2

Two questions really...

Firstly, which is the better coding style when writing jQuery functions which take object params, should the function take a jQuery object or is it better to pass a standard JavaScript object and have the function itself do the wrapping? I guess I'm just asking if there is a standard here, since it might not always be obvious to someone who wants to call the function.

And secondly, how do you test if an object is a jQuery object? Ideally it would be nice if the function could take either, so...

function(obj) {
    var $obj;
    if (isJQuery(obj)) {
        $obj = obj;
    }
    else {
        $obj = $(obj);
    }
    // ....
}

or do you even need to do this? will $(obj) simply return if the object is already a jQuery object, so you can always attempt to wrap and it doesn't matter?

2 Answers 2

8

You can test for the .jquery property (which is on the prototype of jQuery objects), like this:

function(obj) {
  var $obj = obj.jquery ? obj : $(obj);
}

This is what jQuery core does internally as well.


Update: My ticket filed as a result of this question was completed, you can now find the .jquery property in the official API documentation.


Edit: as @T.J. points out in comments this isn't currently in the official API, however it's been around since jQuery 1.0 and I'm pretty sure it isn't going anywhere. All the same based on comment discussions (thanks T.J.), I submitted an enhancement ticket to hopefully get this added to the API documentation, you can track its progress here: http://bugs.jquery.com/ticket/7200

10
  • I can totally see why jQuery does that (to play nice cross-window), but I'd use instanceof in my own application (rather than library) code, just because it's so standard whereas the .jquery property is undocumented and could change in a dot release. Oct 15, 2010 at 11:21
  • 1
    @TJCrowder - I highly doubt it's going to change, it's how jQuery does their versioning. Why not go with what always works? This goes back to version 1.0: github.com/jquery/jquery/blob/1.0/src/jquery/jquery.js#L88 Oct 15, 2010 at 11:23
  • 1
    @Nick: See my response to you on the other answer. Frankly, they should document it. Just because something hasn't changed doesn't mean it won't. Relying on undocumented features is almost always a bad idea and one's knee-jerk reaction should be not to. I'm not saying one never does it, and I'm not saying I won't use the above in cross-window situations, just that one should be reluctant to rely on undocumented things when there's a simple, viable alternative. Oct 15, 2010 at 11:37
  • @TJCrowder - That's not a bad suggestion at all, I'll put in a jQuery ticket later today to see if it can be added to the documented API. To be clear though, you're making assumptions as to what's viable, it really depends on the situation. Oct 15, 2010 at 11:38
  • @Nick: :-) I was thinking of doing the same, I'll leave it to you. Oct 15, 2010 at 11:45
4

I would think something along these lines:

    if (obj instanceof jQuery) {
        $obj = obj;
    }
    else {
        $obj = $(obj);
    }

will $(obj) simply return if the object is already a jQuery object, so you can always attempt to wrap and it doesn't matter?

Well, it returns a clone of the jQuery object that you pass (see the documentation). This may probably result in unintended behavior.

7
  • I don't understand why this is so much less modded-up than Nick's answer. This is using normal, straightforward JavaScript structure. Oct 15, 2010 at 11:18
  • 1
    That said, you might want to mention that it will only work with jQuery instances created by the jQuery function you have. If you receive an object from another window (not uncommon), it may be a jQuery instance from the jQuery function in that window, in which case instanceof will be false (because you're testing against the wrong function). But for the vast majority of people not writing libraries and such, this is an edge case. Oct 15, 2010 at 11:19
  • @T.J. Crowder: After reading your explanation, I would think Nick's answer got more upvotes because it's more reliable than instanceof, and OP is intending to write a library/function anyway. Didn't realize the cross-window issues though.
    – BoltClock
    Oct 15, 2010 at 11:21
  • @BoltClock: Depends on your definition of "reliable." :-) Nick's relies on an undocumented aspect of jQuery that could change in a dot release (1.4.2 to 1.4.3, for example). I don't like doing that unless I have a really good reason to. Unless you're writing a library, or an application where you specifically know you're dealing with cross-window issues, there's no need. Oct 15, 2010 at 11:23
  • @TJCrowder - I have to disagree here, it's never changed, has existed from the beginning and many things use this, it's not going anywhere, why would it? It's their only versioning mechanism, the same way the UI team adapted later. Also just to note, this doesn't work in a number of jQuery.noConflict(true) scenarios as well. Oct 15, 2010 at 11:28

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