42

I was trying to slice an object using Array.prototype, but it returns an empty array, is there any method to slice objects besides passing arguments or is just my code that has something wrong? Thx!!

var my_object = {
 0: 'zero',
 1: 'one',
 2: 'two',
 3: 'three',
 4: 'four'
};

var sliced = Array.prototype.slice.call(my_object, 4);
console.log(sliced);
4
  • Closest you can get to that is deleting the key with delete object.property and making sure you've stored that property in a separate variable before then. Sep 5, 2016 at 19:26
  • What is your expected output? Slicing an object makes no sense - it doesn't mean anything, but if you can explain what you'd like your expected output to be we can work to get there.
    – winhowes
    Sep 5, 2016 at 19:37
  • I try to create a new array, only with the properties that I could need, i.e: var obj = {car: 'audi', engine: 'diesel', color: 'blue'} as output I would like a new object only with the "color" property.
    – JC Garcia
    Sep 5, 2016 at 19:42
  • I would like a new object - but Array.slice returns an array Sep 5, 2016 at 19:46

11 Answers 11

66

Nobody mentioned Object.entries() yet, which might be the most flexible way to do it. This method uses the same ordering as for..in when enumerating properties, i.e. the order that properties were originally entered in the object. You also get subarrays with both property and value so you can use whichever or both. Finally you don't have to worry about the properties being numerical or setting an extra length property (as you do when using Array.prototype.slice.call()).
Here's an example:

const obj = {'prop1': 'foo', 'prop2': 'bar', 'prop3': 'baz', 'prop4': {'prop': 'buzz'}};

You want to slice the first two values:

Object.entries(obj).slice(0,2).map(entry => entry[1]);
//["foo", "bar"]

All of the keys?

Object.entries(obj).slice(0).map(entry => entry[0]);
//["prop1", "prop2", "prop3", "prop4"]

The last key-value pair?

Object.entries(obj).slice(-1)
//[ ['prop4', {'prop': 'buzz'}] ]
4
  • 7
    Object.entries is certainly a useful method to know about (new with ECMA 262, apparently) ... but it seems just to produce an array of arrays, which isn't really what the OP was asking for. Nov 16, 2017 at 10:13
  • 1
    Object.entries is not supported in IE.
    – MBouwman
    Jul 5, 2019 at 8:58
  • 3
    Unfortunately This solution will result in a new Array and not a new Object. When we want to slice an Object, we expect a sliced Object and not a sliced Array.
    – milad
    Sep 22, 2020 at 18:10
  • I love you for this answer @Trad
    – Agent K
    Jun 16, 2021 at 17:35
33

You can reduce the result of Object.keys function

const myObject = {
 0: 'zero',
 1: 'one',
 2: 'two',
 3: 'three',
 4: 'four'
};

const sliced = Object.keys(myObject).slice(0, 2).reduce((result, key) => {
                    result[key] = myObject[key];

                    return result;
                }, {});

console.log(sliced);

1
  • 2
    best one! love it.
    – Lu Chinke
    Jun 4, 2019 at 11:53
22

The best modern solution to this is the combination of Object.fromEntries and Object.entries.

const foo = {
    one: 'ONE',
    two: 'TWO',
    three: 'THRE',
    four: 'FOUR',
}

const sliced = Object.fromEntries(
    Object.entries(foo).slice(1, 3)
)

console.log(sliced)

2
  • 1
    I'm curious, did you benchmark this against other methods? Istinctively seems slow but I might be wrong. It's definitely the most elegant solution imho.
    – santamanno
    Sep 1, 2021 at 17:58
  • 1
    I haven't tested it. My guess is my solution is a little bit slower but the accepted answer is not returning the keys and is not very clean in my opinion. Sep 26, 2021 at 0:31
11

I was trying to slice an object using Array.prototype, but it returns an empty array

That's because it doesn't have a .length property. It will try to access it, get undefined, cast it to a number, get 0, and slice at most that many properties out of the object. To achieve the desired result, you therefore have to assign it a length, or iterator through the object manually:

var my_object = {0: 'zero', 1: 'one', 2: 'two', 3: 'three', 4: 'four'};

my_object.length = 5;
console.log(Array.prototype.slice.call(my_object, 4));

var sliced = [];
for (var i=0; i<4; i++)
    sliced[i] = my_object[i];
console.log(sliced);

