49

Usually we do something like a for or while loop with a counter:

for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
{
    list.Add(GetRandomItem());
}

but sometimes you mix up with boundaries. You could use a while loop instead, but if you make a mistake this loop is infinite...

In Perl for example I would use the more obvious

for(1..10){
    list->add(getRandomItem());
}

Is there something like "doitXtimes(10){...}"?

62

Well you can easily write your own extension method:

public static void Times(this int count, Action action)
{
    for (int i = 0; i < count; i++)
    {
        action();
    }
}

Then you can write:

10.Times(() => list.Add(GetRandomItem()));

I'm not sure I'd actually suggest that you do that, but it's an option. I don't believe there's anything like that in the framework, although you can use Enumerable.Range or Enumerable.Repeat to create a lazy sequence of an appropriate length, which can be useful in some situations.


As of C# 6, you can still access a static method conveniently without creating an extension method, using a using static directive to import it. For example:

// Normally in a namespace, of course.
public class LoopUtilities
{
    public static void Repeat(int count, Action action)
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < count; i++)
        {
            action();
        }
    }
}

Then when you want to use it:

using static LoopUtilities;

// Class declaration etc, then:
Repeat(5, () => Console.WriteLine("Hello."));
  • 4
    Would be nice to have some syntax for that without the extra "() =>" =) – Max Galkin Oct 14 '10 at 11:03
  • 3
    @Yacoder: No, it wouldn’t, because then the meaning of the code would be ambiguous. – Timwi Oct 14 '10 at 11:08
  • 1
    @Timwi: I think Yacoder means a completely different syntax, maybe using blocks as in Ruby for instance. Not just writing 10.Times(list.Add(GetRandomItem()));, which indeed would be very annoying and ambiguous (for both humans and compilers). – haylem Oct 14 '10 at 11:14
  • 1
    @Grozz: Why? I don't know about you, but I certainly find i++ more readable, and I would expect them to be entirely equivalent in performance... – Jon Skeet Sep 3 '16 at 12:23
  • 4
    I suggest meeting in the middle with the following compromise: +i+. The operation would increment half the value before the operation and half after the operation. This way, both parties can be satisfied. – Greg Feb 22 '17 at 19:39
40
foreach (var i in Enumerable.Range(0, N))
{
    // do something
}
  • 1
    This version is nice, when you need the index. – mbx Oct 14 '10 at 13:14
  • 1
    Succinct and works - the index can always be ignored if it's not needed – Christopher J Smith Jun 26 '14 at 19:58
  • 2
    This is the one I'm going with, since it provides a succinct but clear way to do the iteration. I feel like it's way more compact than Paul's answer, although they're really the same solution. – KGVT Aug 31 '16 at 20:40
  • @KGVT - I agree with you. What makes this pleasing is not its "compactness", which is not that different than the original code or Paul's, but its "readability". Its "declarative" like Paul's, but in a more familiar layout. – ToolmakerSteve Dec 22 '17 at 1:07
  • If you don't need the counter (i), C# 7 now allows you to use discards: foreach (var _ in Enumerable.Range(0, N)) – Gabriel Luci Jan 31 at 18:44
33

One can create an IEnumerable of Int32:

Enumerable.Range(0, 10);

The ForEach extension method is also widely known (although not shipped with .NET). You could combine the two:

Enumerable.Range(0, 10).ForEach(index => ...);

So your example would become:

Enumerable.Range(0, 10).ForEach(_ => list.Add(GetRandomItem()));
  • Although this works, it's not quite handy. – mbx Oct 14 '10 at 13:12
  • @mbx: Yes, Jon Skeet's Times method is much better when the index is not required and you just want to repeat an operation. – Paul Ruane Oct 14 '10 at 13:16
11

I see Jon Skeet beat me to it, but this variation will allow you to pass the index to the Action each time it is run:

public static class IntegerExtensions
{
  public static void TimesWithIndex(this int count, Action<int> action)
  {
     for (int i = 0; i < count; i++)
        action(i);
  }
}

And call it like this:

10.TimesWithIndex((i) =>
            obj[i].DoSomething());
3

Example 1

            var loop = new Loop(50);
            foreach(var index loop) {
                // do something
            }

Example 2

            foreach(var index in 50.Times().Start(1).Step(-1)) {
                // do something
            }

Example 3

            var loop = 20.Times();
            while (loop.Do) {
                // do something
            }

Loop class & extension

public class Loop : IEnumerable<int> {

    readonly int times = 0;
    int start = 0;
    int step = 1;
    IEnumerator<int> e;

    public Loop (int times, int start = 0, int step = 1) {
        this.times = times < 0? 0-times : times;
        this.start = start;
        this.step = step;
    }

    public Loop Start(int value) {
        this.start = value;
        return this;
    }

    public Loop Step(int value) {
        this.step = value;
        return this;
    }

    public bool Do {
        get {
            if (this.e.IsNull()) {
                this.e = this.GetEnumerator();
            }
            if (this.e.MoveNext()) {
                return true;
            }
            else {
                this.e.Dispose();
                this.e = null;
                return false;
            }
        }
    }

    IEnumerator IEnumerable.GetEnumerator() {
        return this.GetEnumerator();
    }
    public IEnumerator<int> GetEnumerator() {
        int count = times;
        int value = start;
        while (count != 0) {
            yield return value;
            try {
                value += step;
            }
            catch (OverflowException) {
                break;
            }
            --count;
        }
        yield break;
    }
}

public static class IntLoopExtension {

    public static Loop Times (this int self) {
        return new Loop (self);
    }

}
2

There's still one way missing:

List<T> list = System.Linq.Enumerable.Range(0, 10).Select(_ => GetRandomItem()).ToList();

Where T is the type returned by GetRandomItem()

  • Listing your first "solution" here is actually dangerous as it does not solve the calling random repeatedly problem - It calls GetRandomItem() only once. Unless you have a very strange understanding of randomness the calls should return at least two different values for a big enough set of calls. The second variant looks legit though. Both of your solutions in comparison. – mbx Sep 12 '18 at 12:48
  • 2
    Right, I just edited the post to rectify my mistake. Thx – A. Morel Sep 12 '18 at 14:39
1
while (i-- > 0) {

}

You mentioned that while loop is dangerous as it may be infinite - the above form is pretty simple and will never be infinite. At least TOTALLY infinite :)

It's convenient and short (shorter than any of the other answers) and will run exactly i times (because postfix decrement returns value before decrementation).

  • 3
    You missed the variable declaration and initialization which would then render your version inferior to the requested for(1..10) and the selected answer of int.Times via the extension method. – mbx Oct 19 '17 at 5:35
  • Indeed, the best use case for this scenario is when you declare/initialise the loop count in previous instructions using some more involved logic and here just apply the loop logic. – aaimnr Oct 19 '17 at 9:08

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