1

So I have successfully converted almost all my project to Swift 3 besides from one View Controller where I manually add constraints.

I was getting errors for

    view.addSubview(textView)

    textView.translatesAutoresizingMaskIntoConstraints = false
    view.addSubview(textView)

    let views = ["textView": textView]
    var constraints = NSLayoutConstraint.constraints(withVisualFormat: "V:|-70-[textView]-8-|", options: NSLayoutFormatOptions(rawValue: 0), metrics: nil, views: views)
    constraints += NSLayoutConstraint.constraints(withVisualFormat: "H:|-8-[textView]-8-|", options: NSLayoutFormatOptions(rawValue: 0), metrics: nil, views: views)
    NSLayoutConstraint.activate(constraints)

So I changed it to

textView.translatesAutoresizingMaskIntoConstraints = true
view.addSubview(textView)

textView.center = CGPoint(x: view.bounds.midX, y: view.bounds.midY)
textView.autoresizingMask = [UIViewAutoresizing.flexibleLeftMargin, UIViewAutoresizing.flexibleRightMargin, UIViewAutoresizing.flexibleTopMargin, UIViewAutoresizing.flexibleBottomMargin]

All I am trying to do is add a UITextView to a UIView in a view controller so it takes up the entire height and width and stays vertically and horizontally in the centre. I'm clearly missing something obvious with my updated code and am unsure why my previous code was refusing to run as I worked in Swift 2.2.

Can anyone answer the correct way of adding constraints in Swift 3 ?

UPDATE:

Here's the error from my original code which was converted to Swift 3.0

2016-09-06 22:08:38.751636 APPNAME[570:65129] -[_SwiftValue nsli_superitem]: unrecognized selector sent to instance 0x17044a0e0 2016-09-06 22:08:38.752963 APPNAME[570:65129] * Terminating app due to uncaught exception 'NSInvalidArgumentException', reason: '-[_SwiftValue nsli_superitem]: unrecognized selector sent to instance 0x17044a0e0' * First throw call stack: (0x18430c1c0 0x182d4455c 0x184313278 0x184310278 0x18420a59c 0x184d42104 0x184d40948 0x184d3f79c 0x184d3f340 0x100221ec0 0x1002289ac 0x100228be8 0x18a0e5b08 0x18a19f4cc 0x18a19f3a4 0x18a19e6ec 0x18a19e138 0x18a19dcec 0x18a19dc50 0x18a0e2c78 0x1875ab40c 0x1875a00e8 0x18759ffa8 0x18751cc64 0x1875440d0 0x18a0d8348 0x1842b97dc 0x1842b740c 0x1842b789c 0x1841e6048 0x185c67198 0x18a150bd0 0x18a14b908 0x100171a04 0x1831c85b8) libc++abi.dylib: terminating with uncaught exception of type NSException (lldb)

  • What exactly errors did you get for your autolayout code? – Vladimir Sep 6 '16 at 21:02
  • @Vladimir I have added the error to the question – A.Roe Sep 6 '16 at 21:10
1

Your first code sample has a syntax error in this line:

textView.addConstraints(constraints: [NSLayoutConstraint])     

Presumably it's trying to create an empty array, but there's no point in adding an empty array of constraints, so just delete the line.

Note that your first code sample (with the erroneous line removed) doesn't meet your requirement (“takes up the entire height and width and stays vertically and horizontally in the centre”). You're specifying margins, so the text view won't take up the entire height and width, and the vertical margins are asymmetric, so it won't be centred vertically.

The problem in your second code sample is that you're using the wrong mask. For example, .flexibleLeftMargin tells the system to allow the distance between the left edge of view and the left edge of textView to change, but that is the opposite of what you want.

This should do what you want:

textView.frame = view.bounds
textView.autoresizingMask = [ .flexibleWidth, .flexibleWidth ]

If you want margins, set the frame like this:

var frame = view.bounds.insetBy(dx: 8, dy: 0)
frame.origin.y += 70
frame.size.height -= 78
textView.frame = frame

Note that the size of view must already be at least 16 by 78.

