That's the data which I would like to plot:

structure(list(`10` = c(0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0), 
               `34` = c(0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 547725, 0), 
               `59` = c(0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0), 
               `84` = c(0, 0, 0, 8173070.8, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0), 
               `110` = c(0, 0, 0, 20302893.6, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0), 
               `134` = c(0, 0, 0, 13696077.5, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0), 
               `165` = c(1024325, 0, 0, 10486165.5, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0), 
               `199` = c(1183267.5, 0, 0, 6015700, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0), 
               `234` = c(1771708.3, 0, 0, 3384495.8, 3384495.8, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1144700), 
               `257` = c(2007712.3, 0, 0, 0, 6980230.6, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0), 
               `362` = c(3339118.9, 0, 0, 0, 7280030.6, 1119625, 0, 0, 0, 0), 
               `433` = c(973797.9, 0, 0, 0, 6230170, 1497625, 0, 0, 0, 0), 
               `506` = c(0, 0, 0, 0, 12905925, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0), 
               `581` = c(0, 2140050, 0, 0, 4560645.8, 0, 3170133.3, 0, 0, 0), 
               `652` = c(0, 639437.7, 639437.7, 0, 2349711.3, 0, 902318.3, 902318.3, 0, 0), 
               `733` = c(0, 0, 1397257.5, 0, 2274710, 0, 0, 1414458.3, 0, 0), 
               `818` = c(0, 0, 742731.8, 0, 2953550, 0, 0, 563876.7, 0, 0), 
               `896` = c(0, 0, 714654.7, 0, 1199563.3, 0, 0, 561000, 0, 0), 
               `972` = c(0, 0, 434271.5, 0, 1358225, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0), 
               `1039` = c(0, 0, 227435, 0, 934840, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0)), 
               .Names = c("10", "34", "59", "84", "110", "134", "165", "199", "234", "257", "362", "433", "506", "581", "652", "733", "818", "896", "972", "1039"), 
               row.names = c("Mark121_1", "Mark121_2", "Mark121_3", "Mark143_1", "Mark143_2", "Mark152_1", "Mark152_2", "Mark152_3", "Mark444_1", "Mark444_2"), 
               class = "data.frame")

I would like to put the lines for the rows which differ only in the number after _ (dash) on the same plot. The different colors for the lines are necessary. I was thinking about using matplot but I have no idea how to select the rows with similar strings.

Using simple words I would like to have lines for:

  1. Mark121_*
  2. Mark143_*
  3. Mark152_*
  4. Mark444_*

on the same graph. It means 4 different graphs containing multiple lines.

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This solution uses "dplyr" and "ggplot2" and "purrr". There is a large difference in scale so I change to log10, you might not want that.

df2 <- df %>% mutate(Name= rownames(.)) %>%
  gather(key=period, value=value,-Name) %>%
  mutate(person= sub("_.", "", Name), period=as.numeric(period))


df2 %>% ggplot(., aes(x=period, y=log10(value), colour=Name, group=Name)) +
  geom_line() + facet_wrap(~person)

Edit: Additional request

In order to plot each figure individually

#This saves the figures as a list of plot objects
FiguresList <- unique(df2$person) %>% map(function(P) {
   df2 %>% filter(person ==P) %>% 
    ggplot(., aes(x=period, y=log10(value), colour=Name, group=Name)) +
      geom_line()}
  )
FiguresList[[1]]

#This saves each plot as a pdf named by the person e.g "Mark121.pdf"
unique(df2$person) %>% map(function(P) {
   df2 %>% filter(person ==P) %>% 
    ggplot(., aes(x=period, y=log10(value), colour=Name, group=Name)) +
      geom_line()
    ggsave(paste(P,".pdf", sep=""))}
  )
  • It works as it supposed to. I have an additional question if possible. How can I do to have every new graph on separate pdf page ? My real data is thousands of rows... Thx – Shaxi Liver Sep 8 '16 at 12:44
  • 1
    I've put in some code, but if you have thousands of lines to plot on each figure, it might be better to use a heatmap (by using geom_raster) otherwise it could look confusing. – Jonno Bourne Sep 8 '16 at 13:03
  • It will be no more than 4 lines at the same graph. The problem is only with number of graphs which will be generated. – Shaxi Liver Sep 8 '16 at 13:19
  • From which package function map comes from ? – Shaxi Liver Sep 8 '16 at 13:26
  • 2
    woops I forgot to put in the "purrr" package. Plotting thousands of similar looking plots is difficult for the reader to get information from them, even if they are in the appendix, perhaps you can create a summary statistic and plot the density of that – Jonno Bourne Sep 8 '16 at 13:46

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