97

I have some code:

enum Color {
    Red,
    Green,
    Blue
}

function getColorName(c: Color): string {
    switch(c) {
        case Color.Red:
            return 'red';
        case Color.Green:
            return 'green';
        // Forgot about Blue
    }

    throw new Error('Did not expect to be here');
}

I forgot to handle the Color.Blue case and I'd prefer to have gotten a compile error. How can I structure my code such that TypeScript flags this as an error?

  • 1
    Just wanted to inform people there's a two-line solution from @Carlos Gines if you scroll down far enough. – Noumenon May 15 at 17:34

10 Answers 10

119

To do this, we'll use the never type (introduced in TypeScript 2.0) which represents values which "shouldn't" occur.

First step is to write a function:

function assertUnreachable(x: never): never {
    throw new Error("Didn't expect to get here");
}

Then use it in the default case (or equivalently, outside the switch):

function getColorName(c: Color): string {
    switch(c) {
        case Color.Red:
            return 'red';
        case Color.Green:
            return 'green';
    }
    return assertUnreachable(c);
}

At this point, you'll see an error:

return assertUnreachable(c);
       ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
       Type "Color.Blue" is not assignable to type "never"

The error message indicates the cases you forgot to include in your exhaustive switch! If you left off multiple values, you'd see an error about e.g. Color.Blue | Color.Yellow.

Note that if you're using strictNullChecks, you'll need that return in front of the assertUnreachable call (otherwise it's optional).

You can get a little fancier if you like. If you're using a discriminated union, for example, it can be useful to recover the discriminant property in the assertion function for debugging purposes. It looks like this:

// Discriminated union using string literals
interface Dog {
    species: "canine";
    woof: string;
}
interface Cat {
    species: "feline";
    meow: string;
}
interface Fish {
    species: "pisces";
    meow: string;
}
type Pet = Dog | Cat | Fish;

// Externally-visible signature
function throwBadPet(p: never): never;
// Implementation signature
function throwBadPet(p: Pet) {
    throw new Error('Unknown pet kind: ' + p.species);
}

function meetPet(p: Pet) {
    switch(p.species) {
        case "canine":
            console.log("Who's a good boy? " + p.woof);
            break;
        case "feline":
            console.log("Pretty kitty: " + p.meow);
            break;
        default:
            // Argument of type 'Fish' not assignable to 'never'
            throwBadPet(p);
    }
}

This is a nice pattern because you get compile-time safety for making sure you handled all the cases you expected to. And if you do get a truly out-of-scope property (e.g. some JS caller made up a new species), you can throw a useful error message.

| improve this answer | |
  • 3
    With strictNullChecks enabled, isn't it enough to define the function's return type as string, without needing an assertUnreachable function at all? – dbandstra Jun 22 '17 at 21:50
  • 1
    @dbandstra You can certainly do that, but as a generic pattern, the assertUnreachable is more dependable. It works even without strictNullChecks and also continues to work if there are conditions where you want to return undefined from outside the switch. – Letharion Jun 26 '17 at 8:37
  • This doesn't seem to work when the enum is defined in an external d.ts file. At least I can't get it to work with the enum Office.MailboxEnums.RecipientType from Microsofts Office JS add-in API. – Søren Boisen Sep 18 '18 at 21:52
  • the above solution works for the basic example in the original description, however, I am not certain that it's a generally applicable pattern. Swap out the color enum with type InDiscriminant = { a: string } | { b: string } and how can one proceed? A simple switch no longer knows all of the stringy values, and there aren't common properties among member types of the union to discriminate over. Is there an idiomatic solution for this case? – cdaringe Nov 9 '19 at 17:13
  • noUnusedParameters tsconfig set up will throw a "x is never used error" which you can fix by prefixing with underscore function assertUnreachable(_x: never): never { throw new Error("Didn't expect to get here"); } – jbmilgrom Jan 30 at 21:32
31

You don't need to use never or add anything to the end of your switch.

If

  • Your switch statement returns in each case
  • You have the strictNullChecks typescript compilation flag turned on
  • Your function has a specified return type
  • The return type is not undefined or void

You will get an error if your switch statement is non-exhaustive as there will be a case where nothing is returned.