  • Yeah the first line you mentioned was just an error when copying code to my question, it was actually commented out for a different attempt; – A.Roe Sep 6 '16 at 21:12
  • Yes you are right, and now the text view is added and takes up the entire view, but now I realised why I specifically added constraints, because the top of the text view is covered by the navigation controller. How can I add 70 points to the top and 8 points left, right and centre ? – A.Roe Sep 6 '16 at 21:14
  • I have updated my answer. – rob mayoff Sep 6 '16 at 21:23
  • I'm having exact same problem as OP (-[SwiftValue nsli_superitem]: unrecognized selector) on adding layout constraints. Code was fine built using iOS9.3 SDK and Swift 2.2, and ran fine on iOS10 devices. I think the issue is more likely with iOS10 SDK than with the Swift2.2 to Swift3.0 change. Or are you able to make OP's first approach work with no errors? I'm not keen to use magic numbers and autoresizingMasks unless I _absolutely have to :-) – Peter Sep 12 '16 at 10:48
6

I had this error at the last line of the following code:

    scrollView = UIScrollView()
    scrollView.translatesAutoresizingMaskIntoConstraints = false
    self.view.addSubview(scrollView)

    contentView = UIView()
    contentView.translatesAutoresizingMaskIntoConstraints = false
    scrollView.addSubview(contentView)

    let viewDict = [
        "contentView": contentView,
        "scrollView": scrollView,
    ]

    let vFormat = "V:|[contentView]|"
    let constraints = NSLayoutConstraint.constraints(withVisualFormat: vFormat, options: [], metrics: nil, views: viewDict)

When I set the debugger at the last line, it shows the viewDict type as [String: UIView?] (notice the optional here).

The error does NOT occur when I change the declaration as follows:

    let viewDict: [String: UIView] = [
  • 1
    You just solved my problem! Thanks!! – Bruno Paulino Sep 15 '16 at 20:04
  • Boom! Fixed it for me as well! So annoying how they changed the behavior of optionals in Swift 3. – bgolson Sep 22 '16 at 16:03
  • This answer fixed my problem too. I was also able to change the code to: let viewDict = ["myView": myView!] (added exclamation point) to get rid of that error. – Mark Moeykens Oct 9 '16 at 19:49
0

If you want to keep using translatesAutoresizingMaskIntoConstraints=false, rather than the accepted answer, I note the following:

1) I get the errors you get when I generate NSLayoutConstraints using the visual formatting approach - code that compiled file in iOS9.3 SDK and ran fine on devices even those running iOS10 - building with iOS10 SDK crashes with your errors

2) If you change this to manually create the NSLayoutConstraints, e.g. similar to this, then it works as expected:

    var allConstraints = [NSLayoutConstraint]()
    allConstraints.append(NSLayoutConstraint(item: slideView, attribute: .left, relatedBy: .equal, toItem: slideButton, attribute: .left, multiplier: 1.0, constant: 0.0))
    allConstraints.append(NSLayoutConstraint(item: slideView, attribute: .right, relatedBy: .equal, toItem: slideButton, attribute: .right, multiplier: 1.0, constant: 0.0))
    allConstraints.append(NSLayoutConstraint(item: slideView, attribute: .top, relatedBy: .equal, toItem: slideButton, attribute: .top, multiplier: 1.0, constant: 0.0))
    allConstraints.append(NSLayoutConstraint(item: slideView, attribute: .bottom, relatedBy: .equal, toItem: slideButton, attribute: .bottom, multiplier: 1.0, constant: 0.0))
    NSLayoutConstraint.activate(allConstraints)

I don't know what the issue with the more elegant-looking visual formatting, but it appears bust at the moment (or there has been a change to the order of view layout code in iOS between 9.3 and 10).

  • I think it has to do with how the view dictionary is created, check out my answer. – Bart van Kuik Sep 16 '16 at 12:15

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