How can I do the following in Python?

array = [0, 10, 20, 40]
for (i = array.length() - 1; i >= 0; i--)

I need to have the elements of an array, but from the end to the beginning.

30 Answers 30

up vote 996 down vote accepted

You can make use of the reversed function for this as:

>>> array=[0,10,20,40]
>>> for i in reversed(array):
...     print(i)

Note that reversed(...) does not return a list. You can get a reversed list using list(reversed(array)).

  • 126
    can't you just use: array[::-1] ? – kdlannoy Apr 24 '16 at 9:58
  • 76
    @kdlannoy According to the page linked to in the answer, "Compared to extended slicing, such as range(1,4)[::-1], reversed() is easier to read, runs faster, and uses substantially less memory. " – Jim Oldfield Aug 20 '16 at 15:55
  • 1
    When I tested this slicing was about twice as fast (when reversing a 10k elements list and creating a list from it). I did not test memory consumption though. reverse might be faster though, if you don't need to cast to list afterwards. – Dakkaron Aug 23 '16 at 14:01
  • 2
    worth noting that this is not the same as reverse([1,2,3]), n.b. the 'd' at the end ... which is one of the other answers below, which does this in-place, whereas this returns an iterator. – Luciano Oct 8 '16 at 9:36
  • 6
    Why use reversed() instead of slicing? Read the Zen of Python, rule number 7: Readability counts! – kramer65 Apr 25 '17 at 8:26
>>> L = [0,10,20,40]
>>> L[::-1]
[40, 20, 10, 0]

Extended slice syntax is explained well in the Python What's new Entry for release 2.3.5

By special request in a comment this is the most current slice documentation.

  • 7
    It works for any interable, not just lists. Disadvantage is that it's not in place. – Swiss Oct 15 '10 at 7:04
  • 3
    @Tim it returns a slice, so doesn't change the actual list contents – fortran Oct 15 '10 at 7:04
  • 49
    the reversed() container is more clear. – lunixbochs Oct 15 '10 at 7:05
  • 10
    @lunixbochs reversed returns an iterator and not a list in Python 3. – Swiss Oct 15 '10 at 7:09
  • 5
    @Swiss right, but the OP's example was an iteration :) – lunixbochs Oct 15 '10 at 7:16
>>> L = [0,10,20,40]
>>> L.reverse()
>>> L
[40, 20, 10, 0]

Or

>>> L[::-1]
[40, 20, 10, 0]
  • 6
    the second works like magic, could you explain the syntax? – mko Aug 8 '12 at 7:47
  • 53
    [start:stop:step] so step is -1 – papalagi Sep 26 '12 at 3:36
  • 29
    Detail: The first modifies the list in-place, the second one just returns a new reversed list, but it doesn't modify the original one. – franzlorenzon Oct 29 '13 at 14:02
  • 16
    +1 for using List.reverse() – rickcnagy Jun 19 '14 at 21:31
  • 6
    the second example should be L=L[::-1] to actually reverse the list otherwise you're only returning the values in reverse – mogga Sep 30 '14 at 1:53

This is to duplicate the list:

L = [0,10,20,40]
p = L[::-1]  #  Here p will be having reversed list

This is to reverse the list in-place:

L.reverse() # Here L will be reversed in-place (no new list made)

I think that the best way to reverse a list in Python is to do:

a = [1,2,3,4]
a = a[::-1]
print(a)
>>> [4,3,2,1]

The job is done, and now you have a reversed list.

  • 1
    But not generally accepted as the answer in an interview context where the interviewer is expecting a more algorithmic approach. But, of course, be sure to mention that you know of the other Pythonic methods – SimonM May 31 at 2:25

For reversing the same list use:

array.reverse()

To assign reversed list into some other list use:

newArray = array[::-1] 
  • 1
    ...or array = array.reverse() to do in place – SimonM Jun 3 at 11:00

Using slicing, e.g. array = array[::-1], is a neat trick and very Pythonic, but a little obscure for newbies maybe. Using the reverse() method is a good way to go in day to day coding because it is easily readable.

However, if you need to reverse a list in place as in an interview question, you will likely not be able to use built in methods like these. The interviewer will be looking at how you approach the problem rather than the depth of Python knowledge, an algorithmic approach is required. The following example, using a classic swap, might be one way to do it:-

def reverse_in_place(lst):      # Declare a function
    size = len(lst)             # Get the length of the sequence
    hiindex = size - 1
    its = size/2                # Number of iterations required
    for i in xrange(0, its):    # i is the low index pointer
        temp = lst[hiindex]     # Perform a classic swap
        lst[hiindex] = lst[i]
        lst[i] = temp
        hiindex -= 1            # Decrement the high index pointer
    print "Done!"

