9

What is the fastest way (in terms of cpu cycles on common modern architecture), to produce a mask with len bits set to 1 starting at position pos:

template <class UIntType>
constexpr T make_mask(std::size_t pos, std::size_t len)
{
    // Body of the function
}

// Call of the function
auto mask = make_mask<uint32_t>(4, 10);
// mask = 00000000 00000000 00111111 11110000 
// (in binary with MSB on the left and LSB on the right)

Plus, is there any compiler intrinsics or BMI function that can help?

  • Does this have to cover the case where len is same as the number of bits of type? That adds extra complications – harold Sep 4 '16 at 21:23
  • It would be better if the function was working for len >= number of bits of UIntType (in this case all bits after pos are set to 1) – Vincent Sep 4 '16 at 21:32
  • if len is equal to or greater than the number of bits of that type then if you use the (1<<len)-1 it still works, all the bits are ones. not the number of bits you want but that is on the user for overflowing anyway, but the one common solution to this still works. – old_timer Sep 4 '16 at 21:54
  • 1
    @dwelch: if int is 32 bit, 1U<<32 is undefined, not 0. See, for example, coliru.stacked-crooked.com/a/ae28ba4070188ace . So if you supply len as 32, with this particular expression of UB, (1<<len)-1 will have all bits 0, not all bits 1. – rici Sep 4 '16 at 22:47
  • 1
    @rici: related: a rotate idiom that avoids UB. val << count on most hardware either saturates the count or takes it modulo the operand width (i.e. looks at only the low 5 bits for a 32-bit shift). This is why you get 0: 1<<32 at runtime is 1 in hardware on x86. Compile-time behaviour may differ, because this is pretty much bogus undefined behaviour. – Peter Cordes Sep 5 '16 at 10:48
5

If by "starting at pos", you mean that the lowest-order bit of the mask is at the position corresponding with 2pos (as in your example):

((UIntType(1) << len) - UIntType(1)) << pos

If it is possible that len is ≥ the number of bits in UIntType, avoid Undefined Behaviour with a test:

(((len < std::numeric_limits<UIntType>::digits)
     ? UIntType(1)<<len
     : 0) - UIntType(1)) << pos

(If it is also possible that pos is ≥ std::numeric_limits<UIntType>::digits, you'll need another ternary op test.)

You could also use:

(UIntType(1)<<(len>>1)<<((len+1)>>1) - UIntType(1)) << pos

which avoids the ternary op at the cost of three extra shift operators; I doubt whether it would be faster but careful benchmarking would be necessary to know for sure.

7

Fastest way? I'd use something like this:

template <class T>
constexpr T make_mask(std::size_t pos, std::size_t len)
{
  return ((static_cast<T>(1) << len)-1) << pos;
}
  • 1
    Minor suggestion: changing (T)1 to static_cast<T>(1) will make the parentheses a little less LISP-like, and might be easier to read. (Personally, I'd use the static_cast, but the C-style cast is okay here, too). – Pete Becker Sep 4 '16 at 21:36
  • I put this on the Godbolt compiler explorer. This answer compiles to really efficient code; looks better than starting with -1LL and shifting that. BMI2's shlx instruction makes this really efficient (since it's much faster than regular shl on Intel Haswell/BDW/Skylake, although even regular variable-count shl r32, cl is only 2 cycle latency (and 3 uops)) (See stackoverflow.com/tags/x86/info, and agner.org/optimize) – Peter Cordes Sep 5 '16 at 11:08
  • If len can be 32 (or whatever the type width) but not 0, then you should start with static_cast<T>(-1LL) and right+left shift that. If len can be 0 but not 32, this answer is ideal. If len can be 0 or 32, and you need both to work, you need something fancier than either of those solutions. :( Jean-Baptiste's lookup-table could work, if you're sure len doesn't need a range-check. (It needs LUT 33 entries, from 0 to 0xFFFFFFFF) – Peter Cordes Sep 5 '16 at 11:17
4

Maybe using a table? For type uint32_t you can write:

static uint32_t masks[] = { 0x0, 0x1, 0x3, 0x7, 0xf, 0x1f, 0x3f...}; // only 32 such masks
return masks[len] << pos;

Whatever is the int type the number of masks is not so huge and the table can be easily generated by templates.

For BMI, maybe using BZHI? Starting from all bits set, BZHI with value 32-len and then shift by pos.

