6

Is there a dplyr (or other package) command for getting the column (field?) types of an SQL table? For example...

library(RSQLite)
library(dplyr)

data(iris)

dat_sql <- src_sqlite("test.sqlite", create = TRUE)
copy_to(dat_sql, iris, name = "iris_df")

iris_tbl <- tbl(dat_sql, "iris_df")
iris_tbl
# Source:   query [?? x 5]
# Database: sqlite 3.8.6 [test.sqlite]
# 
#    Sepal.Length Sepal.Width Petal.Length Petal.Width Species
#           <dbl>       <dbl>        <dbl>       <dbl>   <chr>
# 1           5.1         3.5          1.4         0.2  setosa
# 2           4.9         3.0          1.4         0.2  setosa
# 3           4.7         3.2          1.3         0.2  setosa
# 4           4.6         3.1          1.5         0.2  setosa
# 5           5.0         3.6          1.4         0.2  setosa
# 6           5.4         3.9          1.7         0.4  setosa
# 7           4.6         3.4          1.4         0.3  setosa
# 8           5.0         3.4          1.5         0.2  setosa
# 9           4.4         2.9          1.4         0.2  setosa
# 10          4.9         3.1          1.5         0.1  setosa
# # ... with more rows

I'm interested in a command that would tell me that the first four columns are of type dbl and the last is a chr (or better yet, the R types numeric and character) without actually collecting the data in memory. Since it is printed, there has to be a way to do this, right? I tried str to no avail:

str(iris_tbl)
# List of 2
#  $ src:List of 2
#   ..$ con :Formal class 'SQLiteConnection' [package "RSQLite"] with 5 slots
#   .. .. ..@ Id                 :<externalptr> 
#   .. .. ..@ dbname             : chr "test.sqlite"
#   .. .. ..@ loadable.extensions: logi TRUE
#   .. .. ..@ flags              : int 6
#   .. .. ..@ vfs                : chr ""
#   ..$ path: chr "test.sqlite"
#   ..- attr(*, "class")= chr [1:3] "src_sqlite" "src_sql" "src"
#  $ ops:List of 3
#   ..$ src :List of 2
#   .. ..$ con :Formal class 'SQLiteConnection' [package "RSQLite"] with 5 slots
#   .. .. .. ..@ Id                 :<externalptr> 
#   .. .. .. ..@ dbname             : chr "test.sqlite"
#   .. .. .. ..@ loadable.extensions: logi TRUE
#   .. .. .. ..@ flags              : int 6
#   .. .. .. ..@ vfs                : chr ""
#   .. ..$ path: chr "test.sqlite"
#   .. ..- attr(*, "class")= chr [1:3] "src_sqlite" "src_sql" "src"
#   ..$ x   :Classes 'ident', 'sql', 'character'  chr "iris_df"
#   ..$ vars: chr [1:5] "Sepal.Length" "Sepal.Width" "Petal.Length" "Petal.Width" ...
#   ..- attr(*, "class")= chr [1:3] "op_base_remote" "op_base" "op"
#  - attr(*, "class")= chr [1:4] "tbl_sqlite" "tbl_sql" "tbl_lazy" "tbl"
# NULL
5

When printing a preview of the remote table, it looks like dplyr does use collect on the first few rows of the table. Because dplyr retrieves some sample data, you could do this as well.

Here, we make a query for the first few rows with head, collect the query results, and inspect the class of each column.

iris_tbl %>% 
  head %>% 
  collect %>% 
  lapply(class) %>% 
  unlist
#> Sepal.Length  Sepal.Width Petal.Length  Petal.Width      Species 
#>    "numeric"    "numeric"    "numeric"    "numeric"  "character" 

(When used with a data-frame, lapply does column-wise function application, so it applies class to each column.)

To get the types names that dplyr uses, use type_sum.

iris_tbl %>% head %>% collect %>% lapply(type_sum) %>% unlist
#> Sepal.Length  Sepal.Width Petal.Length  Petal.Width      Species 
#>        "dbl"        "dbl"        "dbl"        "dbl"        "chr" 
  • Feels unsatisfying, but can't deny that it works! Do you know if there is much overhead imposed on a head (or tail) statement for large databases? I often work with data that has on the order of several million rows. – Alexey Shiklomanov Sep 9 '16 at 14:44
  • Also, +1 for type_sum -- definitely was unaware of that command before! – Alexey Shiklomanov Sep 9 '16 at 14:45
  • 1
    Judging by the source code, it looks like for SQL dbs head(..., n) translates into a select statement with a limit of n rows. – TJ Mahr Sep 9 '16 at 16:19
4

Have a look at glimpse()

This is like a transposed version of print: columns run down the page, and data runs across. This makes it possible to see every column in a data frame. It's a little like str applied to a data frame but it tries to show you as much data as possible. (And it always shows the underlying data, even when applied to a remote data source.)

Which gives:

> glimpse(iris_tbl)
#Observations: NA
#Variables: 5
#$ Sepal.Length <dbl> 5.1, 4.9, 4.7, 4.6, 5.0, 5.4, 4.6, 5.0,...
#$ Sepal.Width  <dbl> 3.5, 3.0, 3.2, 3.1, 3.6, 3.9, 3.4, 3.4,...
#$ Petal.Length <dbl> 1.4, 1.4, 1.3, 1.5, 1.4, 1.7, 1.4, 1.5,...
#$ Petal.Width  <dbl> 0.2, 0.2, 0.2, 0.2, 0.2, 0.4, 0.3, 0.2,...
#$ Species      <chr> "setosa", "setosa", "setosa", "setosa",...

Should you want to get a vector you could do:

vapply(as.data.frame(head(iris_tbl)), typeof, character(1))

Which gives:

#Sepal.Length  Sepal.Width Petal.Length  Petal.Width      Species 
#    "double"     "double"     "double"     "double"  "character" 
  • Good command to know...but I still don't see how to actually access that "first column" containing the types without actually collecting a subset of the data. – Alexey Shiklomanov Sep 9 '16 at 14:46

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