-2

I am working with a script that pops up an alert if the user is or isn't using IE.

Instead of this, I'd like to show or hide a div element in my page.

I have tried unsuccessfully here: http://fiddle.jshell.net/shhv1Lx3/2/

Working alert demo here: http://fiddle.jshell.net/shhv1Lx3/3/

function GetIEVersion() {
  var sAgent = window.navigator.userAgent;
  var Idx = sAgent.indexOf("MSIE");

  // If IE, return version number.
  if (Idx > 0) 
    return parseInt(sAgent.substring(Idx+ 5, sAgent.indexOf(".", Idx)));

  // If IE 11 then look for Updated user agent string.
  else if (!!navigator.userAgent.match(/Trident\/7\./)) 
    return 11;

  else
    return 0; //It is not IE
}

var e = document.getElementById(ie);
var e2 = document.getElementById(chrome);

if (GetIEVersion() > 0) 
   alert("This is IE " + GetIEVersion());
   e.style.display = 'block';
   e2.style.display = 'none';
else 
   alert("This is not IE.");
   e.style.display = 'none';
   e2.style.display = 'block';
<div id="ie">
ie
</div>

<div id="chrome">
chrome
</div>

5
  • 1
    does the alert work? Sep 7 '16 at 16:32
  • 1
    no brackets in that if statement
    – VLAZ
    Sep 7 '16 at 16:32
  • 2
    You need {} brackets on multiline ifs Sep 7 '16 at 16:39
  • Overall, two (or three) problems that would have been completely avoided using the most basic of looking at the console. It reported (correctly) that the else statement is wrong because it didn't match any ifs, it also complains about e being null and if that error was fixed, it would thrown the same error about e2 as well. We see these sorts of rookie mistakes dozens of times a day here at SO but usually from...well, rookies. I'd have thought that a member of 5 years over 2k rep would 1. have the basic skills to avoid them 2. not run over to SO to ask for debugging help.
    – VLAZ
    Sep 7 '16 at 16:41
  • @TankorSmash Thank you :-) Sep 7 '16 at 16:43
4

You could easily accomplish this (IE vs. not IE) without Javascript using conditional IE comments

<!--[if IE ]>
  <style>
    #chrome { display: none; }
  </style>

  <div id="ie">
    ie
  </div>
<![endif]-->
<div id="chrome">
  chrome
</div>

Note This will only work for IE9 and below - if you are using standards or quirks mode in IE10 or above conditional comments will not work. Read more here

3
  • That's a very clean approach - I like it! Sep 7 '16 at 16:40
  • 2
    Though conditional comments are not supported in IE10 and later.
    – Teemu
    Sep 7 '16 at 16:53
  • @Teemu in standards and quirks mode (which most people would probably opt for - just wanted to clarify a bit). Thanks for the comment though, will update my answer
    – Rob M.
    Sep 7 '16 at 16:56
3

When you have multiple statements in an if or else, you need to wrap them in curly braces.

if (GetIEVersion() > 0) {
   alert("This is IE " + GetIEVersion());
   e.style.display = 'block';
   e2.style.display = 'none';
} else {
   alert("This is not IE.");
   e.style.display = 'none';
   e2.style.display = 'block';
}

Why is it considered a bad practice to omit curly braces?

2
  • 1
    Unbelievable. This is common syntax in most programming languages. Are you normally a Python programmer? It's the only common language that uses indentation instead of brackets.
    – Barmar
    Sep 7 '16 at 16:36
  • @Barmar: Or he could just use used to the syntactic sugar of being able to omit them for single lines inside if/else. Sep 7 '16 at 16:37
3

You should use {} when using if/else statements. The are optional when there is only one statement, but mandatory when there are multiple statements. I highly suggest using {} always, regardless of the number of statements.

You also need to pass a string to getElementById().

function GetIEVersion() {
  var sAgent = window.navigator.userAgent;
  var Idx = sAgent.indexOf("MSIE");

  // If IE, return version number.
  if (Idx > 0){
    return parseInt(sAgent.substring(Idx+ 5, sAgent.indexOf(".", Idx)));
  }
  // If IE 11 then look for Updated user agent string.
  else if (!!navigator.userAgent.match(/Trident\/7\./)){
    return 11;
  }
  else{
    return 0; //It is not IE
  }
}

var e = document.getElementById('ie');
var e2 = document.getElementById('chrome');

if (GetIEVersion() > 0){
   alert("This is IE " + GetIEVersion());
   e.style.display = 'block';
   e2.style.display = 'none';
}
else{
   alert("This is not IE.");
   e.style.display = 'none';
   e2.style.display = 'block';
}
<div id="ie">
ie
</div>

<div id="chrome">
chrome
</div>

5
  • Thanks for your answer. I have made this updates here: fiddle.jshell.net/shhv1Lx3/4 but it still seems to be displaying both divs :( Sep 7 '16 at 16:34
  • Rocket by name, Rocket by nature - what speed! :-D Thank you Sep 7 '16 at 16:35
  • 1
    @michaelmcgurk: Check your getElementById() lines. You need to pass them strings. Sep 7 '16 at 16:35
  • 2
    @michaelmcgurk check the JavaScript console and the reason becomes clear TypeError: e is null.
    – VLAZ
    Sep 7 '16 at 16:36
  • 2
    As the .indexOf() method is not supported in all IE versions, I recommend using the .match() method instead. Sep 7 '16 at 18:43
1

Seems like syntax errors

if (GetIEVersion() > 0)  {
   alert("This is IE " + GetIEVersion());
   e.style.display = 'block';
   e2.style.display = 'none';
   }
else { 
   alert("This is not IE.");
   e.style.display = 'none';
   e2.style.display = 'block';
   }
1

I've had great success with the following code snippet from this Stack Overflow answer to detect Chrome:

I have tested and it works just fine for Internet Explorer.

It avoids the .indexOf() methodology which I prefer. You would simply replace the search parameter in the regex with MSIE

var detectID = (function() {
  var ua = navigator.userAgent,
    tem,
    M = ua.match(/(opera|chrome|safari|firefox|msie|trident(?=\/))\/?\s*(\d+)/i) || [];
  if (/trident/i.test(M[1])) {
    tem = /\brv[ :]+(\d+)/g.exec(ua) || [];
    return 'IE ' + (tem[1] || '');
  }
  if (M[1] === 'Chrome') {
    tem = ua.match(/\b(OPR|Edge)\/(\d+)/);
    if (tem != null) return tem.slice(1).join(' ').replace('OPR', 'Opera');
  }
  M = M[2] ? [M[1], M[2]] : [navigator.appName, navigator.appVersion, '-?'];
  if ((tem = ua.match(/version\/(\d+)/i)) != null) M.splice(1, 1, tem[1]);
  return M.join(' ');
})();

if (detectID.match("IE") || detectID.match("MSIE") ) {
  console.log("IE Browser Detected: " + detectID);
} else {
  console.log("Not IE: " + detectID);
}
1
  • Many thanks, Alexander for taking the time to reply with this detailed response - greatly appreciated :-) Sep 7 '16 at 19:14

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