183

Question

What is the most elegant way to get @ViewChild after corresponding element in template was shown?

Below is an example. Also Plunker available.

Template:

<div id="layout" *ngIf="display">
    <div #contentPlaceholder></div>
</div>

Component:

export class AppComponent {

    display = false;
    @ViewChild('contentPlaceholder', {read: ViewContainerRef}) viewContainerRef;

    show() {
        this.display = true;
        console.log(this.viewContainerRef); // undefined
        setTimeout(()=> {
            console.log(this.viewContainerRef); // OK
        }, 1);
    }
}

I have a component with its contents hidden by default. When someone calls show() method it becomes visible. However, before Angular 2 change detection completes, I can not reference to viewContainerRef. I usually wrap all required actions into setTimeout(()=>{},1) as shown above. Is there a more correct way?

I know there is an option with ngAfterViewChecked, but it causes too much useless calls.

ANSWER (Plunker)

  • 3
    did you try using [hidden] attribute instead of *ngIf? It worked for me for a similar situation. – Shardul Jan 27 '17 at 21:39

13 Answers 13

293

The accepted answer using a QueryList did not work for me. However what did work was using a setter for the ViewChild:

 private contentPlaceholder: ElementRef;

 @ViewChild('contentPlaceholder') set content(content: ElementRef) {
    this.contentPlaceholder = content;
 }

The setter is called once *ngIf becomes true.

  • 25
    note that this setter is called initially with undefined content, so check for null if doing something in the setter – Recep Jun 30 '17 at 9:10
  • 1
    Good answer, but contentPlaceholder is ElementRef not ViewContainerRef. – developer033 Sep 9 '17 at 17:49
  • 5
    How do you call the setter? – Leandro Cusack Nov 6 '18 at 19:12
  • 1
    The setter name content is important or we can rename it? What if you have many elements like this? You'll see "Duplicate identifier 'content'" – zhuhang.jasper Oct 21 '19 at 2:56
  • 1
    @zhuhang.jasper the setter name is not important. I had two instances of @ViewChild, and simply named the setters content1 and content2 with success. – Minyc510 Oct 25 '19 at 14:51
98

An alternative to overcome this is running the change detector manually.

You first inject the ChangeDetectorRef:

constructor(private changeDetector : ChangeDetectorRef) {}

Then you call it after updating the variable that controls the *ngIf

show() {
        this.display = true;
        this.changeDetector.detectChanges();
    }
  • Thanks! I was using the accepted answer but it was still causing an error because the children were still undefined when I tried to use them sometime after onInit(), so I added the detectChanges before calling any child function and it fixed it. (I used both the accepted answer and this answer) – Minyc510 Oct 25 '19 at 14:52
22

Angular 8

You should add { static: false } as a second option for @ViewChild

Example:

export class AppComponent {

    @ViewChild('contentPlaceholder', { static: false }) contentPlaceholder: ElementRef;

    display = false;

    constructor(private changeDetectorRef: ChangeDetectorRef) {

    }

    show() {
        this.display = true;
        this.changeDetectorRef.detectChanges();
        console.log(this.contentPlaceholder);
    }
}

Stackblitz example: https://stackblitz.com/edit/angular-d8ezsn

  • 1
    Thank you Sviatoslav. Tried everything above but only your solution worked. – Peter Drinnan Aug 22 '19 at 1:23
  • This also worked for me (as did the viewchildren trick). This one is more intuitive and easier for angular 8. – Alex Aug 28 '19 at 21:06
  • 1
    Worked like a charm :) – Sandeep K Nair Sep 6 '19 at 10:21
  • 1
    This should be the accepted answer for the latest version. – Krishna Prashatt Sep 30 '19 at 11:51
  • I am using <mat-horizontal-stepper *ngIf="viewMode === DialogModeEnum['New']" linear #stepper, @ViewChild('stepper', {static: true}) private stepper: MatStepper; and this.changeDetector.detectChanges(); and it still doesn't work. – Paul Strupeikis Oct 6 '19 at 22:45
21

The answers above did not work for me because in my project, the ngIf is on an input element. I needed access to the nativeElement attribute in order to focus on the input when ngIf is true. There seems to be no nativeElement attribute on ViewContainerRef. Here is what I did (following @ViewChild documentation):

<button (click)='showAsset()'>Add Asset</button>
<div *ngIf='showAssetInput'>
    <input #assetInput />
</div>

...

private assetInputElRef:ElementRef;
@ViewChild('assetInput') set assetInput(elRef: ElementRef) {
    this.assetInputElRef = elRef;
}

...

showAsset() {
    this.showAssetInput = true;
    setTimeout(() => { this.assetInputElRef.nativeElement.focus(); });
}

I used setTimeout before focusing because the ViewChild takes a sec to be assigned. Otherwise it would be undefined.

