61

I am using the Mux library from Gorilla Web Toolkit along with the bundled Go http server.

The problem is that in my application the HTTP server is only one component and it is required to stop and start at my discretion.

When I call http.ListenAndServe(fmt.Sprintf(":%d", service.Port()), service.router) it blocks and I cannot seem to stop the server from running.

I am aware this has been a problem in the past, is that still the case? Are there any new solutions?

67

Regarding graceful shutdown (introduced in Go 1.8), a bit more concrete example:

package main

import (
    "context"
    "io"
    "log"
    "net/http"
    "time"
)

func startHttpServer() *http.Server {
    srv := &http.Server{Addr: ":8080"}

    http.HandleFunc("/", func(w http.ResponseWriter, r *http.Request) {
        io.WriteString(w, "hello world\n")
    })

    go func() {
        // returns ErrServerClosed on graceful close
        if err := srv.ListenAndServe(); err != http.ErrServerClosed {
            // NOTE: there is a chance that next line won't have time to run,
            // as main() doesn't wait for this goroutine to stop. don't use
            // code with race conditions like these for production. see post
            // comments below on more discussion on how to handle this.
            log.Fatalf("ListenAndServe(): %s", err)
        }
    }()

    // returning reference so caller can call Shutdown()
    return srv
}

func main() {
    log.Printf("main: starting HTTP server")

    srv := startHttpServer()

    log.Printf("main: serving for 10 seconds")

    time.Sleep(10 * time.Second)

    log.Printf("main: stopping HTTP server")

    // now close the server gracefully ("shutdown")
    // timeout could be given with a proper context
    // (in real world you shouldn't use TODO()).
    if err := srv.Shutdown(context.TODO()); err != nil {
        panic(err) // failure/timeout shutting down the server gracefully
    }

    log.Printf("main: done. exiting")
}
  • 1
    Yes, the feature is Shutdown(), whose concrete usage I'm demonstrating here. Thanks, I should've been more clear, I changed the heading to this now: "Regarding graceful shutdown (introduced in Go 1.8), a bit more concrete example:" – joonas.fi Mar 3 '17 at 7:12
  • When I pass nil to srv.Shutdown I get panic: runtime error: invalid memory address or nil pointer dereference. Passing context.Todo() instead works. – Hubro Mar 28 '18 at 17:31
  • 1
    @Hubro that's weird, I just tried this on latest Golang version (1.10), and it ran fine. context.Background() or context.TODO() of course works and if it works for you, good. :) – joonas.fi Mar 29 '18 at 6:47
  • 1
    @newplayer65 there's multiple ways to do that. One way could be to create sync.WaitGroup in main(), call Add(1) on it and pass a pointer to it to startHttpServer() and call defer waitGroup.Done() at start of the goroutine that has a call to the ListenAndServe(). then just call waitGroup.Wait() at end of main() to wait for the goroutine to have finished its job. – joonas.fi Dec 27 '18 at 8:59
  • 1
    @newplayer65 I looked at your code. Using a channel is a good, probably better option than my suggestion. My code was mainly to demonstrate Shutdown() - not showcase production quality code :) P.s. your project's "server gopher" logo is adorbs! :D – joonas.fi Dec 28 '18 at 15:13
34
+50

As mentioned in yo.ian.g's answer. Go 1.8 has included this functionality in the standard lib.

Minimal example for for Go 1.8+:

    server := &http.Server{Addr: ":8080", Handler: handler}

    go func() {
        if err := server.ListenAndServe(); err != nil {
            // handle err
        }
    }()

    // Setting up signal capturing
    stop := make(chan os.Signal, 1)
    signal.Notify(stop, os.Interrupt)

    // Waiting for SIGINT (pkill -2)
    <-stop

    ctx, cancel := context.WithTimeout(context.Background(), 5*time.Second)
    defer cancel()
    if err := server.Shutdown(ctx); err != nil {
        // handle err
    }

Original Answer - Pre Go 1.8 :

Building on Uvelichitel's answer.

