2

I am using sample() function to obtain a random sample from a dice object.

> die
[1] 1 2 3 4 5 6
> sample(x=die , size=1 , replace=TRUE)
[1] 1
> sample(x=die , size=1 , replace=TRUE)
[1] 1
> sample(x=die , size=1 , replace=TRUE)
[1] 5
> sample(x=die , size=1 , replace=TRUE)
[1] 5
> sample(x=die , size=1 , replace=TRUE)
[1] 1
> sample(x=die , size=1 , replace=TRUE)
[1] 2
> sample(x=die , size=1 , replace=TRUE)
[1] 4

If you observe above output 1 repeated 3 times and 5 repeated 2 times. But from above output even replace TRUE I could see frequent multiple duplications.

Ref: I am reading a book named Hands-On Programming with R.

Please let me know if more information required.

Thank you.

3 Answers 3

5

This is not a statistical, but a programming question and would be better suited for Stack Overflow.

You are using sample() incorrectly if your goal is to avoid getting the same number twice. To avoid repetitions, you need to create the sample with a single command (size more than 1 instead of multiple commands) and using replace=FALSE (not TRUE). For example:

> sample(x=die , size=4 , replace=FALSE)
[1] 1 6 4 3

Of course, this no longer corresponds to multiple fair dice rolls, as real dice can give you the same number in subsequent rolls.

See the help page ?sample for full information on how to use sample().

0
3

If you take real dice and roll them, you will see duplications as well. Each side of the dice has the same chance to come up each time, no matter if that means duplication or not.

The replace= argument has no effect at all, when size=1, as after you have drawn one side of the dice, it makes no difference, whether you replace that or not. replace=FALSE will prevent duplicates whithin that one call of sample(). It will not influence the next call of sample.

1
  • 1
    And whether by co-incidence or not he did it 7 times which with a six-sided die ............
    – mdewey
    Commented Sep 2, 2016 at 13:18
1

Sample() doesn't affect subsequent runs of sample() on the same vector. What you need is a function that progressively removes your pics from the vector you are analyzing. Here I wrote something like it, called rsample(), which returns the object taken and the new vector, deprived of the selected object.

rsample<-function(x){
    taken<-sample(x,size=1)
    newx<-x[-which(x==taken)[1]]
    return(list(taken=taken,new=newx))
}
die<-1:6
obj<-rsample(die)
obj$taken
[1] 3
obj<-rsample(obj$new)
obj$taken
[1] 5
obj<-rsample(obj$new)
obj$taken
[1] 2
obj<-rsample(obj$new)
obj$taken
[1] 4
obj<-rsample(obj$new)
obj$taken
[1] 1
6
  • May be we can use this to avoid duplicate elements in a 1-D vector data along with sample() function as vector length as conditional value.
    – Raja G
    Commented Sep 2, 2016 at 13:23
  • No , 1-D+Sample() but no duplicate repetitions till vector length samplings. Hope you understand.
    – Raja G
    Commented Sep 2, 2016 at 13:25
  • @Raja Isn't that much more simply achieved with replicate = FALSE?
    – Bernhard
    Commented Sep 2, 2016 at 13:26
  • @Raja sample(1:n, size=n, replace=FALSE) will never have repetitions in the returned values.
    – Bernhard
    Commented Sep 2, 2016 at 13:28
  • 3
    Wouldn't it be simply far easier to call sample(die, 6, replace = FALSE)? Commented Sep 2, 2016 at 13:38

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.