I'm working on some local/global memory optimization in OpenCL; after looking at this question from two years ago, I think I'm doing something wrong since local memory IO seems to be considerably slower than it should be. My GPU is an Intel HD 6000.

This is my testing setup, with kernel source:

__kernel void vecAdd(__global float* results, const unsigned int n, __local float* loc)
{
   int id = get_global_id(0);
   if(id < n) {
      float rtemp = 0;
      loc[23] = 34;
      for(int i = 0; i < 1024; i ++) {
         rtemp += loc[(i * 445) % 1024];
      }
      results[id] = rtemp;
   }
}

All the kernel does is take the local float array loc and add random values from it into a global output vector. The fragment "(i * 445) % 1024" is used to ensure the local memory is randomly accessed; performance is a little better (~30% speedup) than the figure mentioned at the end without the randomization.

  • I queued the kernel for 16777216 / 16M iterations, with a work group size of 256 and a local buffer of 1024 floats, all zeroes except l[23].

  • Overall, this makes a total of 16M * 1 = 16M writes and 16M * 1024 = 16G reads to the local memory.

  • There're also around 16M * 1024 * 2 floating point operations, likely more depending on how modulo is calculated, but the HD 6000 has floating point performance around 768 GFLOPS which shouldn't be a bottleneck.

  • 16G reads of float values lead to 64G of memory being read; execution of the kernel took 453945 μs to complete, giving an estimated local memory bandwidth of 151 GB/s.

The figures thrown around in the referenced question suggest that modern graphics cards (from 2014) potentially have much higher memory bandwidth than I measured on my machine; the figure quoted in the article (which may have been a random example for comparison) was 3-4 TB/s; while my card is an integrated card as opposed to dedicated, this still seems like a slow figure considering it's release in 2015.

To make things even more confusing, I'm getting worse performance on some dedicated mid-range GPUs: both an AMD R9 m370x and an Nvidia GT 750m took 700-800 ms. These are slightly older cards than Intel's HD 6000, so that could have something to do with it.

Is there any potential way to squeeze more performance out of local memory, or am I utilizing local memory as efficiently as possible?

closed as too broad by too honest for this site, doqtor, greg-449, EdChum, user5735775 Sep 9 '16 at 15:40

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  • I think 3-4TB/s of local memory is insane. I do not know where if comes from, but it the device is capable of just 700 GFLOP/s, it is literally impossible to have 4TB/s of transfer speed. From a HW desing point of view, it means the memory is overdesigned, able to provide x4 more data than the ALUs can process. It would make more sense that is 4Tb/s or 200GB/s. Similar to what you are obtaining. – DarkZeros Sep 7 '16 at 12:24
  • Approaching to bandwidth limit, not a single computation could be done; and similary when approaching to compute limit, not a single cache operation could be done. – huseyin tugrul buyukisik Sep 7 '16 at 14:16
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Intel HD 6000 has two slices with three subslices each, each subslice separately connected to Shared Local Memory (see diagram here http://www.notebookcheck.net/Intel-HD-Graphics-6000.125588.0.html ) with a bandwidth of 64 bytes per cycle, so assuming 1 GHz clock, you get 6 * 64 * 1 GHz = 384 GB/s of peak BW from local memory. You get that if you are hitting every one of 16 banks of local memory (local memory is highly banked so you could fetch 4 bytes per cycle from each bank independently). You get that kind of pattern with loc[id] access or something like that. Download Intel SDK for OpenCL https://software.intel.com/en-us/intel-opencl - it gives you the assembly view among other things: your code will be compiled SIMD32, but the assembly your code generates is pretty horrible, since you keep pounding the same location from every SIMD lane, so you are lucky that you got as high as 151 GB/s.

  • Thanks, this is great information? How would I go about calculating the expected (peak) local memory bandwidth from an Nvidia card like the GTX 1070 that doesn't have architectural data like "slices" and "subslices" listed? – Lukas Palmer Sep 7 '16 at 19:46
  • Sorry, Lukas, I am an Intel guy :) Maybe someone else here knows Nvidia hardware. – Robert Ioffe Sep 9 '16 at 0:43

Answer is at edit2 part at the end of answer.

If dedicated gpu timings are bad, you can try pipelining read+compute+write operations like

enter image description here

from left to right, it starts overlapped operations in the second step so compute latency is hidden, then third step hides write latency too. This is an example of dividing a seperable work into 4 parts. Maybe more parts give slower result that should be benchmarked per device. Kernel execution is just an "adding" so it is always hidden but heavier ones may not be. This decreases I/O latencies if that graphics card can do read and write at the same time. Picture also shows idle(vertically empty) timelines because of redundant synchronizations to make it more readable than a packed but faster version.

Your igpu 151 GB/s bandwidth could be cpu-cache. It doesnt have addressable register space so even using __private registers could make it fetch from cache. Also caches have different line widths per cpu or gpu.

loc[23] = 34;

has race condition by multiple threads and gets serialized.

And there is a possibility of

for(int i = 0; i < 1024; i ++) { rtemp += loc[(i * 445) % 1024]; }

being unrolled automatically and putting pressure on instruction cache and cache/memory. You could try different levels of unrolling.

Are you sure 8 cores per execution unit of that igpu, utilized? Maybe only 1 core per EU is used that may not be enough for fully stressing cache/memory(such as cache line collision by using all 1st cores but nothing else)? Try with float8 version instead of just float. Latest intel cpus have over a TB per second.

GFLOPS limit is rarely approached. Around %50 with optimized code, %75 with unreadeable code, %90 with no-meaningful code.


Edit: below code was run on an AMD-R7-240 card at 900MHz(no more than 30 GB/s memory and 600 GFlops) for 16M elements of results.

