314

Well, this one seems quite simple, and it is. All you have to do to download a file to your server is:

file_put_contents("Tmpfile.zip", file_get_contents("http://someurl/file.zip"));

Only there is one problem. What if you have a large file, like 100mb. Then, you will run out of memory, and not be able to download the file.

What I want is a way to write the file to the disk as I am downloading it. That way, I can download bigger files, without running into memory problems.

  • 3
    That's set in your server configuration, PHP can't really get around it as far as I know (except for a direct .ini edit) – Ben Oct 15 '10 at 0:12
  • 83
    No reason to come across as rude. – alex Nov 2 '10 at 23:23

10 Answers 10

459

Since PHP 5.1.0, file_put_contents() supports writing piece-by-piece by passing a stream-handle as the $data parameter:

file_put_contents("Tmpfile.zip", fopen("http://someurl/file.zip", 'r'));

From the manual:

If data [that is the second argument] is a stream resource, the remaining buffer of that stream will be copied to the specified file. This is similar with using stream_copy_to_stream().

(Thanks Hakre.)

  • 4
    That wouldn't be my first choice. If allow_fopen_url Off is set in php.ini (good idea for security), your script would be broken. – PleaseStand Oct 15 '10 at 0:43
  • 4
    @idealmachine I think file_get_contents() would not work either if that were the case (see OP). – alex Oct 15 '10 at 0:45
  • 10
    @geoff I was specific, I mentioned the function you wanted. What you may have wanted was someone to write the code for you - but I'm sure you learned something doing it yourself. Also, if we are going to comment on each other's SO interactions - please accept some more answers :) – alex Oct 15 '10 at 1:37
  • @alex: Please see the edit, feel free to incorporate. let me know when I can remove this comment here then. – hakre Mar 31 '13 at 14:20
  • 4
    The 'b' flag should also be used in most cases with fopen; prevents adverse effects to images and other non plain text files. – Wayne Weibel Sep 12 '13 at 18:48
129
private function downloadFile($url, $path)
{
    $newfname = $path;
    $file = fopen ($url, 'rb');
    if ($file) {
        $newf = fopen ($newfname, 'wb');
        if ($newf) {
            while(!feof($file)) {
                fwrite($newf, fread($file, 1024 * 8), 1024 * 8);
            }
        }
    }
    if ($file) {
        fclose($file);
    }
    if ($newf) {
        fclose($newf);
    }
}
  • 2
    Thanks, very useful ! – Aweb Nov 21 '11 at 9:40
  • 2
    This is the way to go! – vdbuilder Dec 2 '11 at 19:16
  • 2
    Specifically, it means to read up to 8KB at a time (1024 bytes per KB * 8) since the parameter is in bytes. As long as the line is <= 8KB, it will read the entire line at once. – Doktor J Sep 27 '12 at 13:49
  • 1
    Why is not this the best answer? – GunJack Dec 17 '13 at 18:30
  • 1
    How do you handle errors with this approach? What if a 404 is returned or the connection is interrupted or times out? – Adam Swinden Dec 29 '14 at 11:33
63

Try using cURL

set_time_limit(0); // unlimited max execution time
$options = array(
  CURLOPT_FILE    => '/path/to/download/the/file/to.zip',
  CURLOPT_TIMEOUT =>  28800, // set this to 8 hours so we dont timeout on big files
  CURLOPT_URL     => 'http://remoteserver.com/path/to/big/file.zip',
);

$ch = curl_init();
curl_setopt_array($ch, $options);
curl_exec($ch);
curl_close($ch);

I'm not sure but I believe with the CURLOPT_FILE option it writes as it pulls the data, ie. not buffered.

  • 2
    Normally, this would be fine, but I have this code in a web app, so I cant be sure users will have cURL installed. However, I did give this a vote up. – xaav Oct 15 '10 at 0:29
  • @Geoff is it a distributed web app? Because if you control the hosting, then it doesn't matter about your users (cURL is a library on your server). – alex Oct 15 '10 at 0:47
  • No. I do not control hosting. It is a distributed web app that anyone could have. – xaav Oct 15 '10 at 1:26
  • 3
    Curl might be missing. But almost all shared hosting companies have CURL installed by default. I mean, I haven't seen one that doesn't. – Mangirdas Skripka Jul 14 '12 at 17:12
  • 16
    As from my tests, you can't assign to CURLOPT_FILE a file path directly. It has to be a file handler. First, open the file with $fh = fopen('/path/to/download/the/file/to.zip', 'w'); and close with fclose($fh); after curl_close($ch);. And set CURLOPT_FILE => $fh – Gustavo May 7 '16 at 1:06
20