  • +1. BZHI is likely to be fastest, as you don't need a memory access to your table, but assuming this is happening in a tight loop (and if it isn't, why optimize it?) the table access is probably almost as good. – Periata Breatta Sep 5 '16 at 2:30
  • Even a full bidimensional table with (pos, len) indexes is thinkable, 64²=4096 entries (of which half are useless, unless you want to play with triangular indexing). – Yves Daoust Sep 5 '16 at 7:53
  • @YvesDaoust: that sounds like a terrible idea. It would be unlikely to stay hot in L1. Even doing part of it with a table lookup sounds dicey unless your code has so much instruction-level parallelism that fewer uops at the cost of more latency is valuable. L1 load-use latency is ~4 cycles on recent Intel CPUs, but I think KIIV's function could have the (1<<len) - 1 computed in fewer cycles than that, and even the 2nd shift as well. (Based on Agner Fog's insn tables.) – Peter Cordes Sep 5 '16 at 8:12
  • @PeterCordes: I know, but the question is about fixed len/pos values so you can expect that the same value is reused ever and ever. Anyway all this discussion is unnecessary, see my answer. – Yves Daoust Sep 5 '16 at 8:17
  • @YvesDaoust: yeah, I saw your answer and upvoted it. I'm assuming the other answers are trying to be useful for the case where len/pos aren't compile-time constants, assuming that the OP just used constants to simplify the example. – Peter Cordes Sep 5 '16 at 8:26
3

Speed is irrelevant here as the expression is constant, hence precomputed by the optimizer and in all likelyhood used as an immediate operand. Whatever you use, it will cost you 0 cycle.

1

The biggest issue here is the range of possible inputs. In C, shifts with a count larger than the type width are Undefined Behaviour. However, it looks like len can meaningfully range from 0 to the type width. e.g. 33 different lengths for uint32_t. With pos=0, we get masks from 0 to 0xFFFFFFFF. (I'm just going to assume 32-bit in English and asm for clarity, but use generic C++).

If we can exclude either end of that range as possible inputs, then there are only 32 possible lengths, and we can use a left or right shift as a building block. (Use an assert() to verify the input range in debug builds.)


I put several versions (from other answers) of the function on the Godbolt compiler explorer with some macros to compile them with constant len, constant pos, or both inputs variable. Some do better than others. KIIV's looks good for the range it's valid for (len=0..31, pos=0..31).

This version works for len=1..32, and pos=0..31. It generates slightly worse x86-64 asm than KIIV's, so use KIIV's if it works without extra checks.

// right-shift a register of all-ones, then shift it into position.
// works for len=1..32 and pos=0..31
template <class T>
constexpr T make_mask_PJC(std::size_t pos, std::size_t len)
{
//  T all_ones = -1LL;
//  unsigned typebits = sizeof(T)*CHAR_BIT;  // std::numeric_limits<T>::digits
//  T len_ones = all_ones >> (typebits - len);
//  return len_ones << pos

  static_assert(std::numeric_limits<T>::radix == 2, "T isn't an integer type");
  return static_cast<T>(-1LL) >> (std::numeric_limits<T>::digits - len) << pos;  // pre-C++14 constexpr needs it all in one statement
}

// Same idea, but mask the shift count the same way x86 shift instructions do, so the compiler can do it for free.
// Doesn't always compile to ideal code with SHRX (BMI2), maybe gcc only knows about letting the shift instruction do the masking for the older SHR / SHL instructions
uint32_t make_mask_PJC_noUB(std::size_t pos, std::size_t len)
{
  using T=uint32_t;

  static_assert(std::numeric_limits<T>::radix == 2, "T isn't an integer type");

  T all_ones = -1LL;
  unsigned typebits = std::numeric_limits<T>::digits;
  T len_ones = all_ones >> ( (typebits - len) & (typebits-1));     // the AND optimizes away
  return len_ones << (pos & (typebits-1));

//  return static_cast<T>(-1LL) >> (std::numeric_limits<T>::digits - len) << pos;  // pre-C++14 constexpr needs it all in one statement
}

If len can be anything in [0..32], I don't have any great ideas for efficient branchless code. Perhaps branching is the way to go.

uint32_t make_mask_fullrange(std::size_t pos, std::size_t len)
{
  using T=uint32_t;

  static_assert(std::numeric_limits<T>::radix == 2, "T isn't an integer type");

  T all_ones = -1LL;
  unsigned typebits = std::numeric_limits<T>::digits;
  //T len_ones = all_ones >> ( (typebits - len) & (typebits-1));
  T len_ones = len==0 ? 0 : all_ones >> ( (typebits - len) & (typebits-1));
  return len_ones << (pos & (typebits-1));

//  return static_cast<T>(-1LL) >> (std::numeric_limits<T>::digits - len) << pos;  // pre-C++14 constexpr needs it all in one statement
}

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.