You can create your own version of ListenAndServe which returns an io.Closer and does not block.

func ListenAndServeWithClose(addr string, handler http.Handler) (io.Closer,error) {

    var (
        listener  net.Listener
        srvCloser io.Closer
        err       error
    )

    srv := &http.Server{Addr: addr, Handler: handler}

    if addr == "" {
        addr = ":http"
    }

    listener, err = net.Listen("tcp", addr)
    if err != nil {
        return nil, err
    }

    go func() {
        err := srv.Serve(tcpKeepAliveListener{listener.(*net.TCPListener)})
        if err != nil {
            log.Println("HTTP Server Error - ", err)
        }
    }()

    srvCloser = listener
    return srvCloser, nil
}

Full code available here.

The HTTP Server will close with the error accept tcp [::]:8080: use of closed network connection

21

Go 1.8 will include graceful and forceful shutdown, available via Server::Shutdown(context.Context) and Server::Close() respectively.

go func() {
    httpError := srv.ListenAndServe(address, handler)
    if httpError != nil {
        log.Println("While serving HTTP: ", httpError)
    }
}()

srv.Shutdown(context)

The relevant commit can be found here

  • 6
    sorry to be picky, and I know you're code was purely example usage, but as a general rule: go func() { X() }() followed by Y() makes the false assumption to the reader that X() will execute before Y(). Waitgroups etc. ensure timing bugs like this don't bite you when least expected! – colminator Mar 3 '18 at 20:45
19

You can construct net.Listener

l, err := net.Listen("tcp", fmt.Sprintf(":%d", service.Port()))
if err != nil {
    log.Fatal(err)
}

which you can Close()

go func(){
    //...
    l.Close()
}()

and http.Serve() on it

http.Serve(l, service.router)
  • 1
    thanks but that doesn't answer my question. I am asking about http.ListenAndServe for specific reasons. That is how I use GWT MUX library, i'm not sure how to use net.listen for that.. – jim Sep 4 '16 at 20:53
  • 5
    You use http.Serve() instead of http.ListenAndServe() exactly same way with same syntax just with own Listener. http.Serve(net.Listener, gorilla.mux.Router) – Uvelichitel Sep 4 '16 at 21:10
  • Ah great, thanks. I haven't tested yet but should work. – jim Sep 4 '16 at 21:52
  • 1
    Bit late, but we've been using the manners package for this use case. It's a drop-in replacement for the standard http package that allows graceful shutdown (ie. finishes all active requests while declining new ones, then exits). – Kaedys Sep 6 '16 at 21:10
11

Since none of the previous answers say why you can't do it if you use http.ListenAndServe(), I went into the v1.8 http source code and here is what it says:

func ListenAndServe(addr string, handler Handler) error {
    server := &Server{Addr: addr, Handler: handler}
    return server.ListenAndServe()
}

As you can see the http.ListenAndServe function does not return the server variable. This means you cannot get to 'server' to use the Shutdown command. Therefore, you need to create your own 'server' instance instead of using this function for the graceful shutdown to be implemented.

2

You can close the server by closing its context.

type ServeReqs func(ctx context.Context, cfg Config, deps ReqHandlersDependencies) error

var ServeReqsImpl = func(ctx context.Context, cfg Config, deps ReqHandlersDependencies) error {
    http.Handle(pingRoute, decorateHttpRes(pingHandlerImpl(deps.pingRouteResponseMessage), addJsonHeader()))

    server := &http.Server{Addr: fmt.Sprintf(":%d", cfg.port), Handler: nil}

    go func() {
        <-ctx.Done()
        fmt.Println("Shutting down the HTTP server...")
        server.Shutdown(ctx)
    }()

    err := server.ListenAndServeTLS(
        cfg.certificatePemFilePath,
        cfg.certificatePemPrivKeyFilePath,
    )