From your example, if you do

function getColorName(c: Color): string {
    switch(c) {
        case Color.Red:
            return 'red';
        case Color.Green:
            return 'green';
        // Forgot about Blue
    }
}

You will get the following compilation error:

Function lacks ending return statement and return type does not include undefined.

| improve this answer | |
  • This solution require to explicitly specify all possible return values of a function. In other cases we can omit them and let compiler do type inference. – Aleksei Jun 19 '19 at 13:28
  • yes, the compiler will complain, but you should also consider, that you could still get a wrong value at runtime. In such a case, I prefer to throw a meaningful error-message (instead of implicitly returning undefined) – TmTron Jun 19 '19 at 16:38
  • 6
    The idea is not to return undefined, but to create the missing branch of the case statement. This way you would not get an error at runtime and there is no need to throw anything. – Marcelo Lazaroni Jun 20 '19 at 10:42
  • 3
    The code works exactly as described. If you will ignore the type and consider that c could be anything there is no reason to use TypeScript at all. If c could be null or undefined, the type should say that and the implementation would then take that into account. – Marcelo Lazaroni Jun 30 '19 at 19:20
  • 1
    This solution works to trigger a typescript error, but the error is not always clear. I prefer to use a default case with an unused variable typed as never with a comment explaining "hey bud, if you're getting an error here, you forgot to add a case". YMMV. – Matthias Oct 17 '19 at 18:01
20

Solution

What I do is to define an error class:

export class UnreachableCaseError extends Error {
  constructor(val: never) {
    super(`Unreachable case: ${JSON.stringify(val)}`);
  }
}

and then throw this error in the default case:

enum Color {
    Red,
    Green,
    Blue
}

function getColorName(c: Color): string {
  switch(c) {
      case Color.Red:
          return 'red, red wine';
      case Color.Green:
          return 'greenday';
      case Color.Blue:
          return "Im blue, daba dee daba";
      default:
          // Argument of type 'c' not assignable to 'never'
          throw new UnreachableCaseError(c);
  }
}

I think it's easier to read than the function approach recommended by Ryan, because the throw clause has the default syntax highlighting.

Hint

The ts-essentials library has a class UnreachableCaseError exactly for this use-case

Runtime considerations

Note, that typescript code is transpiled to javascript: Thus all the typescript typechecks only work at compile time and do not exist at runtime: i.e. there is no guarantee that the variable c is really of type Color.
This is different from other languages: e.g. Java will also check the types at runtime and would throw a meaningful error if you tried to call the function with an argument of wrong type - but javascript doesn't.

This is the reason why it is important to throw a meaningful exception in the default case: Stackblitz: throw meaningful error

If you didn't do this, the function getColorName() would implicitly return undefined (when called with an unexpected argument): Stackblitz: return any

In the examples above, we directly used a variable of type any to illustrate the issue. This will hopefully not happen in real-world projects - but there are many other ways, that you could get a variable of a wrong type at runtime.
Here are some, that I have already seen (and I made some of these mistakes myself):

  • using angular forms - these are not type-safe: all form field-values are of type any
    ng-forms Stackblitz example
  • implicit any is allowed
  • an external value is used and not validated (e.g. http-response from the server is just cast to an interface)
  • we read a value from local-storage that an older version of the app has written (these values have changed, so the new logic does not understand the old value)
  • we use some 3rd party libs that are not type-safe (or simply have a bug)

So don't be lazy and write this additional default case - it can safe you a lot of headaches...

| improve this answer | |
  • note, that you can currently not use instanceof checks for subclasses of Error: see issue#13965 which also mentions a workaround – TmTron Feb 6 '19 at 10:23
  • I checked it and it works correctly now. TypeScript 3.5.1. – Aleksei Jun 19 '19 at 13:26
  • 1
    Ooooh, this is beautiful, and also almost exactly how I would write the code, if I was writing in plain JS. – Pete Jan 17 at 13:10
  • How does the compiler find this? – jocull Mar 18 at 3:04
  • @jocull not sure what you are asking for. Maybe you want to read about Discriminated Unions? – TmTron Mar 18 at 7:10
17

Building on top of Ryan's answer, I discovered here that there is no need for any extra function. We can do directly:

function getColorName(c: Color): string {
  switch (c) {
    case Color.Red:
      return "red";
    case Color.Green:
      return "green";
    // Forgot about Blue
    default:
      const _exhaustiveCheck: never = c;
      throw new Error("How did we get here?");
  }
}

