41

I have a class with an attribute I wish to turn into a property, but this attribute is set within __init__. Not sure how this should be done. Without setting the property in __init__ this is easy and works well

import datetime

class STransaction(object):
    """A statement transaction"""
    def __init__(self):
        self._date = None

    @property
    def date(self):
        return self._date

    @date.setter
    def date(self, value):
        d = datetime.datetime.strptime(value, "%d-%b-%y")
        self._date = d

st = STransaction()
st.date = "20-Jan-10"

But once initialization needs to occur in __init__ it gets more complicated and I am not sure of the correct course of action.

class STransaction(object):
    """A statement transaction"""
    def __init__(self, date):
        self._date = None

Strangely to me, the following seems to work but smells very bad.

class STransaction(object):
    """A statement transaction"""
    def __init__(self, date):
        self._date = None
        self.date = date

    @property
    def date(self):
        return self._date

    @date.setter
    def date(self, value):
        d = datetime.datetime.strptime(value, "%d-%b-%y")
        self._date = d

What is the correct way to go about setting properties in __init__?

Thanks, Aaron.

2
  • 1
    In general, is there any reason to set self._date = None before updating the property since it will be immediately overwritten with the new value? Oct 15, 2010 at 13:39
  • No. It only makes sense if the second line is absent to prevent the getter being called with no attribute "_date" set
    – nerdoc
    Nov 17, 2013 at 14:52

2 Answers 2

29

I do not see any real problem with your code. In __init__, the class is fully created and thus the properties accessible.

3
  • Ok, so perhaps I am looking at this the wrong way. At the point of init is the property already created so my call to self.date is accessing via the property is the same way that my call to st.date is? Oct 15, 2010 at 12:01
  • 10
    Yes, exactly (why does Stackoverflow dislike short, to-the-point messages? - it refused to post just "Yes, exactly"). Oct 15, 2010 at 12:03
  • +1 Perfectly right. I would add that the self._date = None in init is really useless in this code (You can in some cases put the initialization of properties hidden variables in the getter using RAII ( if not hasattr(self,_smth): do initialization...)
    – ThR37
    Oct 15, 2010 at 12:05
10
class STransaction(object):
    """A statement transaction"""
    def __init__(self, date):
        self._date = None #1
        self.date = date  #2

If you want to set the proxy field self._date without executing of your setter use the #1 line. If you would like to execute the setter at startup too use the #2. Both ways are correct, it's just a matter of what do you want to do.

1
  • 3
    Why would you want to set _date to None when init clearly is called with some particular date? You should store the correct value, hence #1 is not viable.
    – Nas Banov
    Dec 8, 2012 at 20:09

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