1

I have a problem related with a one-to-one relationship in Entity Framework 6.1.3.

I have 2 classes.

public class Package
{
    public Guid Id { get; set; }
    public string PackageNo { get; set; }
    public double SendingCost{ get; set; }
    public virtual PackageAppointment PackageAppointment { get; set; }
}

public class PackageAppointment 
{
    public DateTime Date { get; set; }
    public virtual Package Package { get; set; }
}

and the map class for PackageAppointment is:

public class PackageAppointmentMap
{
    public PackageAppointmentMap()
    {
        Property(x => x.Date).IsRequired();

        HasRequired(x => x.Package).WithOptional(x => x.PackageAppointment).Map(x => x.MapKey("PackageId"));

    }
}

Everything works fine. I don't have any issue with the relationship. The problem is querying database. Every time I query the Package entity in the database using the context, the SQL Server profiler generates something like this.

LINQ query:

var data = await Task.Run(() => GenericService.GetAll().Select(x => x.PackageNo));

SQL Server profiler:

SELECT 
    [Extent1].[Id] AS [Id], 
    [Extent1].[PackageNo] AS [PackageNo], 
    [Extent1].[SendingCost] AS [SendingCost],    
    [Extent2].[Id] AS [Id1]   
FROM    
    [dbo].[Package] AS [Extent1]
LEFT OUTER JOIN 
    [dbo].[PackageAppointment] AS [Extent2] ON [Extent1].[Id] = [Extent2].[PackageId]

Every query I do using context.Package... without retrieving data form the PackageAppointment (or any other one to one relationship) Entity Framework generates a left outer join.

The actual condition in my project is that Package entity has 5 one to one relationships. The performance is very low because of this.

Maybe I should change the relationship or something else. Really i don't know what to do to fix this performance issue.

Please advise.

  • Where is the PK of the PackageAppointment entity? – Ivan Stoev Sep 9 '16 at 16:09
  • Is there a benefit to separating the models in the database? Personally I try not to have any true 1-to-1 relationships in the db as it usually indicates a desire to split it conceptually in the business logic (code) and not in the persistence layer. – Igor Sep 9 '16 at 16:09
  • The problem is in your GetAll method, can you post it? – Ivan Stoev Sep 9 '16 at 16:16
  • The actual condition in my project is that Package entity has 5 one to one relationships. The performance is very low because of this <= what does Sql Profiler show you when you profiled the query execution? Are there missing indexes on the FK fields? Are you sure the slowness is caused by the join and not something else like retrieving too much data in 1 call? – Igor Sep 9 '16 at 16:19
  • 1
    So why then I'm getting a correct SQL? Can you provide minimal reproducible example? – Ivan Stoev Sep 9 '16 at 16:41
3

You can change your relationship between Package and PackageAppointment to this:

public PackageAppointmentMap()
{
    Property(x => x.Date).IsRequired();

    HasOptional(x => x.Package)
        .WithOptionalPrincipal(x => x.PackageAppointment)
        .Map(x => x.MapKey("PackageAppointmentId"));
}

This will make your Package table contain FK PackageAppontmentId, and your query will not have this join. Also changing relationship to Package.HasRequired(x=>x.PackageAppointment) will also work (for possible reason see below)

After that accessing Packages:

var query = dbContext.Packages.ToString();

Returns:

SELECT
    1 AS [C1],
    [Extent1].[Id] AS [Id],
    [Extent1].[PackageNo] AS [PackageNo],
    [Extent1].[SendingCost] AS [SendingCost],
    [Extent1].[PackageAppointmentId] AS [PackageAppointmentId]
    FROM [dbo].[Packages] AS [Extent1]

On the other hand, accessing PackageAppointmentss:

var anotherQuery = dbContext.PackageAppointments.ToString();

Will result in query:

SELECT
    1 AS [C1],
    [Extent1].[Id] AS [Id],
    [Extent1].[Date] AS [Date],
    [Extent2].[Id] AS [Id1]
    FROM  [dbo].[PackageAppointments] AS [Extent1]
    LEFT OUTER JOIN [dbo].[Packages] AS [Extent2] ON ([Extent2].[PackageAppointmentId] IS NOT NULL) AND ([Extent1].[Id] = [Extent2].[PackageAppointmentId])

[EDIT]

Why this happens?

It mostly looks like this is done for Change Tracking.

Scenario:

You have a PackageAppointment that has a required Package. That means, that your PackageAppointment table has Foreign Key PackageId, so when you load PackageAppointment, change tracker has all the information about PackageAppointment to track all possible changes to the entity, and changing PackageAppointment.Package reference is tracked easily - you compare PackageAppointment.PackageId in the entity that you loaded even if you did not really load a record from Package table, that's associated with that PackageAppointment (lazy loading = off).

On the other hand, if you load Package, you have a property PackageAppointment that you can change to reference another PackageAppointment. But to track this change, you have to somehow get PackageAppointment.Id associated with this Package. Since Package table has no Foreign Key from itself to PackageAppointment table, you have to make a join to get PackageAppointment.Id, associated with this Package. In other words, if you don't do this join, change tracking for this entity will be ineffective and will make you load referenced PackageAppointment if you do any change to it, which might have been ineffective.

To prove that, try putting .AsNoTracking() for this specific query and check the query returned.

So the code

var trackingQuery = dbContext.PackageAppointments.ToString();

Console.WriteLine("==========================");
Console.WriteLine("Query with Change Tracker enabled");
Console.WriteLine(trackingQuery);
Console.WriteLine("==========================");
Console.WriteLine("\n\n");

var noTrackingQuery = dbContext.PackageAppointments.AsNoTracking().ToString();

Console.WriteLine("==========================");
Console.WriteLine("Query with Change Tracker disabled");
Console.WriteLine(noTrackingQuery);
Console.WriteLine("==========================");

Results to the following output:

==========================
Query with Change Tracker enabled
SELECT
    1 AS [C1],
    [Extent1].[Id] AS [Id],
    [Extent1].[Date] AS [Date],
    [Extent2].[Id] AS [Id1]
    FROM  [dbo].[PackageAppointments] AS [Extent1]
    LEFT OUTER JOIN [dbo].[Packages] AS [Extent2] ON ([Extent2].[PackageAppointmentId] IS NOT NULL) AND ([Extent1].[Id] = [Extent2].[PackageAppointmentId])
==========================



==========================
Query with Change Tracker disabled
SELECT
    [Extent1].[Id] AS [Id],
    [Extent1].[Date] AS [Date]
    FROM [dbo].[PackageAppointments] AS [Extent1]
==========================

As you can see, LEFT OUTER JOIN magically disappeared here, which proves that this is related to Change Tracking system.

  • If i change the relationship it means I'm changing the logic. That's not my purpose here. The key here is "Why this happens? Probably, it's a lazy loading support". I'm not sure but i think lazy is not the problem. I don't know exactly why that happends. That's what i want to know. I don't think it's necessary generates a left outer join for nothing if you don't need this data. – Rayko Sep 9 '16 at 19:47
  • @Rayko I edited the post, take a look at the bottom of it now. – Red Sep 9 '16 at 20:45

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