You can see it in action here in TS Playground

| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    I prefer using variable too, instead of creating a function (though both might get stripped at bundle time). In any case, your linter may complain about an unused variable, and you'll have to add something like this above it: // eslint-disable-next-line @typescript-eslint/no-unused-vars – Matthias Oct 17 '19 at 18:04
  • 2
    Or, you can use the variable in the error you throw, something like: throw new Error(`Unexpected: ${_exhaustiveCheck}`); – Nooodles Jan 7 at 8:19
  • Nice idea. You could also define an anonymous function: default: ((x: never) => { throw new Error(c + " was unhandled."); })(c); – Brady Holt May 14 at 19:39
  • I can confirm that @Nooodles solution satisfies SonarQube unused variables check. Thanks. Love how terse this is. – Noumenon May 15 at 17:18
  • I addressed some related (I think these might be pretty frequent) errors from the code above like this: default: { const pleaseBeExhaustive: never = c; throw new Error(`Use all Color - ${pleaseBeExhaustive as string}`); } – Jonny Sep 23 at 9:13
8

typescript-eslint has "exhaustiveness checking in switch with union type" rule:
@typescript-eslint/switch-exhaustiveness-check

| improve this answer | |
4

As a nice twist on Ryan's answer, you can replace never with an arbitrary string to make the error message more user friendly.

function assertUnreachable(x: 'error: Did you forget to handle this type?'): never {
    throw new Error("Didn't expect to get here");
}

Now, you get:

return assertUnreachable(c);
       ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
       Type "Color.Blue" is not assignable to type "error: Did you forget to handle this type?"

This works because never can be assigned to anything, including an arbitrary string.

| improve this answer | |
2

Building on top of Ryan and Carlos' answers, you can use an anonymous method to avoid having to create a separate named function:

function getColorName(c: Color): string {
  switch (c) {
    case Color.Red:
      return "red";
    case Color.Green:
      return "green";
    // Forgot about Blue
    default:
      ((x: never) => {
        throw new Error(`${x} was unhandled!`);
      })(c);
  }
}

If your switch is not exhaustive, you'll get a compile time error.

| improve this answer | |
1

In really simple cases when you just need to return some string by enum value it's easier (IMHO) to use some constant to store dictionary of results instead of using switch. For example:

enum Color {
    Red,
    Green,
    Blue
}

function getColorName(c: Color): string {
  const colorNames: Record<Color, string> = {
    [Color.Red]: `I'm red`,
    [Color.Green]: `I'm green`,
    [Color.Blue]: `I'm blue, dabudi dabudai`,   
  }

  return colorNames[c] || ''
}

So here you will have to mention every enum value in constant, otherwise you get an error like, for example, if Blue is missing:

TS2741: Property 'Blue' is missing in type '{ [Color.Red]: string; [Color.Green]: string;' but required in type 'Record'.

However it's often not the case and then it's really better to throw an error just like Ryan Cavanaugh proposed.

Also I was a bit upset when found that this won't work also:

function getColorName(c: Color): string {
    switch(c) {
        case Color.Red:
            return 'red';
        case Color.Green:
            return 'green';
    }
    return '' as never // I had some hope that it rises a type error, but it doesn't :)
}
| improve this answer | |
1

To avoid Typescript or linter warnings:

    default:
        ((_: never): void => {})(c);

in context:

function getColorName(c: Color): string {
    switch(c) {
        case Color.Red:
            return 'red';
        case Color.Green:
            return 'green';
        default:
            ((_: never): void => {})(c);
    }
}

The difference between this solution and the others is

  • there are no unreferenced named variables
  • it does not throw an exception since Typescript will enforce that the code will never execute anyway
| improve this answer | |
  • Explain what the code does in details and how it differs with other answers – Sujitmohanty30 Aug 14 at 16:52
-1

Create a custom function instead of using a switch statement.

export function exhaustSwitch<T extends string, TRet>(
  value: T,
  map: { [x in T]: () => TRet }
): TRet {
  return map[value]();
}

Example usage

type MyEnum = 'a' | 'b' | 'c';

const v = 'a' as MyEnum;

exhaustSwitch(v, {
  a: () => 1,
  b: () => 1,
  c: () => 1,
});

If you later add d to MyEnum, you will receive an error Property 'd' is missing in type ...

| improve this answer | |
  • This only works if your enum values are strings since they need to be encoded as keys in the object parameter map. – Will Madden Sep 9 '19 at 13:43

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