Above there is examle (cited by prodigitalson) of code wchih not work (reason: missing fopen in CURLOPT_FILE - http://www.webdeveloper.com/forum/showthread.php?268299-RESOLVED-PHP-script-for-a-cronjob-download-file-unpzck-run-another-php-script ). I cant add comment there becose I have too low number of points so Below I give working example (it also work for "local url"):

function downloadUrlToFile($url, $outFileName)
{   
    if(is_file($url)) {
        copy($url, $outFileName); 
    } else {
        $options = array(
          CURLOPT_FILE    => fopen($outFileName, 'w'),
          CURLOPT_TIMEOUT =>  28800, // set this to 8 hours so we dont timeout on big files
          CURLOPT_URL     => $url
        );

        $ch = curl_init();
        curl_setopt_array($ch, $options);
        curl_exec($ch);
        curl_close($ch);
    }
}
19
  1. Create a folder called "downloads" in destination server
  2. Save [this code] into .php file and run in destination server

Downloader :

<html>
<form method="post">
<input name="url" size="50" />
<input name="submit" type="submit" />
</form>
<?php
    // maximum execution time in seconds
    set_time_limit (24 * 60 * 60);

    if (!isset($_POST['submit'])) die();

    // folder to save downloaded files to. must end with slash
    $destination_folder = 'downloads/';

    $url = $_POST['url'];
    $newfname = $destination_folder . basename($url);

    $file = fopen ($url, "rb");
    if ($file) {
      $newf = fopen ($newfname, "wb");

      if ($newf)
      while(!feof($file)) {
        fwrite($newf, fread($file, 1024 * 8 ), 1024 * 8 );
      }
    }

    if ($file) {
      fclose($file);
    }

    if ($newf) {
      fclose($newf);
    }
?>
</html> 
  • This assumes the user wants a standalone script rather than a solution that will work within an existing PHP application, and I believe the latter is what the OP and most others are looking for. An explanation would also be helpful for people who want to understand the approach. – Sean the Bean May 20 '16 at 20:27
  • whenever I try this always my transferred file size is 50816 but my file size is bigger than this.. 120MB.. Any idea why is this? – Riffaz Starr May 6 '17 at 16:49
  • set_time_limit (24 * 60 * 60); has to be put inside a loop. It has no effect at the beginning of the script. – Viktor Joras Apr 23 '18 at 15:17
16
set_time_limit(0); 
$file = file_get_contents('path of your file');
file_put_contents('file.ext', $file);
  • your answer is very simple and good working, helped me where cURL failed to get file, this worked. Thanks :) – Tommix Feb 24 '14 at 8:39
  • 2
    You might want to explain what this actually does. – alex Dec 14 '15 at 9:05
  • 6
    This does not address the OP's problem of exceeding the PHP memory limit. – user9645 Jul 19 '16 at 19:50
  • This is pretty simple and straightforward. Quite useful for simpler cases where the files are small or the the environment is a local development. – bob-12345 May 16 at 13:28
8

There are 3 ways:

  1. file_get_contents and file_put_contents
  2. CURL
  3. fopen

You can find examples from here.

7

Use a simple method in php copy()

copy($source_url, $local_path_with_file_name);

Note: if the destination file already exists, it will be overwritten

PHP copy() Function

Note: You need to set permission 777 for the destination folder. Use this method when you are downloading to your local machine.

Special Note: 777 is a permission in Unix based system with full read/write/execute permission to owner, group and everyone. In general we give this permission to assets which are not much needed to be hidden from public on a web server. Example: images folder.

  • I will never never never set 777 as perms on a webserver, and I will kick off any webdeveloper whom has the bad idea to do that. Every time, everywhere. Be carefull ! You can not do that ! Think about security. Following OWASP rules is not enough. Having good thinking about simple things matters. – ThierryB Jul 12 at 0:09
  • @ThierryB. Note: I've given local path. & this can be used in internal applications. Having good reading and understanding of question and answer matters. Think different scenarios. And this is not accepted/best answer. Every question has different answers with pros & cons in it.. Example for you to understand: Even Fibonacci have multiple unique solutions where only one will be best. Others will be used in different scenarios. – Pradeep Kumar Prabaharan Jul 13 at 2:08
  • Ok, but taking time to think about best practises and implement them inside secured places will give you a better understanding of concepts you must implement. Maybe if an intruder is inside your ($)home, doing some traps or building things the best way you can will give him some headaches ;) – ThierryB Jul 16 at 18:12
5

