17

I have a very large number represented as binary in JavaScript:

 var largeNumber = '11010011010110100001010011111010010111011111000010010111000111110011111011111000001100000110000011000001100111010100111010101110100010001011010101110011110000011000001100000110000011001001100000110000011000001100000110000111000011100000110000011000001100000110000011000010101100011001110101101001100110100100000110000011000001100000110001001101011110110010001011010001101011010100011001001110001110010100111011011111010000110001110010101010001111010010000101100001000001100001011000011011111000011110001110111110011111111000100011110110101000101100000110000011000001100000110000011010011101010110101101001111101001010010111101011000011101100110010011001001111101'

When I convert it to decimal by use of parseInt(largeNumber, 10)l it gives me 1.5798770299367407e+199 but when I try to convert it back to binary:

parseInt(`1.5798770299367407e+199`, 2)

it returns 1 (which I think is related to how parseInt works by rounding value) when I was expecting to see my original binary representation of largeNumber. Can you explain me such behavior? And how I can convert it back to original state in JavaScript?

EDIT: This question is a result of my experiment where I was playing around with storing and transferring large amount of boolean data. The largeNumber is a representation of a collection [true,true,false,true ...] of boolean values which has to be shared between client, client worker and server.

17
  • 1
    parseInt isn't a method of converting from one number system to another. You need to go read what it actually does, then rethink how you achieve your end result. Commented Sep 5, 2016 at 16:29
  • "I have a very large number represented as binary" How was original number converted to largeNumber? Commented Sep 5, 2016 at 17:28
  • 3
    Converting a numerical string to a number is not a lossless process. Numbers only have 64 bits, they can't store much information.
    – Oriol
    Commented Sep 5, 2016 at 17:37
  • 1
    This is a collection of boolean values which is a result of my experiment. I was trying to store the array of boolean as a binary number and convert them to decimal number to see if I can do that process more memory efficient Commented Sep 5, 2016 at 18:25
  • 1
    Have you considered included your description of actual requirement and expected result at Question? It may be helpful in resolving actual requirement? Was not certain what you were actually trying to achieve before reading your comment at stackoverflow.com/questions/39334494/… Commented Sep 5, 2016 at 19:35

4 Answers 4

16

If you're looking to transfer a large amount of binary data, you should use BigInt. BigInt allows you to represent an arbitrary number of bits.

// parse large number from string
let numString = '1101001101011010000101001111101001011101111100001001'

// as number
let num = BigInt('0b' + numString)

// now num holds large number equivalent to numString
console.log(num)  // 3718141639515913n

// print as base 2
console.log(num.toString(2))  // 1101001101011010000101001111101001011101111100001001

Helper functions

// some helper functions

// get kth bit from right
function getKthBit(x, k){
  return (x & (1n << k)) >> k;
}

// set kth bit from right to 1
function setKthBit(x, k){
  return (1n << k) | x;
}

// set kth bit from right to 0
function unsetKthBit(x, k){
  return (x & ~(1n << k));
}

getKthBit(num, 0n);  
// 1n

getKthBit(num, 5n);  
// 0n

setKthBit(num, 1n).toString(2); 
// 1101001101011010000101001111101001011101111100001011

setKthBit(num, 4n); 
// 1101001101011010000101001111101001011101111100011001

unsetKthBit(num, 0n).toString(2);
// 1101001101011010000101001111101001011101111100001000

unsetKthBit(num, 0n).toString(2);
// 1101001101011010000101001111101001011101111100000001

For convenience you may want to add this to BigInt if you're going to be serializing back to the client. Then you can read it back as a string. Otherwise you will get "Uncaught TypeError: Do not know how to serialize a BigInt" because for some reason Javascript Object Notation doesn't know how to serialize one of the types in Javascript.

    Object.defineProperty(BigInt.prototype, "toJSON", {
        get() {
            "use strict";
            return () => this.toString() + 'n';
        }
    });
13

As noted in Andrew L.'s answer, and by several commenters, your largeNumber exceeds what JavaScript can represent as an integer in an ordinary number without loss of precision—which is 9.007199254740991e+15.

If you want to work with larger integers, you will need a BigInt library or other special-purpose code.

Below is some code demonstrating how to convert arbitrarily large positive integers between different base representations, showing that the exact decimal representation of your largeNumber is

15 798 770 299 367 407 029 725 345 423 297 491 683 306 908 462 684 165 669 735 033 278 996 876 231 474 309 788 453 071 122 111 686 268 816 862 247 538 905 966 252 886 886 438 931 450 432 740 640 141 331 094 589 505 960 171 298 398 097 197 475 262 433 234 991 526 525

function parseBigInt(bigint, base) {
  //convert bigint string to array of digit values
  for (var values = [], i = 0; i < bigint.length; i++) {
    values[i] = parseInt(bigint.charAt(i), base);
  }
  return values;
}

function formatBigInt(values, base) {
  //convert array of digit values to bigint string
  for (var bigint = '', i = 0; i < values.length; i++) {
    bigint += values[i].toString(base);
  }
  return bigint;
}

function convertBase(bigint, inputBase, outputBase) {
  //takes a bigint string and converts to different base
  var inputValues = parseBigInt(bigint, inputBase),
    outputValues = [], //output array, little-endian/lsd order
    remainder,
    len = inputValues.length,
    pos = 0,
    i;
  while (pos < len) { //while digits left in input array
    remainder = 0; //set remainder to 0
    for (i = pos; i < len; i++) {
      //long integer division of input values divided by output base
      //remainder is added to output array
      remainder = inputValues[i] + remainder * inputBase;
      inputValues[i] = Math.floor(remainder / outputBase);
      remainder -= inputValues[i] * outputBase;
      if (inputValues[i] == 0 && i == pos) {
        pos++;
      }
    }
    outputValues.push(remainder);
  }
  outputValues.reverse(); //transform to big-endian/msd order
  return formatBigInt(outputValues, outputBase);
}

