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I am implementing a MVC-Webapplication with ASP.NET Core (RC2) and as ORM Entity Framework Core. Since I already got a database design, I have to create the entity models by the Scaffold-DBContext command.

This works fine. Now, I want to add some annotations to the generated entities in order to add validations. For example MaximumLength:

public class Blog
{
    public int BlogId { get; set; }
    [MaxLength(500)]
    public string Url { get; set; }
}

If there are some database changes, I have to use the scaffold command again. But this results to the loss of some additional annotations. How can I update the entity models without loosing them? According to asp.net page or from this topic, It seems to be possible with EF6. Is there a similar way to achieve this with EF7/Core?

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  • 1
    There is no "database first" approach in EF Core. The scaffold command is intended to get you started with code first from an existing database. Thereafter, you should use migrations to update the database schema from changes to your model. – Mike Brind Sep 6 '16 at 21:10
  • EF Core can also create a model based to an existing database. This is what I mean with "ldatabase first" approach. Do you mean, I should use the command only once and every changes made to the database with migrations? For example: "Add-Migration UpdateTableUser" and then "Update-Database" – user1885888 Sep 7 '16 at 6:29
  • Yes, that is what I mean. – Mike Brind Sep 8 '16 at 15:29
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Yes,you can.You have to use Fluent API instead of Data Annotations.

Here is your example using Fluent API

public  partial class MyContext : DbContext
    {
        public DbSet<Blog> Blogs { get; set; }

        protected override void OnModelCreating(ModelBuilder modelBuilder)
        {
            modelBuilder.Entity<Blog>()
                .Property(b => b.Url)
                .HasMaxLength(500);
        }
    }

OP's feedback

But the Database context class will be also generated. This means, If I use the command again, it will replace the old database context.

My suggestion :

You can use partial class here.keep your custom implementation on that file.Those pieces of custom code won't get overwritten when you re-generate the code.

OP's feedback :

I could solve it with partial classes BUT after generating the entities, you have to go through all entities and delete all duplicated properties. Still not quite that what I am looking for, because you still have to modify the entities.

My suggestion :

You don't need to delete any duplicate mappings. B'cos EF gives precedence to the Fluent API.It doesn't matter what ever the mapping has done by the code regeneration automatically. You can overridden those using Fluent API.That is the power of Fluent API.You can also use DataAnnotation and Fluent API at the same time. But code-First gives precedence to Fluent API > data annotations > default conventions.

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  • Thank you for your answer. But the Database context class will be also generated. This means, If I use the command again, it will replace the old database context. Of course, there are ways to prevent from replacing it... I just hoped there is also a possibility with Data annotations – user1885888 Sep 7 '16 at 6:35
  • That's right, I could solve it with partial classes BUT after generating the entities, you have to go through all entities and delete all duplicated properties. Still not quite that what I am looking for, because you still have to modify the entities. It seems like you do not have to do this in EF 6 (see section "Add metadata classes") – user1885888 Sep 7 '16 at 15:11
  • Thanks for asking. Well, I still faces with ambigious properties. Means, when I create a partial class Blog (example above) and add some custom annotations, I always get a VS error with ambigious reference because there already exists another annotation to that property. This also happens, if I use a parial class for DBContext and define the properties with Fluent API. Do you have a recommended code example? – user1885888 Sep 10 '16 at 12:05
  • why do you need to create duplicate annotations ? – Sampath Sep 10 '16 at 12:34
  • Hi Sampath, I'm trying the approach in your answer but haven't had any luck getting validation to work with fluent api. My models are generated using the scaffold command and the fluent API entries for required/max length validation are all in the onModelCreating method of the context class that EF core generated. I have an ASP.NET core controller that gets the data for the model classes as JSON but ModelState.IsValid always returns true even if I send invalid data. Is there any example that you can point me to? The ones I've seen related to validation are all using Data Annotations. – GlacialFlames Dec 9 '16 at 23:13

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