2

When viewing the below MIT 6.001 course video, at 28:00 the instructor marks this algorithm as iteration. But, at 30.27 he says both this and the actual "recursive" algorithms are recursive. The function is calling itself with a base case, so how is this iteration?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dlbMuv-jix8&list=PLE18841CABEA24090&index=2

private int iterativeSum(int x, int y)
{
    System.out.println("x "+x+" y "+y);
    if(x == 0)
    {
        return y;
    }
    return iterativeSum(--x, ++y);
}
  • 2
    That makes more sense if you 1) forget about Java for about an hour, and 2) pay attention to the entire lecture. (And possibly also read the book; the relevant chapter is "1.2 Procedures and the Processes They Generate".) Also, the lecture series uses Scheme, not Lisp (or Java), and tail-call optimisation is essential to the discussion. – molbdnilo Sep 6 '16 at 11:48
  • related: sicp. – Will Ness Sep 18 '16 at 13:29
4

He seems to be more interested in how it's executed, rather than how the code is written. There's a big difference between those two, but that's a whole other conversation (but notably, some languages will compile recursions as iterations, as an example).

In this case, it is iteration when you hold the whole state in one place and repeatedly work on that one piece of data. It is recursion when you have a stack of states and add to the stack, then eventually collapse the stack back down to an answer.

In his example at 31:00, he shows this as being iteration when there is one bit of paper that holds the entire state of the work done so far, and any one guy can take it and eventually produce the final answer.

In the example of recursion at 32:20, Joe has his own notes on the problem, and only passes on notes about a subsection of the problem. Harry then has enough information for his subsection of the problem, but the entire problem still requires Joe to hold on to his own information to process Harry's results when he gets them back from Harry.

You have a whole stack of people, with more people being added to the stack until one of them has a problem simple enough to do it by himself, and he can return his answer right away, which means the second last guy now has a simpler problem and can now return his answer, and so on until the entire stack of people collapses back down into one last (first) person who then produces the final answer.

  • Thanks, but in the java version of this, each "person" in the stack seem to be returning the value back. For example, in sum(3,2): sum(2,3) returns the result which it gets from the subsequent invocations back to sum(3,2). So isn't this recursive? Not really sure how LISP returns back in the method shown in the course: (DEFINE (+ X Y) (IF (= X 0) Y (+ (-1 + X) (1 + Y)))). Could something be recursive in java and not in lisp? I doubt – Stacky Sep 6 '16 at 1:23
  • 1
    @Stacky Yes, Java's semantics make this recursive with a big stack, but the point is that once you hit that last line, which is just return iterativeSum(...);, you don't need anything from the stack. It's not return iterativeSum(...) + 2; for instance. You can easily convert this into a trampolined version, e.g., pastebin.com/uvGcKGw1 . – Joshua Taylor Sep 6 '16 at 13:29
2

There are two separate senses of the word "recursive" being used here. One is syntactical -- any function calling itself is syntactically (i.e. syntax-wise) recursive.

Another is about essential behaviour of a computation process encoded by a given piece of code -- whether it runs in constant stack space (so is essentially iterative), or not (so is essentially recursive).

Scheme has tail call optimization, so your code is actually

private int iterativeSum(int x, int y)
{
ITERATIVE_SUM:
    System.out.println("x "+x+" y "+y);
    if(x == 0)
    {
        goto RETURN;
    }
    --x;    // return iterativeSum(--x, ++y);
    ++y;
    goto ITERATIVE_SUM;
RETURN:
    return y
}

which is equivalent to a standard while loop, because a tail-recursive function call reuses the function call frame.

2

I think this is based on definitions in SICP. Here is the the relevant section. In short, recursive function can generate iterative process if recursive call is in tail position: none of the local variables' current values need to be remembered and their space can be cleared / reused (it is somewhat easier to see with LISP where everything is expression and one can see how the size of the expression does not grow in iterative process).

Recursive process, in contrast, is not finished yet after the recursive call is finished. For example, this function

private int recursiveSum(int x, int y)
{
    if(x == 0)
    {
        return y;
    }
    return ++(recursiveSum(--x, y));
}

will generate recursive process, as an extra piece of work (++()) still needs to be done.

Whether the compiler would actually implement tail-call optimization (TCO) is a different matter. AFAIK, to date JVM does not support it. Function calling itself in tail position is in general easy to optimise (as a loop). The difficulty comes when one function is calling another, and the other is calling the first function back, etc.