var largeNumber =
  '1101001101011010000101001111101001011101' + 
  '1111000010010111000111110011111011111000' +
  '0011000001100000110000011001110101001110' +
  '1010111010001000101101010111001111000001' +
  '1000001100000110000011001001100000110000' +
  '0110000011000001100001110000111000001100' +
  '0001100000110000011000001100001010110001' +
  '1001110101101001100110100100000110000011' +
  '0000011000001100010011010111101100100010' +
  '1101000110101101010001100100111000111001' +
  '0100111011011111010000110001110010101010' +
  '0011110100100001011000010000011000010110' +
  '0001101111100001111000111011111001111111' +
  '1000100011110110101000101100000110000011' +
  '0000011000001100000110100111010101101011' +
  '0100111110100101001011110101100001110110' +
  '0110010011001001111101';

//convert largeNumber from base 2 to base 10
var largeIntDecimal = convertBase(largeNumber, 2, 10);


function groupDigits(bigint){//3-digit grouping
  return bigint.replace(/(\d)(?=(\d{3})+$)/g, "$1 ");
}

//show decimal result in console:
console.log(groupDigits(largeIntDecimal));

//converting back to base 2:
var restoredOriginal = convertBase(largeIntDecimal, 10, 2);

//check that it matches the original:
console.log(restoredOriginal === largeNumber);

0
7

BigInt is built into js

function parseBigInt(str, base=10) {
  base = BigInt(base)
  var bigint = BigInt(0)
  for (var i = 0; i < str.length; i++) {
    var code = str[str.length-1-i].charCodeAt(0) - 48; if(code >= 10) code -= 39
    bigint += base**BigInt(i) * BigInt(code)
  }
  return bigint
}
parseBigInt('11010011010110100001010011111010010111011111000010010111000111110011111011111000001100000110000011000001100111010100111010101110100010001011010101110011110000011000001100000110000011001001100000110000011000001100000110000111000011100000110000011000001100000110000011000010101100011001110101101001100110100100000110000011000001100000110001001101011110110010001011010001101011010100011001001110001110010100111011011111010000110001110010101010001111010010000101100001000001100001011000011011111000011110001110111110011111111000100011110110101000101100000110000011000001100000110000011010011101010110101101001111101001010010111101011000011101100110010011001001111101', 2)
// 15798770299367407029725345423297491683306908462684165669735033278996876231474309788453071122111686268816862247538905966252886886438931450432740640141331094589505960171298398097197475262433234991526525n
2
  • This worked perfectly for my need. I just have a large binary string I have to convert to a decimal string
    – Justin
    Commented Feb 14, 2020 at 12:27
  • 7
    Note that with BigInt, the OP can be solved with the single expression BigInt('0b' + str). Commented Feb 14, 2020 at 19:00
5

When you convert it back to binary, you don't parse it as base 2, that's wrong. You're also trying to parse an integer as a float, this can cause imprecision. With this line:

parseInt(`1.5798770299367407e+199`, 2)

You're telling JS to parse a base 10 as base 2! What you need to do is convert it to binary like so (note the use of parseFloat):

var largeNumber = '11010011010110100001010011111010010111011111000010010111000111110011111011111000001100000110000011000001100111010100111010101110100010001011010101110011110000011000001100000110000011001001100000110000011000001100000110000111000011100000110000011000001100000110000011000010101100011001110101101001100110100100000110000011000001100000110001001101011110110010001011010001101011010100011001001110001110010100111011011111010000110001110010101010001111010010000101100001000001100001011000011011111000011110001110111110011111111000100011110110101000101100000110000011000001100000110000011010011101010110101101001111101001010010111101011000011101100110010011001001111101';

//intLN is integer of large number
var intLN = parseFloat(largeNumber, 2); //here, you used base 10 to parse as integer, Incorrect
console.log(intLN);

var largeNumberConvert = intLN.toString(2); //here, we convert back to binary with toString(radix).
console.log(largeNumberConvert);

Before, you converted a decimal to binary. What you need to do is call toString(radix) to convert it back into binary, so:

var binaryRepresentation = integerFormOfLargeNumber.toString(2);

If you look at the output, you see:

Infinity
Infinity

Since your binary number is quite large, it can affect the results. Because JS supports up to 64 bits, the number is way too large. It causes Infinity and is imprecise. If you try re-converting the largeNumberConvert from binary to decimal like this:

parseInt(largeNumberConvert, 10);

You can see that it outputs Infinity.

7
  • largeNumber is too large for this.
    – Arnial
    Commented Sep 5, 2016 at 16:38
  • The other subtlety here is negative numbers: stackoverflow.com/questions/9939760/…
    – Ian Gilroy
    Commented Sep 5, 2016 at 16:50
  • @IanGilroy Yes, that's another thing to take into account
    – Andrew Li
    Commented Sep 5, 2016 at 16:51
  • 1
    @guest271314 It doesn't. This is because the binary number is too large for JS, see last part of answer
    – Andrew Li
    Commented Sep 5, 2016 at 19:42
  • 2
    "telling JS to parse a base 10 as base 2!" - actually it's worse than that. He's telling to parse a floating-point number in scientific notation as an integer.
    – Bergi
    Commented Sep 5, 2016 at 20:09

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