66

I'm learning TypeScript using this ebook as a reference. I've checked the TypeScript Official Documentation but I don't find information about enum flags.

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  • 1
    The FileAccess example given in the document you reference is an example of this. The very page in the ebook you reference has a section called "enums as flags", which describes what you are looking for, in even more detail than the answer below, including how to add flags using |= etc.
    – user663031
    Sep 7, 2016 at 3:47

6 Answers 6

143

They're a way to efficiently store and represent a collection of boolean values.

For example, taking this flags enum:

enum Traits {
    None = 0,
    Friendly = 1 << 0, // 0001 -- the bitshift is unnecessary, but done for consistency
    Mean = 1 << 1,     // 0010
    Funny = 1 << 2,    // 0100
    Boring = 1 << 3,   // 1000
    All = ~(~0 << 4)   // 1111
}

Instead of only being able to represent a single value like so:

let traits = Traits.Mean;

We can represent multiple values in a single variable:

let traits = Traits.Mean | Traits.Funny; // (0010 | 0100) === 0110

Then test for them individually:

if ((traits & Traits.Mean) === Traits.Mean) {
    console.log(":(");
}
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  • 7
    let traits = Traits.Mean | Traits.Funny now traits variable will have multiple values, how to do the reverse ? I will have 6 how to convert to Traits.Mean | Traits.Funny ? Mar 6, 2018 at 7:49
  • 2
    traits &= ~Traits.Funny; Would make it Mean and not Funny.
    – JBrooks
    Feb 21, 2019 at 2:42
  • Would the same syntax apply when you have more then 6 flags?
    – Nieksa
    Feb 28, 2019 at 9:30
  • 1
    Mean and Friendly? How's that possible? Jokes aside, good answer, though.
    – Xwtek
    Jun 6, 2020 at 1:34
  • 3
    @Nieksa yes, the same answer would apply. The only limitation is the size (in bits) of the underlying type, which is a 32 bit integer (and therefore supports 32 flags). This isn't quite the same as in a language like C#, where the underlying type can simply be changed. In js/ts, all bitwise operations behave as if the value size is 32 bits (even though in practice it is 64), so a special library would be needed to handle a 64-bit enum.
    – Daniel
    Apr 8, 2021 at 20:37
44

The official documentation has this example that I will add some details that are crucial to use enum and flags.

enum FileAccess {
    None,
    Read    = 1 << 1,
    Write   = 1 << 2,
}

In TypeScript, you can assign a value directly with =

let x:FileAccess = FileAccess.Read;

But this might override previous values. To get around that you can use |= to append a flag.

x |= FileAccess.Write;

At this point, the variable x is Read and Write. You can remove a value by using the ampersand and tilde:

x &= ~FileAccess.Read;

Finally, you can compare to see if one of the value is set to the variable. The accepted answer is not right. It should not just use the ampersand symbol but also check with === to the desired value. The reason is the ampersand returns a number, not a boolean.

console.log(FileAccess.Write === (x & FileAccess.Write)); // Return true
console.log(FileAccess.Read === (x & FileAccess.Read)); // Return false
0
1

You can check this solution, that add some infra, but if you will use it a lot it really nice, the usage goes like that:

let FlaggedExample: IFlaggedEnum = FlaggedEnum.create(Example, 1 << 2);  // class definition

let example = new FlaggedExample(3); // Alpha,Beta instance of the class
export module FlaggedEnum {
    "use strict";
    export interface IFlaggedEnumGenerator {
        (_enum: any, _max: number): IFlaggedEnum;
    }

    export interface IFlaggedEnum {
        (val: IFlaggedEnum): void;
        (val: number): void;
        (val: string): void;

        /** array of the individual enum flags that represent the value 
         */
        toArray(): IFlaggedEnum[];

        /** does this instance contain all the flags of the value 
         */
        contains(val: IFlaggedEnum): boolean;
        contains(val: number): boolean;
        contains(val: string): boolean;