2
  • 1
    so I guess there's no other way than manually modifying the object, adding length, or the iterator...
    – JC Garcia
    Sep 5, 2016 at 19:56
  • Don't be fooled, keep reading as @trad now has the best answer, and a couple other clever answers can be found. Jul 30, 2020 at 15:45
5
var obj = {0: 'zero', 1: 'one', 2: 'two', 3: 'three', 4: 'four'};
var result = Object.keys(obj).slice(0,2).map(key => ({[key]:obj[key]}));

console.log(result);

[ { '0': 'zero' }, { '1': 'one' } ]

2

Try adding a 'length' property to my_object and then your code should work:

    var my_object = {
     0: 'zero',
     1: 'one',
     2: 'two',
     3: 'three',
     4: 'four',
     length: 5
    };
    
    var sliced = Array.prototype.slice.call(my_object, 4);
    console.log(sliced);

1

I think it can helps you:

var my_object = { 0: 'zero', 1: 'one', 2: 'two', 3: 'three', 4: 'four' };

var sliced = Object.keys(my_object).map(function(key) { return my_object[key] }).slice(4);

console.log(sliced);
1
  • 2
    with the downside that keys() is not guaranteed to return the keys for the object in any particular order.
    – Ted Hopp
    Sep 5, 2016 at 19:43
1

const res = Object.fromEntries(Object.entries(my_object).slice(0,4));

0

You don't mention it in your question, but that looks awfully a lot like an arguments object.

Convert it to an array using Array.from() then use it like any other array. As long as it is an enumerable object.

For a polyfill for older browsers, see https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Array/from

0

You can't unless it has a [Symbol.iterator] generator function and length property exists. Such as;

var my_object = { 0: 'zero', 1: 'one', 2: 'two', 3: 'three', 4: 'four', length:5 },
       sliced;

my_object[Symbol.iterator] = function* (){
                                          var oks = Object.keys(this);
                                          for (var key of oks) yield this[key];
                                         };

sliced = Array.prototype.slice.call(my_object, 2);
console.log(sliced);

6
  • An iterator or a length is enough, you don't need both.
    – Bergi
    Sep 5, 2016 at 19:46
  • @Bergi That's what i had thought about having just an iterator... i've just tested with an iterator an it didn't work.. I am not sure with only length property it would be OK though. No just an iterator won't cut. May be there is something i am missing.
    – Redu
    Sep 5, 2016 at 19:50
  • slice doesn't care for an iterator (it only cares for the length), Array.from(my_object).slice(4) would. I thought you had Array.from in mind when talking about iterables…
    – Bergi
    Sep 5, 2016 at 19:52
  • @Bergi try it with .slice(2)
    – Redu
    Sep 5, 2016 at 19:53
  • @Bergi OK you are right with only length property it's fine. Gotto correct.
    – Redu
    Sep 5, 2016 at 19:55
0

// Works, but acts weird when things get serious
// Avoids screwing with the properties of my_object
// You don't get Object.create() until ES5.1
function lazySlice(obj, idx) {
  var newObj = Object.create(obj, { length: {value: Object.keys(obj).length} }),
  idx = idx || 0;

  return Array.prototype.slice.call(newObj, idx);
}

// Only gives you own enumerable properties with keys "0" to n
// Preserves element order (based on key number)
// Ignores non-numbered keys
// You don't get Object.keys() until ES5
function enumSlice(obj, idx) {
  var arr = [], 
    keys = Object.keys(obj),
    idx = idx || 0;

  for (var i = 0; i <= keys.length - 1; i++)
    if (keys[i] >= idx && keys[i] % 1 === 0 && keys[i] >= 0 && keys[i].indexOf('e') < 0) 
      arr.push(obj[keys[i]]);

  return arr;
}

var my_object = {
  0: 'zero',
  1: 'one',
  2: 'two',
  3: 'three',
  4: 'four'
}; 
console.log(lazySlice(my_object, 3));      // [ 'three', 'four' ]
console.log(enumSlice(my_object, 3));      // [ 'three', 'four' ]

var mixed_object = {
   "9": 'nine',
   "2": 'two',
   "1": 'one',
   "7": 'seven',
   "7.5": 'seven point five',
   "1e4": 'sneaky',
   "-4": 'negative four',
   "0": 'zero',
   "length": 35
};
console.log(lazySlice(mixed_object));      // [ 'zero', 'one', 'two', , , , , 'seven',  ]
console.log(enumSlice(mixed_object));      // [ 'zero', 'one', 'two', 'seven', 'nine' ]

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