I use this to download file

function cURLcheckBasicFunctions()
{
  if( !function_exists("curl_init") &&
      !function_exists("curl_setopt") &&
      !function_exists("curl_exec") &&
      !function_exists("curl_close") ) return false;
  else return true;
}

/*
 * Returns string status information.
 * Can be changed to int or bool return types.
 */
function cURLdownload($url, $file)
{
  if( !cURLcheckBasicFunctions() ) return "UNAVAILABLE: cURL Basic Functions";
  $ch = curl_init();
  if($ch)
  {

    $fp = fopen($file, "w");
    if($fp)
    {
      if( !curl_setopt($ch, CURLOPT_URL, $url) )
      {
        fclose($fp); // to match fopen()
        curl_close($ch); // to match curl_init()
        return "FAIL: curl_setopt(CURLOPT_URL)";
      }
      if ((!ini_get('open_basedir') && !ini_get('safe_mode')) || $redirects < 1) {
        curl_setopt($ch, CURLOPT_USERAGENT, '"Mozilla/5.0 (X11; U; Linux i686; en-US; rv:1.8.1.11) Gecko/20071204 Ubuntu/7.10 (gutsy) Firefox/2.0.0.11');
        curl_setopt($ch, CURLOPT_RETURNTRANSFER, 1);
        //curl_setopt($ch, CURLOPT_REFERER, 'http://domain.com/');
        if( !curl_setopt($ch, CURLOPT_HEADER, $curlopt_header)) return "FAIL: curl_setopt(CURLOPT_HEADER)";
        if( !curl_setopt($ch, CURLOPT_FOLLOWLOCATION, $redirects > 0)) return "FAIL: curl_setopt(CURLOPT_FOLLOWLOCATION)";
        if( !curl_setopt($ch, CURLOPT_FILE, $fp) ) return "FAIL: curl_setopt(CURLOPT_FILE)";
        if( !curl_setopt($ch, CURLOPT_MAXREDIRS, $redirects) ) return "FAIL: curl_setopt(CURLOPT_MAXREDIRS)";

        return curl_exec($ch);
    } else {
        curl_setopt($ch, CURLOPT_USERAGENT, '"Mozilla/5.0 (X11; U; Linux i686; en-US; rv:1.8.1.11) Gecko/20071204 Ubuntu/7.10 (gutsy) Firefox/2.0.0.11');
        curl_setopt($ch, CURLOPT_RETURNTRANSFER, 1);
        //curl_setopt($ch, CURLOPT_REFERER, 'http://domain.com/');
        if( !curl_setopt($ch, CURLOPT_FOLLOWLOCATION, false)) return "FAIL: curl_setopt(CURLOPT_FOLLOWLOCATION)";
        if( !curl_setopt($ch, CURLOPT_FILE, $fp) ) return "FAIL: curl_setopt(CURLOPT_FILE)";
        if( !curl_setopt($ch, CURLOPT_HEADER, true)) return "FAIL: curl_setopt(CURLOPT_HEADER)";
        if( !curl_setopt($ch, CURLOPT_RETURNTRANSFER, true)) return "FAIL: curl_setopt(CURLOPT_RETURNTRANSFER)";
        if( !curl_setopt($ch, CURLOPT_FORBID_REUSE, false)) return "FAIL: curl_setopt(CURLOPT_FORBID_REUSE)";
        curl_setopt($ch, CURLOPT_USERAGENT, '"Mozilla/5.0 (X11; U; Linux i686; en-US; rv:1.8.1.11) Gecko/20071204 Ubuntu/7.10 (gutsy) Firefox/2.0.0.11');
    }
      // if( !curl_setopt($ch, CURLOPT_FOLLOWLOCATION, true) ) return "FAIL: curl_setopt(CURLOPT_FOLLOWLOCATION)";
      // if( !curl_setopt($ch, CURLOPT_FILE, $fp) ) return "FAIL: curl_setopt(CURLOPT_FILE)";
      // if( !curl_setopt($ch, CURLOPT_HEADER, 0) ) return "FAIL: curl_setopt(CURLOPT_HEADER)";
      if( !curl_exec($ch) ) return "FAIL: curl_exec()";
      curl_close($ch);
      fclose($fp);
      return "SUCCESS: $file [$url]";
    }
    else return "FAIL: fopen()";
  }
  else return "FAIL: curl_init()";
}
4

A PHP 4 & 5 Solution:

readfile() will not present any memory issues, even when sending large files, on its own. A URL can be used as a filename with this function if the fopen wrappers have been enabled.

http://php.net/manual/en/function.readfile.php

  • 1
    This does not answer the question, because the question is about writing on disk not to the output buffer. – Lorenz Meyer Nov 23 '17 at 17:18

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