  • 2
    A setTimeout() of 0 worked for me. My element hidden by my ngIf was correctly bound after a setTimeout, without the need for the set assetInput() function in the middle. – Will Shaver Sep 6 '17 at 21:41
  • You can detectChanges in showAsset() and not have to use the timeout. – WrksOnMyMachine Jun 12 '19 at 21:36
  • How's this an answer? The OP already mentioned using a setTimeout? I usually wrap all required actions into setTimeout(()=>{},1) as shown above. Is there a more correct way? – Juan Mendes Jan 17 at 11:35
11

As was mention by other, the fastest and quickest solution is to use [hidden] instead of *ngIf, this way the component will be created but not visible, there for you can have access to it, though it might not be the most efficient way.

  • you have to note that using "[hidden]" may not work if the element is not of "display: block". better use [style.display]="condition ? '' : 'none'" – Félix Brunet May 8 '19 at 19:29
9

This could work but I don't know if it's convenient for your case:

@ViewChildren('contentPlaceholder', {read: ViewContainerRef}) viewContainerRefs: QueryList;

ngAfterViewInit() {
 this.viewContainerRefs.changes.subscribe(item => {
   if(this.viewContainerRefs.toArray().length) {
     // shown
   }
 })
}
  • 1
    Can you please try ngAfterViewInit() instead of ngOnInit(). I assumed that viewContainerRefs is already initialized but doesn't yet contain items. Seems I remembered this wrong. – Günter Zöchbauer Sep 7 '16 at 10:37
  • Sorry, I was wrong. AfterViewInit actually works. I've removed all my comments in order not to confuse people. Here is a working Plunker: plnkr.co/edit/myu7qXonmpA2hxxU3SLB?p=preview – sinedsem Sep 7 '16 at 11:30
  • 1
    This is actually a good answer. It works and I'm using this now. Thanks! – Konstantin Jul 11 '19 at 16:14
  • @Konstantin thanks for the feedback :) – Günter Zöchbauer Jul 11 '19 at 18:02
  • 1
    This worked for me after upgrade from angular 7 to 8. For some reason, the upgrade caused the component to be undefined in afterViewInit even with using static: false per the new ViewChild syntax when the component was wrapped in an ngIf. Also note that the QueryList requires a type now like this QueryList<YourComponentType>; – Alex Aug 28 '19 at 21:01
9

Another quick "trick" (easy solution) is just to use [hidden] tag instead of *ngIf, just important to know that in that case Angular build the object and paint it under class:hidden this is why the ViewChild work without a problem. So it's important to keep in mind that you should not use hidden on heavy or expensive items that can cause performance issue

  <div class="addTable" [hidden]="CONDITION">
  • If that hidden is inside in another if then need to change many things – VIKAS KOHLI Dec 19 '19 at 7:15
4

My goal was to avoid any hacky methods that assume something (e.g. setTimeout) and I ended up implementing the accepted solution with a bit of RxJS flavour on top:

  private ngUnsubscribe = new Subject();
  private tabSetInitialized = new Subject();
  public tabSet: TabsetComponent;
  @ViewChild('tabSet') set setTabSet(tabset: TabsetComponent) {
    if (!!tabSet) {
      this.tabSet = tabSet;
      this.tabSetInitialized.next();
    }
  }

  ngOnInit() {
    combineLatest(
      this.route.queryParams,
      this.tabSetInitialized
    ).pipe(
      takeUntil(this.ngUnsubscribe)
    ).subscribe(([queryParams, isTabSetInitialized]) => {
      let tab = [undefined, 'translate', 'versions'].indexOf(queryParams['view']);
      this.tabSet.tabs[tab > -1 ? tab : 0].active = true;
    });
  }

My scenario: I wanted to fire an action on a @ViewChild element depending on the router queryParams. Due to a wrapping *ngIf being false until the HTTP request returns the data, the initialization of the @ViewChild element happens with a delay.

How does it work: combineLatest emits a value for the first time only when each of the provided Observables emit the first value since the moment combineLatest was subscribed to. My Subject tabSetInitialized emits a value when the @ViewChild element is being set. Therewith, I delay the execution of the code under subscribe until the *ngIf turns positive and the @ViewChild gets initialized.

