15

I have a CSV file from which I would like to extract some pieces of information: for each distinct value in one colum, I would like to compute the sum of the corresponding values in another column. Eventually, I may do it in Python, but I believe there could be a simple solution using awk.

This could be the CSV file:

2    1:2010-1-bla:bla    1.6
2    2:2010-1-bla:bla   1.1
2    2:2010-1-bla:bla    3.4
2    3:2010-1-bla:bla    -1.3
2    3:2010-1-bla:bla    6.0
2    3:2010-1-bla:bla    1.1
2    4:2010-1-bla:bla    -1.0
2    5:2010-1-bla:bla    10.9

I would like to get:

1    1.6
2    4.5
3    5.8
4    -1.0
5    10.9

For now, I can only extract:

a) the values of the first colum:

awk -F ' ' '{print $(2)}' MyFile.csv | awk -F ':' '{print $(1)}'

and then get:

1
2
2
3
3
3
4
5

b) and the values equal to, say, 1.1 in the last column with:

awk -F ' ' '{print $(NF)}' MyFile.csv | awk '$1 == 1.1'

and then get:

1.1
1.1

I am not able to simultaneously extract the columns I am interested in, which may help me in the end. Here is a sample output which may ease the computation of the sums (I don't know):

1    1.6
2    1.1
2    3.4
3    -1.3
3    6.0
3    1.1
4    -1.0
5    10.9

Edit: Thanks to Elenaher, we could say the input is the file above.

1
  • can you give us example input?
    – stew
    Oct 14, 2010 at 14:53

6 Answers 6

12
$ awk -F"[: \t]+" '{a[$2]+=$NF}END{for(i in a ) print i,a[i] }' file
4 -1
5 10.9
1 1.6
2 4.5
3 5.8
1
  • I have finally decided to accept this answer since it is really more general and could adapt to a lot of similar problems by tweaking the separators or the number of the columns.
    – Wok
    Oct 14, 2010 at 15:51
4

This is assuming you have the two columns you showed before: 1 1.1

BEGIN {
    last = "";
    sum = 0;
}

{
    if ($1 != last) {
        if (last != "") {
            print last " " sum;
        }
        sum = 0;
        last = $1;
    }
    sum = sum + $2
}

END {
    print last " " sum;
}
1
  • Your answer is great to answer my second question. I wish I could upvote it more than once.
    – Wok
    Oct 14, 2010 at 15:53
2

So, assuming that your input looks like this:

unique_col, to_sum
1.3, 1 2 3
1.3, 5 6 7
1.4, 2 3 4

Then this should do the trick:

$ awk -F, '{ if (seen[$1] == "") { split($2, to_sum, " "); seen[$1] = 0; for (x in to_sum) seen[$1] += to_sum[x]; }} END { for (x in seen) { if (x != "") { print x " " seen[x]; }}}' < input
1.3 6
1.4 9
2
  • It works great on your input, but mine is a bit different. Still thanks.
    – Wok
    Oct 14, 2010 at 15:41
  • Ah, sorry — wrote it before you had the example up, so I had to guess =\ Oct 14, 2010 at 19:17
1

For your last question, you can use split and display simultaneously the two columns :

cat filename | awk '{split($2,tab,":"); id = tab[1]; print id " -> " $3;}'

That prints :

1 -> 1.6
2 -> 1.1
2 -> 3.4
3 -> -1.3
3 -> 6.0
3 -> 1.1
4 -> -1.0
5 -> 10.9

For the complete result you can use :

awk -F, '{ split($1,line,"    "); split(line[2],tab,":"); id=tab[1]; if (sums[id]=="") {sums[id] = 0;} sums[id]+=line[3];} END {for (i=1;i<=length(sums);i++) print i " -> "sums[i]}' < test

that prints :

1 -> 1.6
2 -> 4.5
3 -> 5.8
4 -> -1
5 -> 10.9
2
  • Thanks. I did not know the split keyword for awk.
    – Wok
    Oct 14, 2010 at 15:05
  • Thanks, your code works (although I have to edit the input since there was a missing space which is not handled then).
    – Wok
    Oct 14, 2010 at 15:39
1

If Perl is an option:

perl -F'(\s+|:)' -lane '$h{$F[2]} += $F[-1]; END{print "$_ $h{$_}" for sort keys %h}' file

output:

1 1.6
2 4.5
3 5.8
4 -1
5 10.9

These command-line options are used:

  • -n loop around every line of the input file
  • -l removes newlines before processing, and adds them back in afterwards
  • -a autosplit mode – split input lines into the @F array. Defaults to splitting on whitespace.
  • -e execute the perl code
  • -F autosplit modifier, in this case splits on a color or one-or-more whitespace

@F is the array of words in each line, indexed starting with $F[0]
$F[-1] is the last word
Store result in hash %h
At the END, iterate through the sorted keys of the hash
Print each element $_ and the hash value $h{$_}

0
{ 
  b=$2;               # assign column 2 to the variable 'b'
  sub( /:.*/, "", b); # get rid of everything after the first colon in b
  results[b] += $3     
}
END {  for (result in results )print result " " results[result] }
1
  • I get the following message: syntax error near unexpected token /:.*/,'`
    – Wok
    Oct 14, 2010 at 15:16

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