# Now test it!!
array = [2, 5, 8, 9, 12, 19, 25, 27, 32, 60, 65, 1, 7, 24, 124, 654]

print array                    # Print the original sequence
reverse_in_place(array)        # Call the function passing the list
print array                    # Print reversed list


**The result:**
[2, 5, 8, 9, 12, 19, 25, 27, 32, 60, 65, 1, 7, 24, 124, 654]
Done!
[654, 124, 24, 7, 1, 65, 60, 32, 27, 25, 19, 12, 9, 8, 5, 2]

Note that this will not work on Tuples or string sequences, because strings and tuples are immutable, i.e., you cannot write into them to change elements.

  • 5
    The classic swap could be done via lst[hiindex], lst[i] = lst[i], lst[hiindex], I think... ;-) – Samoth Mar 25 '17 at 10:50
  • @Samoth That syntax isn't as clear and the behavior isn't exactly obvious. Distinct steps make more sense. – Anthony Jul 7 at 18:29
  • why people say that things like array[::-1] are pythonic? The python zen teach us that explicit is better than implicit and readability counts. Stuff like that are not explicit and readable at all. – k4ppa Aug 20 at 15:36
for x in array[::-1]:
    do stuff
  • This slicing method is not very readable. The Pythonic way would be to use the reverse() method. ;-) – SimonM May 31 at 12:21
  • @SimonM reverse() is definitely easier to understand at a glance. – Swiss Jun 1 at 22:22

I find (contrary to some other suggestions) that l.reverse() is by far the fastest way to reverse a long list in Python 3 and 2. I'd be interested to know if others can replicate these timings.

l[::-1] is probably slower because it copies the list prior to reversing it. Adding the list() call around the iterator made by reversed(l) must add some overhead. Of course if you want a copy of the list or an iterator then use those respective methods, but if you want to just reverse the list then l.reverse() seems to be the fastest way.

Functions

def rev_list1(l):
    return l[::-1]

def rev_list2(l):
    return list(reversed(l))

def rev_list3(l):
    l.reverse()
    return l

List

l = list(range(1000000))

Python 3.5 timings

timeit(lambda: rev_list1(l), number=1000)
# 6.48
timeit(lambda: rev_list2(l), number=1000)
# 7.13
timeit(lambda: rev_list3(l), number=1000)
# 0.44

Python 2.7 timings

timeit(lambda: rev_list1(l), number=1000)
# 6.76
timeit(lambda: rev_list2(l), number=1000)
# 9.18
timeit(lambda: rev_list3(l), number=1000)
# 0.46
  • 2
    list.reverse is the fastest, because it reverses in place – warvariuc Sep 17 '17 at 18:38

With reversed and list:

>>> list1 = [1,2,3]
>>> reversed_list = list(reversed(list1))
>>> reversed_list
>>> [3, 2, 1]

Possible ways,

list1 = [3,4,3,545,6,4,34,243]

list1.reverse()

list1[::-1]
array=[0,10,20,40]
for e in reversed(array):
  print e

Using reversed(array) would be the likely best route.

>>> array = [1,2,3,4]
>>> for item in reversed(array):
>>>     print item

Should you need to understand how could implement this without using the built in reversed.

def reverse(a):
    midpoint = len(a)/2
    for item in a[:midpoint]:
        otherside = (len(a) - a.index(item)) - 1
        temp = a[otherside]
        a[otherside] = a[a.index(item)]
        a[a.index(item)] = temp
    return a

This should take O(N) time.

  • Was looking for how to do that without using the reverse function. Thanks. – Bernard Parah Jun 18 '16 at 20:50
  • Or to reverse in place use list = list.reverse() – SimonM May 31 at 12:23

If you want to store the elements of reversed list in some other variable, then you can use revArray = array[::-1] or revArray = list(reversed(array)).

But the first variant is slightly faster:

z = range(1000000)
startTimeTic = time.time()
y = z[::-1]
print("Time: %s s" % (time.time() - startTimeTic))

f = range(1000000)
startTimeTic = time.time()
g = list(reversed(f))
print("Time: %s s" % (time.time() - startTimeTic))

Output:

Time: 0.00489711761475 s
Time: 0.00609302520752 s
  • 2
    Next time, you might want to use timeit. – grooveplex Jul 28 '16 at 8:28

Strictly speaking, the question is not how to return a list in reverse but rather how to reverse a list with an example list name array.

