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My goal is to create an immutable function (functional programming) using "accumulate" in C++. I created a dummy list that generates 1's based on the position I send, which will be 6. So the list at the start contains {1,1,1,1,1,1}. I tried using accumulate to somehow use the information on this list and make the fibonacci sequence into a new list. The result has to be {1,1,2,3,5,8}

Here is what I have.

list<int> immutableFibonacci(int position)
{
const size_t fixedListSize(position);
list<int> newList(position, int(1));
list<int> copyList;
list<int>::iterator it = newList.begin();

if (position <=2)
{
    return newList; //returns {1,1} or {1}
}

while (position>0)
{
    advance(it, 1);
    sum = accumulate(newList.begin(),it, 0); 
    copyList.push_back(sum);
    position--;
}
    return copyList;
}

What I have so far will return copyList as {1,2,3,4,5,6}. Can someone please push me in the right direction on what to do? I tried researching quite a bit.

8
  • 1
    FYI usually you want vector rather than list if you just want a container. – jaggedSpire Sep 8 '16 at 17:51
  • 2
    Data can be immutable, functions can’t. Furthermore, std::accumulate seems like a badly fitting algorithm here. – Konrad Rudolph Sep 8 '16 at 17:51
  • In my function I am being required to use accumulate – coding_xeno Sep 8 '16 at 17:55
  • std::accumulate seems overkill to do Fib[n] = Fib[n - 2] + Fib[n - 1]. – Jarod42 Sep 8 '16 at 17:55
  • 1
    std::generate seems like a much better algorithm to generate the sequence. – NathanOliver Sep 8 '16 at 17:56
-1

How about this:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <numeric>
#include <string>
#include <functional>

int main()
{
    std::vector<int> v{1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1};

    std::vector<int> s = std::accumulate(v.begin(), v.end(),std::vector<int>{},
                                        [](const std::vector<int>& a, int b) 
                    {
                        std::vector<int> d = a;
                        if(a.size()<2)
                        {
                            d.push_back(1);
                        }
                        else
                        {
                            auto start = d.rbegin();
                            auto first = *start;
                            start++;
                            auto second = *start;
                            d.push_back(first+second);
                        }
                        return d;
                    });

    std::cout << "Fibo: " <<'\n';

    for( auto c : s )
    {
        std::cout << c << "-";
    }
    std::cout << '\n';
}

But I also think it is a bit too much overhead, for something that simple.

EDIT: Remember to compile that with: g++ --std=c++14 fibo.cpp -o fibo.

EDIT: If you don't want to use the lambda function look here: How can I modify this Fibonacci code in C++ to use a function instead of lambda?

4
  • 1
    It worked liked magic! will you be kind enough to explain what is going on so I can understand this better? Is this honoring immutability? – coding_xeno Sep 8 '16 at 18:38
  • Congratulations. You just added another Cargo Cult Programmer to the world. – user4581301 Sep 8 '16 at 21:11
  • @coding_xeno: Because v can be const you get a new vector s with your result. I'm guess you mean variables that with immutability; v does not get altered in the process. About std::accumulate: First and second parameter are clear. The third one is an empty vector. You have to provide it for the template deduction. The fourth one is a lambda function that by giving the vector a and a value b that is every deref'd v iterator. a is the d vector of the last call and get "accumulated" in the process. – Gerhard Stein Sep 9 '16 at 4:25
  • @user4581301: Really? Then tell me what I should have done? Not help him or what? – Gerhard Stein Sep 9 '16 at 4:37
1

this method creates a 'container-like' object which exposes iterators via begin() and end()

#include <iterator>
#include <iostream>

struct fib_iterator : std::iterator<std::forward_iterator_tag, long long>
{
    fib_iterator(std::size_t torun = 0) : to_run(torun) {}
    value_type operator*() const {
        return value();
    }
    fib_iterator& operator++()
    {
        --to_run;
        switch(preamble)
        {
            case 2:
                --preamble;
                return *this;
            case 1:
                --preamble;
                return *this;
        }

        auto next = value();
        x = y;
        y = next;
        return *this;
    }

    value_type value() const
    {
        switch(preamble)
        {
            case 2:
                return 0;
            case 1:
                return 1;
        }
        return x + y;
    }

    bool operator==(const fib_iterator& r) const {
        return to_run == r.to_run;
    }

    bool operator!=(const fib_iterator& r) const {
        return to_run != r.to_run;
    }

    long long x = 0;
    long long y = 1;
    std::size_t preamble = 2;
    std::size_t to_run;
};

struct fibonacci_sequence
{
    fibonacci_sequence(std::size_t length) : length_(length) {}

    fib_iterator begin() const { return { length_ }; }
    fib_iterator end() const { return { }; }

    std::size_t length_;
};

int main()
{
    for (auto i : fibonacci_sequence(50))
        std::cout << i << ", ";
    std::cout << '\n';
}

sample output:

0, 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, 55, 89, 144, 233, 377, 610, 987, 
1597, 2584, 4181, 6765, 10946, 17711, 28657, 46368, 75025, 121393,
196418, 317811, 514229, 832040, 1346269, 2178309, 3524578, 5702887,
9227465, 14930352, 24157817, 39088169, 63245986, 102334155, 165580141,
267914296, 433494437, 701408733, 1134903170, 1836311903, 2971215073,
4807526976, 7778742049, 

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