Currently I'm learning concurrency programming in Java. I notice LockSupport.park() introduced in Java 1.6 is much easier than Object.wait() to use, a typical usage of Object.wait() is like

// Thread1
synchronized (lock) {
    while (condition != true) {
        lock.wait()
    }

    // do stuff
}

// Thread2
synchronized (lock) {
    condition = true;
    lock.notify();
}

And I think I can rewrite it using LockSupport.park() like

// Thread1
while (condition != true) {
    LockSupport.park();
}

// do stuff

// Thread2
condition = true;
LockSupport.unpark(Thread1);

By using LockSupport.park(), tedious synchroinzed block disappears.

My question is, should I always prefer LockSupport.park() than Object.wait()? Is there any aspect that Object.wait() does better than LockSupport.park() such as performance?

  • I'm not sure, but one thing that comes to mind is that it's not clear from the docs whether LockSupport's methods provide any of the memory visibility guarantees that synchronization provides (happens-before edges and all that). – yshavit Sep 9 '16 at 16:12
  • See also question Practical examples of LockSupport/AbstractQueuedSynchronizer. – Kayaman Sep 9 '16 at 17:00
up vote 4 down vote accepted

The idea behind wait/notify is that the notifications are not thread-specific, the notifier doesn't have to know the specific thread that needs notifying, it just tells the lock (or condition, for a ReentrantLock) that it's notifying, and the lock and OS scheduler between them decide who gets the notification.

I would expect most of the time the notifier wouldn't want to have to know what thread needs unparking so wait/notify would be a better choice for those cases. With park/unpark your code has to know more and there will be more opportunities for failure. You may think a synchronized block is tedious but what will really be tedious is sorting out cases where something doesn't get unparked when it should have.

Note in your second example your condition needs to be volatile or Atomic or otherwise something where its updates are visible across threads.

  • After exploring javadoc of related Classes, I have realized that replacement for wait() is Condition, and for synchroinzed it is Lock. Condition need to be derived from Lock also mirrors the relationship of wait() and synchronized. LockSupport.park() is the base of them. – dyng Sep 12 '16 at 0:39

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