7
class MyDerived: public Incredble<Difficult< And<Complicated, Long>>, And<Even, Longer>, BaseClass, Name>
{
public:
  MyDerived();
}


MyDerived::MyDerived
: ???(params)
{}

Is there any way to call a base constructor without writing its full name and without typedeffing it?

The reason is clearly to avoid code duplication and introducing multiple positions to change if a detail in the base class template params changes.

Level 2 of this:

template <uint32 C>
class MyDerived: public Incredble<Difficult< And<Complicated, Long>>, And<Even, Longer>, BaseClass, Name>
{
public:
  MyDerived();
}

template <uint32 C>
MyDerived::MyDerived<C> 
: ???(C)
{
}
4
  • 1
    What's wrong with using or typedef?
    – max66
    Sep 9, 2016 at 13:50
  • 1
    its polluting the enclosing namespace Sep 9, 2016 at 13:52
  • depending on your constructor you can use using and constructor delegation (which does not pollute namespace). Depends if you have issues with parameters or templates.
    – Hayt
    Sep 9, 2016 at 13:54
  • 1
    @vlad_tepesch: You can use a typedef in an anonymous namespace { ... } so it doesn't leak outside of its .cpp file.
    – Thomas
    Sep 9, 2016 at 13:59

2 Answers 2

10

You could use injected-class-name. Incredible<...>::Incredible refers to itself, and since MyDerived isn't a class template, unqualified lookup will look in the scope of its base classes:

MyDerived::MyDerived
: Incredble(params)
{}

If Incredible is a dependent name, then you need to qualify it. You can actually simply use the derived type name to qualify the base class's injected-class-name (h/t Johannes Schaub-litb):

MyDerived::MyDerived
: MyDerived::Incredible(params)
{}

This will work in all cases.

5
  • 1
    does this change if MyDerived is a classe tempate? because it is for me but the template parameter. i can add this to the initial question Sep 9, 2016 at 13:56
  • detail namespaces are always nice.
    – Hayt
    Sep 9, 2016 at 13:56
  • @vlad_tepesch The answer already addresses this case - you can't use injected-class-name, but you can always add an alias or alias template in a non-public namespace
    – Barry
    Sep 9, 2016 at 14:37
  • 5
    If it is a class template, : MyDerived::Incredible(params) { } should just work. Sep 9, 2016 at 23:24
  • 2
    @JohannesSchaub-litb Wow. That's the trick I've been missing. That seems superior to all the other solutions here and worthy of its own answer. So qualifying with the derived class name makes the injected base class type visible when the base is a template. I guess that makes sense, given that we have to use this-> to get at its members, etc. I just might never have thought of trying it without you pointing it out! Sep 10, 2016 at 9:35
0

If you don't wont to use using or typedef to avoid "polluting the enclosing namespace", you can use using inside the class/struct.

An example

#include <map>

template <typename ...>
class foo
 {};

struct A : public foo<int, std::tuple<long, char, std::map<std::string, int>>>
 {
   using base_t = foo<int, std::tuple<long, char, std::map<std::string, int>>>;

   A () : base_t{}
    { };
 };

int main()
 { } 
5
  • 2
    You used the Incredble class name two times.
    – Liviu
    Sep 9, 2016 at 13:59
  • 1
    @Liviu - that's right; but you can use base_t for other purposes in the same class (other constructors, by example); to avoid the duplication you can define base_t outside the struct but you pollute the external namespace
    – max66
    Sep 9, 2016 at 14:03
  • deriving from stl object is in general no good idea. I mean the idea is OK but the example is bad
    – Hayt
    Sep 9, 2016 at 14:03
  • @Hayt - I'm agree; modified example.
    – max66
    Sep 9, 2016 at 14:09
  • @max66 "you pollute the external namespace" only if you dump the typedef in it without thinking to use a local detail namespace or w/e. Sep 10, 2016 at 9:29

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