        __kernel void vecAdd(__global float* results )
        {
           int id = get_global_id(0);
           __local float loc[1024]; // some devices may slow with this
           if(id < (4096*4096)) {
              float rtemp = 0;
              loc[23] = 34;
              for(int i = 0; i < 1024; i ++) {
                 rtemp += loc[(i * 445) % 1024];
              }
              results[id] = rtemp;
           }
        }

it took

  • 575 milliseconds(no pipeline) to write+compute+read
  • 530 milliseconds(2-part pipelined) to write+compute+read
  • 510 milliseconds(8-part pipelined) to write+compute+read
  • 455 milliseconds to compute (140 GB/s local memory bandwidth )

Edit2: optimizing for cache line utilization, compute simplification and less bubbles in shader cores:

        __kernel void vecAdd(__global float* results )
        {
           int id = get_global_id(0);
           int idL = get_local_id(0);
           __local float loc[1024];
           float rtemp = 0;
           if(id < (4096*4096)) {

              loc[23] = 34;
           }

           barrier (CLK_LOCAL_MEM_FENCE);

           if(id < (4096*4096)) {
              for(int i = 0; i < 1024; i ++) {
                 rtemp += loc[(i * 445+ idL) & 1023];
              }
              results[id] = rtemp;
           }
        }
  • 325 milliseconds (16-part pipelined) to write+compute+read
  • 270 milliseconds to compute (235 GB/s local memory bandwidth )

loc[(i * 445) % 1024];

is same for all threads, all random but changing to same value at each step, accessing through same cache line. Adding a local variation to all threads but having same summation in the end, uses more lines.

% 1024

is optimized with

&1023

lastly, barrier to elliminate any instruction bubbles in SIMD after loc[23] = 34;

Edit3: Adding some loop-unrolling and increasing local work group size from 64 to 256 (edit and edit2 were 64)

        __kernel void vecAdd(__global float* results )
        {
           int id = get_global_id(0);
           int idL = get_local_id(0);
           __local float loc[1024];
           float rtemp = 0;
           float rtemp2 = 0;
           float rtemp3 = 0;
           float rtemp4 = 0;
           if(id < (4096*4096)) {

              loc[23] = 34;
           }

           barrier (CLK_LOCAL_MEM_FENCE);

           if(id < (4096*4096)) {
              int higherLimitOfI=1024*445+idL;
              int lowerLimitOfI=idL;
              int stepSize=445*4;
              for(int i = lowerLimitOfI; i < higherLimitOfI; i+=stepSize) {
                 rtemp += loc[i & 1023];
                 rtemp2 += loc[(i+445) & 1023];
                 rtemp3 += loc[(i+445*2) & 1023];
                 rtemp4 += loc[(i+445*3) & 1023];
              }
              results[id] = rtemp+rtemp2+rtemp3+rtemp4;
           }
        }
  • 290 milliseconds (8-part pipelined) to write+compute+read without redundant sync(forgot this at other benchmarks)
  • 278 miliseconds on pci-e 2.0 8x instead of 4x
  • 249 milliseconds on 4 queues(rcw + rcw + rcw + rcw) with no events instead of 3 queues(r+c+w) with event flow. (32 parts for each queue so 128x rcw parts total )
  • 243 milliseconds to compute + (map/unmap instead of read/write)
  • 240 milliseconds to compute (264 GB/s local memory bandwidth )
  • 1410 ms for Intel(R) HD Graphics 400 @ 600 MHz (45 GB/s)
    • warning: it is the __global array access

    results[id] = ...

    __global array access is bottleneck for this device for this algorithm.

    230 ms instead of 1410 ms for HD 400 !!!! (this should be cache/local bandwidth)

  • 12 compute units each with 8 cores =>96 cores 45 GB/s means 1 core 0.5 GB/s @600 MHz or **nearly 1 byte per core per clock**
  • Your igpu can read 1B per core per 3 cycles but it has 384 cores total => **192 GB/s (you are close to limit)**
  • Look at this picture, it writes 64B per slice which means 64 bytes per 192 cores per cycle or 192bytes read per 192 cores per 3 cycles:

- VGPR usage limits kernel occupancy to %60 according to profiler. enter image description here

  • Thanks for the thorough (and quick) response! You mention that the use of __private registers, which in this case would be rtemp if I inderstand correctly, isn't supported on the iGPU and forces GPU-CPU communication-- how would this account for similar performance on nvidia GPUs? Thank you for the float8 suggestion; it doesn't seem to be affecting performance, but I'll try some different access methods with it and see what happens. Omitting "loc[23] = 34;" also doesn't seem to affect performance; the execution takes the same amount of time with the default values of zero for the local array. – Lukas Palmer Sep 6 '16 at 23:15
  • I moved rtemp to local memory and execution time doubled; changing it back to private cut execution time back down, which hopefully rules out private registers being a bottleneck. – Lukas Palmer Sep 6 '16 at 23:22
  • After some checking of glGetDeviceIDs and clGetDeviceInfo I was using the integrated intel GPUs on the machines I tested on instead of the Nvidia / AMD dGPUs, which led to times around 35% faster than mine-- at this point there's a strong case for 150 GB/s being a typical local memory speed. Was the figure you used a one you've seen, or just an example to illustrate the point you were making? – Lukas Palmer Sep 6 '16 at 23:49
  • @LukasPalmer added the answer at the end, please check. – huseyin tugrul buyukisik Sep 7 '16 at 11:20
  • great! In my case it still seems like global memory is only around half as fast as local memory, even without optimization, but this is some good information! I didn't think about all the threads looking in the same spot, the idL trick fixed that. – Lukas Palmer Sep 7 '16 at 13:53

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