    // Shutting down the server is not something bad ffs Go...
    if err == http.ErrServerClosed {
        return nil
    }

    return err
}

And whenever you are ready to close it, call:

ctx, closeServer := context.WithCancel(context.Background())
err := ServeReqs(ctx, etc)
closeServer()
  • "Shutting down the server is not something bad ffs Go..." :) – Paul Knopf Nov 9 '18 at 19:43
  • One thing worth noting is that, for a graceful shutdown, before exiting you need to wait for Shutdown to return which doesn't seem to be happening here. – Marcin Bilski Jun 19 at 16:29
  • Your use of ctx to server.Shutdown is incorrect. The context is already cancelled so it will not be shutdown cleanly. You might have well called server.Close for an unclean shutdown. (For a clean shutdown this code would need to be extensively re-worked. – Dave C Aug 8 at 12:15
-2

guys how about this

package gracefull_shutdown_server

import (
    "context"
    "fmt"
    "log"
    "net/http"
    "os"
    "os/signal"
    "time"
)

func startHttpServer() *http.Server {
    mux := http.NewServeMux()
    mux.HandleFunc("/", defaultRoute)
    srv := &http.Server{
        Addr:    ":8080",
        Handler: mux,
    }
    go func() {
        if err := srv.ListenAndServe(); err != http.ErrServerClosed {
            log.Fatalf("ListenAndServe(): %s", err)
        }

    }()
    return srv
}

func defaultRoute(w http.ResponseWriter, r *http.Request) {
    time.Sleep(time.Second * 30)
    w.Write([]byte("it's working"))
}

func MainStartHttpServer() {
    srv := startHttpServer()
    stop := make(chan os.Signal)
    signal.Notify(stop, os.Interrupt)
    select {
    case <-stop:
        fmt.Println("server going to shut down")
        ctx, cancel := context.WithTimeout(context.Background(), time.Second*5)
        defer cancel()
        err := srv.Shutdown(ctx)
        if err != nil {
            fmt.Println(err)
        }
    }
}
  • Why is this better than the accepted answer? – Urosh T. Dec 27 '18 at 15:32
  • i don't say it's better than other. this also working and simple way to gracefully shutdown golang server – Damitha Dayananda Dec 28 '18 at 1:35
-4

What I've done for such cases where the application is just the server and performing no other function is install an http.HandleFunc for a pattern like /shutdown. Something like

http.HandleFunc("/shutdown", func(w http.ResponseWriter, r *http.Request) {
    if <credentials check passes> {
        // - Turn on mechanism to reject incoming requests.
        // - Block until "in-flight" requests complete.
        // - Release resources, both internal and external.
        // - Perform all other cleanup procedures thought necessary
        //   for this to be called a "graceful shutdown".
        fmt.Fprint(w, "Goodbye!\n")
        os.Exit(0)
    }
})

It does not require 1.8. But if 1.8 is available, then that solution can be embedded here instead of the os.Exit(0) call if desirable, I believe.

The code to perform all of that cleanup work is left as an exercise for the reader.

Extra credit if you can say where that cleanup code might be most reasonably be placed, for I would not recommend doing it here, and how this endpoint hit should cause the invocation that code.

More extra credit if you can say where that os.exit(0) call (or whatever process exit you choose to use), given here for illustrative purposes only, would be most reasonably placed.

Yet even more extra credit if you can explain why this mechanism of HTTP server process signaling should be considered above all other such mechanisms thought workable in this case.

  • 3
    Don't think this is good fit for production deployment. :) – Marcin Bilski Dec 2 '17 at 14:09
  • Of course, I answered the question as asked without any further assumptions about the nature of the problem, and in particular, no assumptions about any given production environment. But for my own edification, @MarcinBilski, exactly what requirements would render this solution not a good fit for any environment, production or otherwise? – greg.carter Jun 18 at 15:08
  • 1
    Meant it more tongue-in-cheek than anything because it's clear you wouldn't have a /shutdown handler in a production app. :) Anything goes for internal tooling I guess. That aside, there are ways to gracefully shut down the server so it doesn't suddenly drop connections or crash mid-way through a database transaction or, worse, while writing to disk etc. – Marcin Bilski Jun 19 at 16:25
  • Certainly, it can't be the case that the down voters are unimaginative. It must be that I assume too much imagination. I've updated the response (including the example) to correct my error. – greg.carter Jun 19 at 18:49

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