30

Initializing a struct with default values is trivial:

struct X { int a; int b = 2; };

and initializing a struct with a brace initializer is trivial too:

X x = {1, 3};

Suprisingly the init code won't compile, until I remove the default value. So, how would I do the init in such a case? I'd like to keep X a POD without c-tor.

  • 4
    Just FYI: with c++14, the code compiles. – Mine Sep 6 '16 at 8:46
  • 1
    documented here: en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/language/aggregate_initialization – Hayt Sep 6 '16 at 8:54
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    The definition of aggregates was changed to explicitly exclude any class with member initializers; therefore, they are not allowed to use aggregate initialization. C++14 relaxes this restriction allowing aggregate initialization on such types. If the braced init list does not provide a value for that argument, the member initializer takes care of it so basically your code is not possible in C++11 without a C-tor. Only in C++14 – Sombrero Chicken Sep 6 '16 at 8:55
26

Here is some documentation relevant to the problem:

http://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/language/aggregate_initialization

In your code is invalid. In it is valid again.

In C++11 adding a default initialization prevents braced init from being valid. In C++14, it does not.

A way to solve your problem in C++11 would be to write a constructor with the value for a and the b value with a default.

  • Had some misinformation in my original answer. Edited it to the right solution, but left the original answer in because the POD-ness seemed also relevant to OP – Hayt Sep 6 '16 at 9:00
  • I edited out the original and edited portions, merging the part that was still valid in the original one once the edited portion was there. If someone wants to see the history, they can click on the history link. Did my modifications keep your original intent? If not, feel free to roll back, but I encourage you to drop the edit/original pattern. – Yakk - Adam Nevraumont Sep 6 '16 at 13:28
  • The message is still the same. I thought it good at the time (when the message had no upvotes and was not accepted) to indicate to the OP that my initial answer was not the one he was looking for. Now it being accepted + the only answer here I can see that it is better that way. – Hayt Sep 6 '16 at 13:36

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