0

I have a file called "list.txt" which contains the following rows of numbers.

31056780
31909020
31092320
61093190
61094592
45090280
45902902

I need to now take all the rows starting with "31" and store them in another file call file31.txt take all the rows starting with "61" and store them in file61.txt, take all rows starting with "45" store it in file45.txt

file31.txt will contain.

31056780
31909020
31092320

file61.txt will contain.

61093190
61094592

file45.txt will contain.

45090280
45902902

I tried this command for all 3 but it does not do what i want it to do.

awk -F\" '/31*/ {print $0}' list.txt > file31   
awk -F\" '/61*/ {print $0}' list.txt > file61
awk -F\" '/45*/ {print $0}' list.txt > file45
  • 1
    Your patterns aren't anchored to the beginning of the line. So /31*/ will match 61093190 because it has 31 inside it. – Barmar Sep 6 '16 at 19:03
3

You can use output redirection inside a single awk script. It can construct the filename by concatenating the first two characters of the line.

awk '{ fn = "list" substr($0, 1, 2) ".txt"; print > fn }' list.txt
  • Right and you don't even need the variable: awk '{ print > ("list" substr($0, 1, 2) ".txt") }' list.txt. – Ed Morton Sep 6 '16 at 19:17
  • @EdMorton True, but it isn't as easy to understand that way. – Barmar Sep 6 '16 at 19:18
  • @Barmar, hi Sir. this also worked. thanks. – joe Sep 6 '16 at 19:21
1

You could use grep or sed to filter the lines with a matching pattern, for example:

sed '/^31/!d' list.txt > list31.txt

Or in a for loop for every number you want:

for n in "31" "45" "61"; do sed '/^'"$n"'/!d' list.txt > list$n.txt; done

Hope it helps.

  • 1
    Or with the r command: for i in 31 61 45; do sed -n '/^'$i'/w list'$i'.txt' list.txt ; done. – SLePort Sep 6 '16 at 19:06
0

You can use:

awk '/^31/{print > "file31"} /^45/{print > "file45"} /^61/{print > "file61"}' file
  • hi Sir, thanks this worked perfectly. – joe Sep 6 '16 at 19:21
-1

for i in `cat list.txt | cut -c1-2 | uniq`; do cat list.txt | grep -P ^${i} > file${i}.txt; done

This command works fine and is generic enough to work for all cases.

Now let's understand how it works.

cat list.txt | cut -c1-2 | uniq

31

45

61

Next we loop over these unique identifiers to create the new files using cat list.txt | grep -P ^${i}

grep -P finds strings with partial match - here ^ - means that we are looking at this partial string only at the beginning of the line.

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