2

In the sense that the function calls itself, it is recursive. However, it has the important attribute that the result of the invocation depends solely on the result from another function call; no values from the current stack are needed. The result is provided by

return iterativeSum(--x, ++y);

not from something like

return iterativeSum(--x, ++y) + x;

which would require "coming back" from the recursive call, doing something with the result, and then returning that. Because the result doesn't require anything from the current stack frame, an implementation (in some languages, depending on the semantics) could eliminate or reuse the current stack frame. That's called tail-call elimination, and it's mandated in some languages, like Scheme. That's why the Scheme implementation of that algorithm is essentially iterative: it doesn't require unbounded amounts of stack space.

In Scheme, the tail call elimination means that the implementation is essentially the following, in which iterativeSumDriver is a trampoline of sorts, or the iterative driver over the results provided by iterativeSumInternal.

public class IterativeSummer {
    /**
     * Returns a sum, computed iteratively.
     *
     * @param x the augend
     * @param y the addend
     * @return the sum of the augend and addend
     */
    public int iterativeSumDriver(int x, int y) {
        int[] state = new int[] { x, y };
        while (state.length == 2) {
            state = iterativeSumInternal(state[0], state[1]);
        }
        return state[0];
    }

    /**
     * Returns the new computation state of a iterative sum
     * computation.  If x is 0, then returns an array of just y.
     * Otherwise, returns an an array of x-1 and y+1.
     *
     * @param x the augend
     * @param y the addend
     * @return the next interal state
     */
    int[] iterativeSumInternal(int x, int y) {
        if (x == 0) {
            return new int[] { y };
        }
        else {
            return new int[] { x-1, y+1 };
        }
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        int x = 5;
        int y = 6;
        int sum = new IterativeSummer().iterativeSumDriver(x,y);
        System.out.println(String.format("%d + %d = %d", x, y, sum));
    }
}

A Proper Trampoline

As Will Ness pointed out, a proper trampoline doesn't really know about the states used in a computation; it just needs to have something to call until a non-callable thing gets returned. Here's a version that does that.

public class Trampoline {
    /**
     * State of a computation for a trampoline.
     * 
     * @param <T> the type of value
     */
    public interface TrampolineState<T> {
        /**
         * Returns whether the state is a finished state.
         * 
         * @return whether the state is a finshed state
         */
        boolean isFinished();

        /**
         * Returns the value, if this state is finished.
         * 
         * @return the value
         * @throws IllegalStateException if the state is not finished
         */
        T getValue() throws IllegalStateException;

        /**
         * Returns the next state, if this state is not finished.
         * 
         * @return the next state
         * @throws IllegalStateException if the state is finished
         */
        TrampolineState<T> getNext() throws IllegalStateException;
    }

    /**
     * Executes a trampolined state and its successors until a finished state is
     * reached, and then returns the value of the finished state.
     * 
     * @param state the state
     * @return the value
     */
    public <T> T trampoline(TrampolineState<T> state) {
        while (!state.isFinished()) {
            state = state.getNext();
        }
        return state.getValue();
    }

    /**
     * Returns the state for for sum computation. 
     * 
     * @param x the augend
     * @param y the addend
     * @return the state
     */
    private TrampolineState<Integer> getSumTrampolineState(int x, int y) {
        return new TrampolineState<Integer>() {
            @Override
            public boolean isFinished() {
                return x == 0;
            }

            @Override
            public Integer getValue() {
                if (!isFinished()) {
                    throw new IllegalStateException();
                }
                return y;
            }

            @Override
            public TrampolineState<Integer> getNext() {
                if (isFinished()) {
                    throw new IllegalStateException();
                }
                return getSumTrampolineState(x - 1, y + 1);
            }
        };
    }

    /**
     * Returns a sum, computed by a trampolined computation.
     * 
     * @param x the augend
     * @param y the addend
     * @return the sum
     */
    public int sum(int x, int y) {
        return trampoline(getSumTrampolineState(x, y));
    }
}
  • a trampoline must return and handle a what-to-do-next parameter. Yes it's more work, but, you mentioned the T word, and it'd really be great if it were shown explicitly in your code, even though it's redundant. :) – Will Ness Sep 8 '16 at 12:52
  • @WillNess That's why I said "a trampoline of sorts". But sure, we can do a genuine trampoline (just a sec). – Joshua Taylor Sep 8 '16 at 12:53
  • 1
    @WillNess How's about pastebin.com/hBWFeWKR (also added to the answer)? I've also used trampolines in an answer to a Common Lisp question, How do I jump out of a function in Lisp?. Also, for other readers, have a look at this question: What is a trampoline function? – Joshua Taylor Sep 8 '16 at 14:33

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.