618

Is there a way to make HTML properly treat \n line breaks? Or do I have to replace them with <br/>?

<div class="text">
  abc
  def
  ghi
</div>

0

11 Answers 11

967

This is to show new line and return carriage in HTML. Then you don't need to do it explicitly. You can do it in CSS by setting the white-space attribute pre-line value.

<span style="white-space: pre-line">@Model.CommentText</span>
4
  • 77
    You can also use white-space: pre-wrap if want to retain tabs space also. Jun 11, 2019 at 8:57
  • 1
    Great answer! the problem with answers with <pre> is the block is rendered like a code block Jun 17, 2023 at 11:57
  • 1
    I might be missing something but this just doesn't seem to work. <span style="white-space: pre-line">Does this work? \n No</span>
    – JKL
    Sep 13, 2023 at 8:21
  • @JKL You can't put \n in there; it has to be an actual newline.
    – Paul Lynch
    Nov 17, 2023 at 18:49
377

You can use CSS white-space property for \n. You can also preserve the tabs as in \t.

For line break \n:

white-space: pre-line;

For line break \n and tabs \t:

white-space: pre-wrap;

document.getElementById('just-line-break').innerHTML = 'Testing 1\nTesting 2\n\tNo tab';

document.getElementById('line-break-and-tab').innerHTML = 'Testing 1\nTesting 2\n\tWith tab';
#just-line-break {
  white-space: pre-line;
}

#line-break-and-tab {
  white-space: pre-wrap;
}
<div id="just-line-break"></div>

<br/>

<div id="line-break-and-tab"></div>

2
  • 7
    This is available for a long time and it's supported by all major browsers.
    – Darlesson
    Jun 21, 2018 at 21:45
  • It is important to note that for this to work, your \n needs to be registered as HTML. If it just comes in as pure text, it will be displayed as text.
    – Akaisteph7
    Feb 23 at 23:37
102

It can be done various ways.

For example, if you want to insert a new line in a text area, you can use these:

&#10; line feed and &#13; carriage return, used like this:

<textarea>Hello &#10;&#13;Stackoverflow</textarea>

You can also use <pre>---</pre> preformatted text like this:

<pre>
  This is line 1
  This is line 2
  This is line 3
</pre>

Or you can use a <p>----</p> paragraph tag like this:

<p>This is line 1</p>
<p>This is line 2</p>
<p>This is line 3</p>

2
  • 7
    Could you please elaborate on your last note? I don't understand why you think server side support is required for this...
    – Shadow
    Jul 18, 2017 at 23:27
  • 3
    The last sentence here is objectively false, as several other answers have demonstrated. And even if it weren't supported natively, you could easily change it with client-side JavaScript. May 12, 2020 at 22:48
39

You could use the <pre> tag

<div class="text">
<pre>
  abc
  def
  ghi
</pre>
  abc
  def
  ghi
</div>

0
29

Using white-space: pre-line allows you to input the text directly in the HTML with line breaks without having to use \n

If you use the innerText property of the element via JavaScript on a non-pre element e.g. a <div>, the \n values will be replaced with <br> in the DOM by default

  • innerText: replaces \n with <br>
  • innerHTML, textContent: require the use of styling white-space

It depends on how your applying the text, but there are a number of options

const node = document.createElement('div');
node.innerText = '\n Test \n One '
2
  • 1
    Interesting. I ran into this on accident. Is there any documentation describing this? Aug 14, 2021 at 23:46
  • 1
    There's a number of different concepts here, and the br behavior is browser dependent - so it's unlikely to be described as a single piece of documentation. I've rarely used innerText, but use white-space styling regularly
    – Drenai
    Aug 15, 2021 at 16:36
28

You can use this CSS property:

white-space: pre-line
1
  • THANK YOU! -- been looking at this for a couple of days now - and it works great. Oct 2, 2023 at 23:37
22

You can use <pre> tag:

<div class="text">
<pre>
abc
def
ghi
</pre>
</div>

0
12

Simple and linear:

 <p> my phrase is this..<br>
 the other line is this<br>
 the end is this other phrase..
 </p>
2
  • The <br> HTML element produces a line break in text (carriage-return). It is useful for writing a poem or an address, where the division of lines is significant. This is easier. developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/HTML/Element/br Dec 4, 2021 at 6:08
  • @DiegoLopeLoyola I agree with you but sometimes some compilers or programming languages unfortunately accepts only this HTML tag for this purpose. Dec 4, 2021 at 12:00
11

You can use any of the following CSS,

white-space: pre-line;

or

white-space: pre-wrap;

or

white-space: break-spaces;

For more info read: https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/CSS/white-space

3

A simple and more natural solution that doesn't involve CSS styles or numeric character references like &#13;&#10; would be to use the &NewLine; character entity reference:

The primary colors are:&NewLine;- Red&NewLine;- Green&NewLine;- Blue

Note: Since this is defined simply as the LF (line feed, or the U+000A Unicode code point) character, it can be debatable whether it suits scenarios where the entire CR + LF (carriage return + line feed) sequence is required. But then, it worked in my Chrome, Edge and WebView2 tests done in Windows 10, so it should be safe to use.

3
  • This worked but required CSS white-space: pre-line;. Both work well together since some code formatters remove white space. Oct 11, 2022 at 14:59
  • What is the intent of &NewLine;? Literal? Rendered somehow? Some kind of encoding of non-printable ASCII character? Can you elaborate? Feb 14, 2023 at 1:46
  • 1
    @PeterMortensen It's just the character entity reference of a line feed, similar to how &#10; from the accepted answer is its numerical (decimal) entity reference in XML / HTML. They are standard textual or numerical representations of a character defined in the HTML specifications and can be used for almost all Unicode characters, irrespective if they are printable or not. It's not specially rendered, it's just one of the three ways (literal, numerical, textual) to represent such an "entity" in HTML. Feb 14, 2023 at 16:00
1

\n or \t or \r are interpreted inside of <pre>---</pre>

It worked for me.

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