I'd like to define a variable inside a .map() iteration, as well as returning a component.

But having this variable inside the map doesn't work (gives me error). Is this possible at all, and if so how do I do this?

Below is a simplified example of what I'm trying to do:

render() {
  return(
    <div>
      {array.map( (element, index) => (
        let disturbingVariable = 100 + index
        <MyComponent disturbingVariable={disturbingVariable} />
      ))}
    </div>
  )
}
  • What is the error message it gives you? – user663031 Sep 8 '16 at 3:29
up vote 1 down vote accepted

When an arrow function has more than one statement you can no longer use the implicit return syntax.

Add block braces and a return statement:

array.map((element, index) => {
  let disturbingVariable = 100 + index
  return <MyComponent disturbingVariable={disturbingVariable} />
})

Alternatively, forgo the variable declaration and perform the addition in-place, maintaining the implicit return:

array.map((element, index) =>
  <MyComponent disturbingVariable={100 + index} />)
  • Right. x => y is identical to function (x) { return y; }. – John Weisz Sep 7 '16 at 15:41

Alternatively, you could omit return and block braces, but the function body should be one liner with implicit return:

render() {
  return(
    <div>
      {array.map((element, index) => <MyComponent disturbingVariable={100 + index}/>)}
    </div>
  )
}

More about implicit return here

Normally i use arrows when either

  • It's a single instruction function
  • I need the this remain referencing to the calling context when the arrow is a callback etc...

However the accepted answer states that

When an arrow function has more than one statement you can no longer use the implicit return syntax.

which is incorrect because we have the comma (,) operator and you can still use implicit return. Yet, if you need variable declarations you can not do it with var, let or const keywords while using the comma operator. However you can still declare a variable within the arrow function's scope as an unused argument. Let's see how you may do your code without using braces and explicit return.

render() {
  return(
    <div>
      {array.map((e, i, _, disturbingVariable) => (
        disturbingVariable = 100 + i, // comma here
        <MyComponent disturbingVariable={disturbingVariable} />
      ))}
    </div>
  )
}

This is because you are trying to implicitly return value from a function instead of explicitly by using a return statement. If you want to return a value as well as do other operations, you will have to do something like this:-

Notice () converts to {} and use of return statement to explicitly return the component.

render() {
  return(
    <div>
      {array.map( (element, index) => {
        let disturbingVariable = 100 + index
        return <MyComponent disturbingVariable={disturbingVariable} />
      })}
    </div>
  )
}
  • "you are trying to implicitly return an object (by using ())" – what ? – user633183 Sep 7 '16 at 16:22
  • Sorry, maybe I didn't phrase it properly. I meant that OP was implicitly returning a value in an arrow function rather than explicitly via a return statement. () => value is same as () => { return value; } – Abhishek Jain Sep 7 '16 at 16:27

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