To reverse a list named "array" use array.reverse().

The incredibly useful slice method as described can also be used to reverse a list in place by defining the list as a sliced modification of itself using array = array[::-1].

  • 1
    The last sentence is not true, this does not reverse a list in place; it should say array[:] = array[::-1] – Antti Haapala Feb 16 '15 at 16:17

You can use reversed()

array=[0,10,20,40]

for e in reversed(array):
  print e
def reverse(text):
    output = []
    for i in range(len(text)-1, -1, -1):
        output.append(text[i])
    return output

Use list comprehension:

[array[n] for n in range(len(array)-1, -1, -1)]

The most direct translation of your requirement into Python is this for statement:

for i in xrange(len(array) - 1, -1, -1):
   print i, array[i]

This is rather cryptic but may be useful.

Use the reversed function as follow and print it

>>> for element in reversed(your_array):
...     print element

You could always treat the list like a stack just popping the elements off the top of the stack from the back end of the list. That way you take advantage of first in last out characteristics of a stack. Of course you are consuming the 1st array. I do like this method in that it's pretty intuitive in that you see one list being consumed from the back end while the other is being built from the front end.

>>> l = [1,2,3,4,5,6]; nl=[]
>>> while l:
        nl.append(l.pop())  
>>> print nl
[6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1]
def reverse(text):
    lst=[]
    for i in range(0,len(text)):
        lst.append(text[(len(text)-1)-i])
    return ''.join(lst)

print reverse('reversed')
  • 1
    the question didn't ask about reversing text. – agentp Jul 18 '16 at 14:35
list_data = [1,2,3,4,5]
l = len(list_data)
i=l+1
rev_data = []
while l>0:
  j=i-l
  l-=1
  rev_data.append(list_data[-j])
print "After Rev:- %s" %rev_data 

You can also use the bitwise complement of the array index to step through the array in reverse:

>>> array = [0, 10, 20, 40]
>>> [array[~i] for i, _ in enumerate(array)]
[40, 20, 10, 0]

Whatever you do, don't do it this way.

def reverse(my_list):
  L = len(my_list)
  for i in range(L/2):
    my_list[i], my_list[L-i - 1] = my_list[L-i-1], my_list[i]
  return my_list
>>> l = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]
>>> print(reduce(lambda acc, x: [x] + acc, l, []))
[5, 4, 3, 2, 1]
  • This solution is about 4.5k times slower than l[::-1], and at the same time much less legible. Functional programming in Python is sadly rather slow. – Dakkaron Aug 23 '16 at 13:58

ORGANIZING VALUES:

In Python, lists' order too can be manipulated with sort, organizing your variables in numerical/alphabetical order:

Temporarily:

print(sorted(my_list))

Permanent:

my_list.sort(), print(my_list)

You can sort with the flag "reverse=True":

print(sorted(my_list, reverse=True))

or

my_list.sort(reverse=True), print(my_list)

WITHOUT ORGANIZING

Maybe you do not want to sort values, but only reverse the values. Then we can do it like this:

print(list(reversed(my_list)))

**Numbers have priority over alphabet in listing order. The Python values' organization is awesome.

>>> L = [1, 2, 3, 4]
>>> L = [L[-i] for i in range(1, len(L) + 1)]
>>> L
[4, 3, 2, 1]

Reversing in-place by switching references of opposite indices:

>>> l = [1,2,3,4,5,6,7]    
>>> for i in range(len(l)//2):
...     l[i], l[-1-i] = l[-1-i], l[i]
...
>>> l
[7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1]
  • 1
    Works for odd length lists! – user4776653 Oct 25 '16 at 2:01
  • My solution is right! You know how python implements indexing. From right to left you have 0,1,2... and from left to right you have -1,-2,-3.. etc. To reverse a list, you cut it into two parts and you multiply the indexes on the right by their opposites on the left minus one. – user4776653 Oct 25 '16 at 18:49
  • 1
    The person asking this questions knows the answer already!! There are people who get stuck in job interviews when asked about how to reverse a string or a list without using a built in method!!! – user4776653 Oct 25 '16 at 22:13
  • 1
    I think the downvotes weren't so much about the correctness of the answer, but rather how unclear it was. I actually liked this answer, so I've made some edits to it to help it shine a little better. – Julien Feb 6 '17 at 15:57

Can be done using __reverse__ , which returns a generator.

>>> l = [1,2,3,4,5]
>>> for i in l.__reversed__():
...   print i
... 
5
4
3
2
1
>>>

protected by Jim Fasarakis Hilliard Dec 7 '16 at 14:19

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