30

I have the following code, in Django:

class Parent(models.Model):
    def save(self):
        # Do Stuff A

class Mixin(object):
    def save(self):
        # Do Stuff B

class A(Parent, Mixin):
    def save(self):
        super(A, self).save()
        # Do stuff C

Now, I want to use the mixin without blatting the behaviour of the save in Parent. So I when I save, I want to do stuff C, B, and A. I've read Calling the setter of a super class in a mixin however I don't get it and having read the super docs it doesn't seem to answer my question.

THe question is, what do I put in the mixin to make sure it does stuff B and doesn't stop Stuff A from happening?

7
  • Are you sure that inheritance order is right - you'd normally put a mixin after the parent... Sep 8, 2016 at 16:06
  • I'm not sure, no. My understanding is that if I did it the other way round, the mixin's save method would be overridden by Parent. Is that correct? Sep 8, 2016 at 16:08
  • 1
    No - the MRO is (for non diamond inheritance) - right to left... Sep 8, 2016 at 16:09
  • 2
    Just ignore me - can I put it down to lack of coffee? :p Sep 8, 2016 at 16:24
  • 1
    Is this different in newer Django versions? The Mixins should be listed before the parent in an in heritance setting, e.g. here
    – nerdoc
    Dec 23, 2021 at 17:05

4 Answers 4

29

How about calling super in your mixin class?

class Parent(object):
    def test(self):
        print("parent")


class MyMixin(object):
    def test(self):
        super(MyMixin, self).test()
        print("mixin")


class MyClass(MyMixin, Parent):
    def test(self):
        super(MyClass, self).test()
        print("self")

if __name__ == "__main__":
    my_obj = MyClass()
    my_obj.test()

This will give you the output as:

$ python test.py
parent
mixin
self
3
  • 14
    What's very annoying with this is that most IDEs will highlight MyMixin's super(...).test() call, because there's technically no parent class on MixMixin to call test() on.
    – jlh
    Jul 19, 2017 at 18:34
  • @jlh I totally get it, such an eyesore not to have that green check mark on the code inspector. Sep 19, 2017 at 18:55
  • Could you pls explain what the super() method refers to in a class without parent ? Mar 11, 2022 at 15:58
14

The best practice for calling the implementation from the superclass is to use super():

class Mixin(object):
    def save(self):
        super(Mixin, self).save()
        # Do Stuff B here or before super call, as you wish

What is important is that you call super() in each class (so that it propagates all the way) but not the topmost (base) class, because its superclass does not have save().

Note that when you call super(Mixin, self).save(), you don't really know what the super class would be once it is executed. That will be defined later.

Unlike some other languages, in python, the end class will always have a linear list of classes from which it inherits. That is called MRO (Method Resolution Order). From MRO Python decides what to do on super() call. You can see what the MRO is for your class this way:

>>> A.__mro__
(<class '__main__.A'>, <class '__main__.Parent'>, <class '__main__.Model'>, <class '__main__.Mixin'>, <type 'object'>)

So, A's super is Parent, Parent's super is Model, Model's super is Mixin and Mixin's super is object.

That is wrong, so you should change A's parents to:

class A(Mixin, Parent):

Then you'd have a better MRO:

>>> A.__mro__
(<class '__main__.A'>, <class '__main__.Mixin'>, <class '__main__.Parent'>, <class '__main__.Model'>, <type 'object'>)
8

@Click2Death answer is correct, however, when you call super().test() inside your mixin class most IDE will claim that test is unresolved, which is correct.

enter image description here

Here is how to make your IDE happy and your code better.

class Parent(object):
    def test(self):
        print("parent")


class MyMixin(object):
    def test(self):
        super_test = getattr(super(), 'test')
        if super_test and callable(super_test):
            super_test()
        print("mixin")


class MyClass(MyMixin, Parent):
    def test(self):
        super().test()
        print("self")

if __name__ == "__main__":
    my_obj = MyClass()
    my_obj.test()

This is Python 3 code, to make it working with Python 2 you need to pass two arguments to the super(MyClass, self) call

4

Django Example (Python 3+)

To expand on Vladimir Prudnikov's answer in a Django context, the template view mixin class could be structured as shown below.

from django.views.generic.base import View


class MyViewMixin:

    def dispatch(self, request, *args, **kwargs):
        super_dispatch = getattr(super(), 'dispatch')
        if super_dispatch and callable(super_dispatch):
            return super_dispatch(request, *args, **kwargs)
        raise RuntimeError('MyViewMixin must be used as part of a '
            'multiple inheritance chain that includes a Django template-view')


class MyCustomView(MyViewMixin, View):

    def dispatch(self, *args, **kwargs):
        return super().dispatch(*args, **kwargs)

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