22

We have an issue where embedded Tomcat is throwing IllegalArgumentException from the LegacyCookieProcessor. It throws a 500 HTTP response code.

We need to handle the exception and do something with it (specifically, send it as a 400 instead).

The typical @ExceptionHandler(IllegalArgumentException.class) doesn't seem to get triggered and Google only seems to give results for dealing with Spring Boot specific exceptions.


Example:

Here is an example to reproduce the behavior. You can execute the example by downloading the initial project including spring-web (https://start.spring.io/) in version 2.1.5.RELEASE. Then add the following two classes to your project.

DemoControllerAdvice.java

package com.example.demo;

import java.util.HashMap;
import java.util.Map;

import org.springframework.http.HttpStatus;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.ExceptionHandler;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.ResponseStatus;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RestControllerAdvice;

@RestControllerAdvice
public class DemoControllerAdvice {

    @ExceptionHandler(IllegalArgumentException.class)
    @ResponseStatus(HttpStatus.FORBIDDEN)
    public Map<String, String> forbiddenHandler() {
        Map<String, String> map = new HashMap<>();
        map.put("error", "An error occurred.");
        map.put("status", HttpStatus.FORBIDDEN.value() + " " + HttpStatus.FORBIDDEN.name());
        return map;
    }

}

DemoRestController.java

package com.example.demo;

import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.GetMapping;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RequestParam;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RestController;

@RestController
public class DemoRestController {

    @GetMapping(value = "/working")
    public void working() {
        throw new java.lang.IllegalArgumentException();
    }

    @GetMapping(value = "/not-working")
    public String notWorking(@RequestParam String demo) {
        return "You need to pass e.g. the character ^ as a request param to test this.";
    }

}

Then, start the server and request the following URLs in the browser:

  • http://localhost:8080/working An IllegalArgumentException is thrown manually in the controller. It is then caught by the ControllerAdvice and will therefore produce a JSON string containing the information defined in the DemoControllerAdvice
  • http://localhost:8080/not-working?demo=test^123 An IllegalArgumentException is thrown by the Tomcat, because the request param cannot be parsed (because of the invalid character ^). The exception however is not caught by the ControllerAdvice. It shows the default HTML page provided by Tomcat. It also provides a different error code than defined in the DemoControllerAdvice.

In the logs the following message is shown:

o.apache.coyote.http11.Http11Processor : Error parsing HTTP request header Note: further occurrences of HTTP request parsing errors will be logged at DEBUG level.

java.lang.IllegalArgumentException: Invalid character found in the request target. The valid characters are defined in RFC 7230 and RFC 3986 at org.apache.coyote.http11.Http11InputBuffer.parseRequestLine(Http11InputBuffer.java:467) ~[tomcat-embed-core-9.0.19.jar:9.0.19]

20
  • 1
    @Imran Strings are not compared like that!
    – Eugene
    May 16, 2019 at 9:02
  • 4
    Maybe you don't find answers because you don't provide a simple MCVE for others to reproduce the problem.
    – kriegaex
    May 17, 2019 at 6:06
  • 5
    You cannot intercept this. This exception is thrown before it is handled by anything Servlet API related, So no servlet filter, listener or DispatcherServlet is even getting involved here. It is just tomcat blowing up internally and very early.
    – M. Deinum
    May 20, 2019 at 10:11
  • 1
    @ssc-hrep3 oddly, I am not able to replicate same behavior on my side for http://localhost:8080/not-working?demo=test^123, its giving me 200. can you please advise which version of Java you are using and also any special properties enabled?. A sample complete github repo helps to try few options.
    – Imran
    May 20, 2019 at 19:33
  • 1
    @ssc-hrep3, see how useful the MCVE is? New people - not necessarily me who asked for the MCVE in the first place because I am an AOP expert but don't know much about containers - enter the discussion and contribute valuable information, reviving a 2.5 years old question. :-)
    – kriegaex
    May 21, 2019 at 2:03

2 Answers 2

7
+25

This is a feature of Tomcat itself as mentioned in this answer.

However, you can do something like this by allowing the special characters that you are expecting as part of your request and handle them yourself.

First, you need to allow the special characters that you would need to handle by setting up the relaxedQueryChars like this.

import org.springframework.boot.web.embedded.tomcat.TomcatServletWebServerFactory;
import org.springframework.boot.web.server.WebServerFactoryCustomizer;
import org.springframework.stereotype.Component;

@Component
public class TomcatCustomizer implements 
WebServerFactoryCustomizer<TomcatServletWebServerFactory> {

@Override
public void customize(TomcatServletWebServerFactory factory) {
    factory.addConnectorCustomizers((connector) -> {
        connector.setAttribute("relaxedQueryChars", "^");
    });
 }
}

and later handle the special characters in each of your requests or create an interceptor and handle it in a common place.

To handle it in the request individually you can do something like this.

import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.GetMapping;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RequestParam;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RestController;

@RestController
public class DemoRestController {

@GetMapping(value = "/working")
public void working() {
    throw new java.lang.IllegalArgumentException();
}

@GetMapping(value = "/not-working")
public String notWorking(@RequestParam String demo) {

    if (demo.contains("^")) {
        throw new java.lang.IllegalArgumentException("^");
    }
    return "You need to pass e.g. the character ^ as a request param to test this.";
}

}

You might also want to refer this answer to decide if you really need this fix.

3
  • 1
    Thanks for your response, this is interesting. However, I don't want to allow those characters. I just want to respond to all exceptions in the same way: By returning an HTTP package with JSON in it (and custom headers). Allowing those characters and then handling them in each controller again doesn't seem to be a good solution. And it doesn't actually prevent Tomcat to throw other exceptions (I assume there are other scenarios, Tomcat would throw an exception apart of special characters).
    – ssc-hrep3
    May 21, 2019 at 9:11
  • Allowing those characters in each controller is just an example for this scenario. What you could do is build a HTTP interceptor and check for the parameter with special character and throw the IllegalArgumentException from the interceptor to have a common implementation. May 21, 2019 at 9:37
  • 3
    While the question has evolved to talking about query params, the original question was actually about a weird value in the cookies, not the query params. Does this work for both scenarios?
    – samanime
    May 21, 2019 at 14:16
0

You may not interested in the solution any more.Just in case others do: try to catch IllegalArgumentException in your filter, then call HttpServletResponse.sendError(int sc, String msg); This may catch the IllegalArgumentExceptions that do not come from tomcat though. But suppose you already handle them properly.

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