25

I have some code use lambda expression like it:

#include <vector>
#include <algorithm>
int main(){
    std::vector<int> vi={3,1};
    std::sort(vi.begin(),vi.end(),[](int x,int y){
        return x<y;
    });
    return 0;
}

Which doesn't require #include< functional> to compile, but if I use a variable to store the lambda function:

#include <vector>
#include <algorithm>
#include <functional>
int main(){
    std::vector<int> vi={3,1};
    std::function<void()> compf=[](int x,int y){
        return x<y;
    };
    std::sort(vi.begin(),vi.end(),compf);
    return 0;
}

Then I need to include <functional> to compile, why? And why sort() doesn't also include <functional> already?

4
  • 9
    Are you under the impression that a lambda is a std::function? It's not; there's a conversion involved when you store it to compf. Commented Sep 6, 2016 at 4:26
  • 9
    Because lambda expressions are part of the language. std::function is part of the standard library and so requires a header include. Commented Sep 6, 2016 at 4:26
  • 4
    @PaulRooney, To be fair, for (int i : {1, 2, 3}) also requires a header include despite no explicit standard library usage.
    – chris
    Commented Sep 6, 2016 at 4:45
  • 3
    @chris true. I always found that a bit weird. Commented Sep 6, 2016 at 4:48

2 Answers 2

46

Because a lambda expression is a core language feature, provided by the compiler. std::function is a library feature, implemented in code. Note that you don't need to include anything to store the lambda in a variable.

auto f = [](int x, int y){ return x < y; };

You only need to include <functional> if you plan to store it in a std::function (because that's where it's implemented).

You seem to be under the impression that the type of a lambda is a std::function. It is not. Every lambda expression has its own unique, unnameable type. I captured that type above, with auto. std::function is a more general type that can store any function-like object with the appropriate signature. For example, I can create a std::function<int(int,int)> object, and assign to it a normal function, a function object, and a lambda.

#include <functional>
int minus_func(int a, int b) { return a - b; }

struct plus_t {
    int operator()(int a, int b) const { return a + b; }
};

int main() {
    auto mult_lambda = [](int a, int b) { return a * b; };

    std::function<int(int,int)> func;
    func = minus_func;
    func = plus_t{};
    func = mult_lambda;
}

There's also a cost to that generality, in the form of dynamic allocation, and indirection. Whereas using a lambda through a variable of its actual type is very often inlined.

5
  • 1
    std::function<> implementations may have static storage as to avoid dynamic allocation for callables below a certain size. This is similar to the small string optimization. Commented Sep 6, 2016 at 4:38
  • 1
    How is the line "func=plus_t{}" supposed to work? Does it create an anonymous object of type "plus_t"?
    – blackpen
    Commented Sep 6, 2016 at 6:11
  • 1
    Don't you mean "and assign to it" rather than "and assign it to"? Commented Sep 6, 2016 at 6:17
  • @blackpen: Yes, that's what it does. It uses uniform initialization syntax. I could have also used the more traditional func = plus_t();. Commented Sep 6, 2016 at 16:01
  • 2
    @user2296177 "Must" have for certain objects (function pointers and a few others), "may" have for objects (typically under a certain size), but there is no mandate that small lambdas must ever be stored with SOO in a std::function (this is a quality of library implementation issue, however). One popular std library (MSVC's) will SOO any callable no bigger than two std::strings (which themselves have SOO for short strings) if I remember rightly. Commented Sep 6, 2016 at 17:50
6

lambda functions are part of the language -- independent of any libraries.

std::function, on the other hand, is part of the standard library and is defined in the standard library header file functional.

Hence, use of

std::sort(vi.begin(),vi.end(),[](int x,int y){
    return x<y;
});

does not require functional to be #included while use of

std::function<void()> compf=[](int x,int y){
    return x<y;
};
std::sort(vi.begin(),vi.end(),compf);

requires functional to be #included.

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