3

Following code works well and print "5.0"

$x : Float64
$y : Float64
$x = 3.0_f64
$y = 2.0_f64
puts $x + $y

Now, I change the code to support "nil".

$x : Float64?
$y : Float64?
$x = 3.0_f64
$y = 2.0_f64
puts $x + $y if !$x.nil? && !$y.nil?

However this code reports the following error message.

no overload matches 'Float64#+' with type (Float64 | Nil)
Overloads are:
 - Float64#+(other : Int8)
 - Float64#+(other : Int16)
 - Float64#+(other : Int32)
 - Float64#+(other : Int64)
 - Float64#+(other : UInt8)
 - Float64#+(other : UInt16)
 - Float64#+(other : UInt32)
 - Float64#+(other : UInt64)
 - Float64#+(other : Float32)
 - Float64#+(other : Float64)
 - Number#+()
Couldn't find overloads for these types:
 - Float64#+(Nil)

    puts $x + $y if !$x.nil? && !$y.nil?

I would like to stop the call of method "#+()" if $x or $y is nil and print the calculated result if both are Float64.

What is the best practice for this situation?


In above code, I simplified the code for this question. In the result, the meaning of question was changed involuntarily.. I wanted to ask following code actually.

class Xyz
  property a, b
  @a : Float64?
  @b : Float64?

  def initialize
    @a = nil
    @b = nil
  end

  def do_calc
    if !@a.nil? && !@b.nil?
      puts @a + @b
    else
      puts "We can't calculate because '@a or @b has nil."
    end
  end
end

x = Xyz.new
x.a = 3.0_f64
x.b = 2.0_f64
x.do_calc

This code, reports following error.

instantiating 'Xyz#do_calc()'

x.do_calc
  ^~~~~~~

in ./a.cr:15: no overload matches 'Float64#+' with type (Float64 | Nil)
Overloads are:
 - Float64#+(other : Int8)
 - Float64#+(other : Int16)
 - Float64#+(other : Int32)
 - Float64#+(other : Int64)
 - Float64#+(other : UInt8)
 - Float64#+(other : UInt16)
 - Float64#+(other : UInt32)
 - Float64#+(other : UInt64)
 - Float64#+(other : Float32)
 - Float64#+(other : Float64)
 - Number#+()
Couldn't find overloads for these types:
 - Float64#+(Nil)

      puts @a + @b

How can I avoid this error?

4

Be sure to read the docs about if, and checking for nil: https://crystal-lang.org/docs/syntax_and_semantics/if_var.html and https://crystal-lang.org/docs/syntax_and_semantics/if_var_nil.html

This only applies to local variables, so you'll need to assign the values to local variables first.

As a side note, global variables don't exist anymore in the language as of Crystal 0.19.0.

  • Thank you for your question. I simplified the code for this question. In the result, the meaning of the question was changed involuntarily.. I added the question I wanted to ask actually.. – elgoog Sep 7 '16 at 22:24
  • I found the answer in the link you specified. Sorry for the duplicated question. – elgoog Sep 7 '16 at 22:47
0

I think it happens because the compile can't infer the type inside the if clause, it's not like a dynamically typed language. What if @a type is a Nil? We don't have + operator for Nil type. Thus, you have state that @a and @b are a Float64 explicitly.

class Xyz
  property a, b
  @a : Float64?
  @b : Float64?

  def initialize
    @a = nil
    @b = nil
  end

  def do_calc
    if !@a.nil? && !@b.nil?
      puts @a.as(Float64) + @b.as(Float64)
    else
      puts "We can't calculate because '@a or @b has nil."
    end
  end
end

x = Xyz.new
x.a = 3.0_f64
x.b = 2.0_f64
x.do_calc

Or use #try which derived from Object abstract class (Float and Nil deriving it)

class Xyz
  property a, b
  @a : Float64?
  @b : Float64?

  def initialize
    @a = nil
    @b = nil
  end

  def do_calc
    if !@a.nil? && !@b.nil?
      @a.try do |a|
        @b.try do |b|
          puts a + b
        end
      end
    else
      puts "We can't calculate because '@a or @b has nil."
    end
  end
end

x = Xyz.new
x.a = 3.0_f64
x.b = 2.0_f64
x.do_calc

The best practice

It's up to you. And for me it depends on context. I think using #try is much more better because it's more explicit, it explain that a variable may be a nil type. But in this case using #try is very verbose, so I will go for the first solution.

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