13

I am learning node js, and came across '=>' several times, however struggle to understand what this means.

Here is an example:

app.post('/add-item', (req, res) => {
  // TODO: add an item to be posted
});

Do we actually need this in the above example? A simple explanation would be helpful. Thanks

marked as duplicate by Matt, Krzysztof Safjanowski, Bergi node.js Sep 5 '16 at 12:01

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30

It's nothing node-exclusive, it's an ES6 Arrow function expression

app.post('/add-item', (req, res) => {
  // TODO: add an item to be posted
});

basically means:

app.post('/add-item', function(req, res) {
  // TODO: add an item to be posted
});

The main difference between these two examples is that the first one lexically binds the this value.

  • 4
    good answer, but I doubt lexically binds the this value means much to someone that thinks => is exclusive to node.js – Christopher Reid Sep 5 '16 at 10:15
  • 9
    Yes @AllTheTime, but this could be usefull for anyone else that is looking for => information. Therefor, I included it. – roberrrt-s Sep 5 '16 at 10:54
  • 2
    Nothing special about it. Lexical binding is a fancy word for static binding which in turn means that this doesn't change inside the anonymous function and always points to the object containing it. – mondlos Jun 16 at 16:53
0

This is just a different way of writing an anonymous function:

$(document).ready(() => {
    console.log('Hello I am typescript');
});

is equivalent to JavaScript:

$(document).ready(function(){
    console.log('Hello I am typescript');
});
  • it has two different, default return value on one-liners (no { }) and this is kept from the parent context (that's what you want for callbacks all the time most likely and better use regular functions otherwise) – localhostdotdev May 17 at 0:02

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