        /** adds the flags to the value and returns a new instance 
         */
        add(val: IFlaggedEnum): IFlaggedEnum;
        add(val: number): IFlaggedEnum;
        add(val: string): IFlaggedEnum;

        /** removes the flags from the value and returns a new instance 
         */
        remove(val: IFlaggedEnum): IFlaggedEnum;
        remove(val: number): IFlaggedEnum;
        remove(val: string): IFlaggedEnum;

        /** returns an instance containing all intersecting flags 
         */
        intersect(val: IFlaggedEnum): IFlaggedEnum;
        intersect(val: number): IFlaggedEnum;
        intersect(val: string): IFlaggedEnum;

        /** does the two instances equal each other 
         */
        equals(val: IFlaggedEnum): boolean;
        equals(val: number): boolean;
        equals(val: string): boolean;

    }

    /** create a class definition for a Flagged Enum
     * @method create
     * @param _enum {enum} The enum definition being exteded
     * @param _max {number} the maximum possible value of the enum being extended
     * @returns {IFlaggedEnum} the class definition for the provided enum
     */
    export var create: IFlaggedEnumGenerator = function (_enum: any, _max: number): IFlaggedEnum {

        var base: any = _enum,
            max: number = _max;

        var Base: IFlaggedEnum = <any>function (val: any): void {
            if (typeof (val) === "string") {
                val = base[val];
            }
            this.value = val + 0;
        };

        var proto: any = Base.prototype;

        proto.valueOf = function (): number { return <number>this.value; };
        proto.toString = function (): string {
            var list: string[] = [];
            for (var i: number = 1; i < max; i = i << 1) {
                if ((this.value & i) !== 0) {
                    list.push(base[i]);
                }
            }
            return list.toString();
        };

        proto.toArray = function (): IFlaggedEnum[] {
            var list: IFlaggedEnum[] = [];
            for (var i: number = 1; i < max; i = i << 1) {
                if ((this.value & i) !== 0) {
                    list.push(new Base(i));
                }
            }
            return list;
        };

        proto.contains = function (val: any): boolean {
            if (typeof (val) === "string") {
                val = base[val];
            }
            return (this.value & val) === (val + 0);
        };

        proto.add = function (val: any): IFlaggedEnum {
            if (typeof (val) === "string") {
                val = base[val];
            }
            return new Base(this.value | val);
        };

        proto.remove = function (val: any): IFlaggedEnum {
            if (typeof (val) === "string") {
                val = this.base[val];
            }
            return new Base((this.value ^ val) & this.value);
        };

        proto.intersect = function (val: any): IFlaggedEnum {
            if (typeof (val) === "string") {
                val = base[val];
            }
            var final: number = 0;
            for (var i: number = 1; i < max; i = (i << 1)) {
                if ((this.value & i) !== 0 && (val & i) !== 0) {
                    final += i;
                }
            }
            return new Base(final);
        };

        proto.equals = function (val: any): boolean {
            if (typeof (val) === "string") {
                val = base[val];
            }
            return this.value === (val + 0);
        };

        return Base;

    };
}
0

You can just use the bit values do define your enum

enum FileAccess {
    None    = 0,
    Read    = 1,
    Write   = 2,
    Active  = 4,
    Failed  = 8
}
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  • 1
    You're not wrong but this question has been answered 5 years ago and assigning bit-shifted values is the more maintainable solution here.
    – DustInComp
    Nov 11, 2021 at 11:40
-1

Flags allow you to check if a certain condition from a set of conditions is true. This is a common programming pattern in various other programming languages e.g. here is an example about C# : Using Bitwise operators on flags

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    But the question was about TypeScript, and specifically using flags in an enum context.
    – user663031
    Sep 7, 2016 at 5:15
-2
enum Info{
    None = 0,
    glass= 1 << 0, // 0001 -- the bitshift is unnecessary, but done for consistency
    plastic= 1 << 1,     // 0010

}

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