Of course don't forget to unsubscribe on ngOnDestroy, I do it using the ngUnsubscribe Subject:

  ngOnDestroy() {
    this.ngUnsubscribe.next();
    this.ngUnsubscribe.complete();
  }
  • thanks a lot I've had the same issue, with tabSet & ngIf, your method saved me a lot of time and headache. Cheers m8 ;) – Alex Bene Dec 5 '19 at 10:41
3

A simplified version, I had a similar issue to this when using the Google Maps JS SDK.

My solution was to extract the divand ViewChild into it's own child component which when used in the parent component was able to be hid/displayed using an *ngIf.

Before

HomePageComponent Template

<div *ngIf="showMap">
  <div #map id="map" class="map-container"></div>
</div>

HomePageComponent Component

@ViewChild('map') public mapElement: ElementRef; 

public ionViewDidLoad() {
    this.loadMap();
});

private loadMap() {

  const latLng = new google.maps.LatLng(-1234, 4567);
  const mapOptions = {
    center: latLng,
    zoom: 15,
    mapTypeId: google.maps.MapTypeId.ROADMAP,
  };
   this.map = new google.maps.Map(this.mapElement.nativeElement, mapOptions);
}

public toggleMap() {
  this.showMap = !this.showMap;
 }

After

MapComponent Template

 <div>
  <div #map id="map" class="map-container"></div>
</div>

MapComponent Component

@ViewChild('map') public mapElement: ElementRef; 

public ngOnInit() {
    this.loadMap();
});

private loadMap() {

  const latLng = new google.maps.LatLng(-1234, 4567);
  const mapOptions = {
    center: latLng,
    zoom: 15,
    mapTypeId: google.maps.MapTypeId.ROADMAP,
  };
   this.map = new google.maps.Map(this.mapElement.nativeElement, mapOptions);
}

HomePageComponent Template

<map *ngIf="showMap"></map>

HomePageComponent Component

public toggleMap() {
  this.showMap = !this.showMap;
 }
1

In my case I needed to load a whole module only when the div existed in the template, meaning the outlet was inside an ngif. This way everytime angular detected the element #geolocalisationOutlet it created the component inside of it. The module only loads once as well.

constructor(
    public wlService: WhitelabelService,
    public lmService: LeftMenuService,
    private loader: NgModuleFactoryLoader,
    private injector: Injector
) {
}

@ViewChild('geolocalisationOutlet', {read: ViewContainerRef}) set geolocalisation(geolocalisationOutlet: ViewContainerRef) {
    const path = 'src/app/components/engine/sections/geolocalisation/geolocalisation.module#GeolocalisationModule';
    this.loader.load(path).then((moduleFactory: NgModuleFactory<any>) => {
        const moduleRef = moduleFactory.create(this.injector);
        const compFactory = moduleRef.componentFactoryResolver
            .resolveComponentFactory(GeolocalisationComponent);
        if (geolocalisationOutlet && geolocalisationOutlet.length === 0) {
            geolocalisationOutlet.createComponent(compFactory);
        }
    });
}

<div *ngIf="section === 'geolocalisation'" id="geolocalisation">
     <div #geolocalisationOutlet></div>
</div>
1

I think using defer from lodash makes a lot of sense especially in my case where my @ViewChild() was inside async pipe

0

Working on Angular 8 No need to import ChangeDector

ngIf allows you not to load the element and avoid adding more stress to your application. Here's how I got it running without ChangeDetector

elem: ElementRef;

@ViewChild('elemOnHTML', {static: false}) set elemOnHTML(elemOnHTML: ElementRef) {
    if (!!elemOnHTML) {
      this.elem = elemOnHTML;
    }
}

Then when I change my ngIf value to be truthy I would use setTimeout like this for it to wait only for the next change cycle:

  this.showElem = true;
  console.log(this.elem); // undefined here
  setTimeout(() => {
    console.log(this.elem); // back here through ViewChild set
    this.elem.do();
  });

This also allowed me to avoid using any additional libraries or imports.

0

for Angular 8 - a mixture of null checking and @ViewChild static: false hackery

for a paging control waiting for async data

@ViewChild(MatPaginator, { static: false }) set paginator(paginator: MatPaginator) {
  if(!paginator) return;
  paginator.page.pipe(untilDestroyed(this)).subscribe(pageEvent => {
    const updated: TSearchRequest = {
      pageRef: pageEvent.pageIndex,
      pageSize: pageEvent.pageSize
    } as any;
    this.dataGridStateService.alterSearchRequest(updated);
  });
}

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