vote accepted

While there are ways of dealing with elements with structured names such as numeric suffixes,

you really should fix the underlying XML design (test_1 should be test) instead.

For completeness here is full working example of using XSLT to transform the <test_N> input into <test id="N"> style

<tests>
    <test_1>
        <foo bar="baz" />
    </test_1>
    <test_2>
        <foo bar="baz" />
    </test_2>
    <test_1234>
        <foo bar="baz" />
    </test_1234>
    <other>
        <foo></foo>
    </other>
</tests>

XSL

<?xml version="1.0"?>
<xsl:stylesheet xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform" version="1.0">

    <xsl:template match="@* | node()">
        <xsl:copy>
            <xsl:apply-templates select="@* | node()" />
        </xsl:copy>
    </xsl:template>

    <xsl:template match="*[substring(name(), 1, 5) = 'test_']">
        <xsl:element name="test">
            <xsl:attribute name="id"><xsl:value-of select="substring(name(), 6, string-length(name()) - 5)" /></xsl:attribute>
            <xsl:copy-of select="node()" />
        </xsl:element>
    </xsl:template>

</xsl:stylesheet>

Code

File input = new File("test.xml");
File stylesheet = new File("test.xsl");

StreamSource stylesource = new StreamSource(stylesheet);
Transformer transformer = TransformerFactory.newInstance().newTransformer(stylesource);
StringWriter writer = new StringWriter();
transformer.transform(new StreamSource(input), new StreamResult(writer));

System.out.println(writer);

Output

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<tests>
    <test id="1">
        <foo bar="baz"/>
    </test>

    <test id="2">
        <foo bar="baz"/>
    </test>

    <test id="1234">
        <foo bar="baz"/>
    </test>

    <other>
        <foo/>
    </other>
</tests>

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.