178

What's the most efficient way to test if an array contains any element from a second array?

Two examples below, attempting to answer the question does foods contain any element from cheeses:

cheeses = %w(chedder stilton brie mozzarella feta haloumi reblochon)
foods = %w(pizza feta foods bread biscuits yoghurt bacon)

puts cheeses.collect{|c| foods.include?(c)}.include?(true)

puts (cheeses - foods).size < cheeses.size

5 Answers 5

305
(cheeses & foods).empty?

As Marc-André Lafortune said in comments, & works in linear time while any? + include? will be quadratic. For larger sets of data, linear time will be faster. For small data sets, any? + include? may be faster as shown by Lee Jarvis' answer -- probably because & allocates a new Array while another solution does not and works as a simple nested loop to return a boolean.

8
  • 3
    When checking if an array contains an element from another array, wouldn't it make more sense to do (cheeses & foods).any? as this returns a true value if the arrays' do in fact contain any of the same elements? Jul 15, 2014 at 21:46
  • 1
    @RyanFrancis, docs: any?: The method returns true if the block ever returns a value other than false or nil. empty?: Returns true if self contains no elements.
    – Nakilon
    Jul 15, 2014 at 22:40
  • 3
    @Nakilon I'm also confused why answer isn't (cheeses & foods).any? isn't the OP's question: if any foods are in cheeses? In his example, "feta" is in both, so result should be true, right? So why check .empty? on the intersection?
    – mswieboda
    Mar 4, 2016 at 21:19
  • @SuckerForMayhem, because OP's question is "If any are ...?", not just "If any?". If "are ..." is omitted it's assumed to be "If any is True?" and would return False for array like [false, false, false], while it obviously is not empty.
    – Nakilon
    Mar 4, 2016 at 22:04
  • Is there any implementation in activerecord level? Apr 27, 2018 at 2:40
44

How about Enumerable#any?

>> cheeses = %w(chedder stilton brie mozzarella feta haloumi)
=> ["chedder", "stilton", "brie", "mozzarella", "feta", "haloumi"]
>> foods = %w(pizza feta foods bread biscuits yoghurt bacon)
=> ["pizza", "feta", "foods", "bread", "biscuits", "yoghurt", "bacon"]
>> foods.any? {|food| cheeses.include?(food) }
=> true

Benchmark script:

require "benchmark"
N = 1_000_000
puts "ruby version: #{RUBY_VERSION}"

CHEESES = %w(chedder stilton brie mozzarella feta haloumi).freeze
FOODS = %w(pizza feta foods bread biscuits yoghurt bacon).freeze

Benchmark.bm(15) do |b|
  b.report("&, empty?") { N.times { (FOODS & CHEESES).empty? } }
  b.report("any?, include?") { N.times { FOODS.any? {|food| CHEESES.include?(food) } } }
end

Result:

ruby version: 2.1.9
                      user     system      total        real
&, empty?         1.170000   0.000000   1.170000 (  1.172507)
any?, include?    0.660000   0.000000   0.660000 (  0.666015)
3
  • You can improve this by turning cheeses into a set.
    – akuhn
    Dec 26, 2016 at 1:00
  • 1
    Ran my own benchmark here on ruby 2.2.7 and 2.3.4 and any?, include? was the fastest, set disjoint the slowest: gist.github.com/jaredmoody/d2a1e83de2f91fd6865920cd01a8b497
    – Jared
    May 3, 2017 at 17:25
  • 6
    This benchmark is biased by the specific example mentioned and does not necessarily hold in a more general case. What if there were no common elements between the two arrays? What if the arrays were in a different order on each pass? What if feta appeared at the end of both arrays? As Marc-André stated, set intersection executes in linear time, so it makes sense that it is much more scalable for the general case, rather than the one specific example used purely to clarify the question. Jun 19, 2017 at 7:00
26

You can check if the intersection is empty.

cheeses = %w(chedder stilton brie mozzarella feta haloumi)
foods = %w(pizza feta foods bread biscuits yoghurt bacon)
foods & cheeses
=> ["feta"] 
(foods & cheeses).empty?
=> false
3
require "benchmark"
N = 1_000_000
puts "ruby version: #{RUBY_VERSION}"

CHEESES = %w(chedder stilton brie mozzarella feta haloumi).freeze
FOODS = %w(pizza feta foods bread biscuits yoghurt bacon).freeze

Benchmark.bm(15) do |b|
  b.report("&, empty?") { N.times { (FOODS & CHEESES).empty? } }  
  b.report("any?, include?") { N.times { FOODS.any? {|food| CHEESES.include?(food) } } }  
  b.report("disjoint?") { N.times { FOODS.to_set.disjoint? CHEESES.to_set }}
end  
                      user     system      total        real
&, empty?         0.751068   0.000571   0.751639 (  0.752745)
any?, include?    0.408251   0.000133   0.408384 (  0.408438)
disjoint?        11.616006   0.014806  11.630812 ( 11.637300)
1
Set.new(cheeses).disjoint? Set.new(foods)
3
  • 1
    Also in my (unscientific) benchmark, set disjoint was significantly slower than other methods: gist.github.com/jaredmoody/d2a1e83de2f91fd6865920cd01a8b497
    – Jared
    May 3, 2017 at 17:24
  • 1
    Thanks for your comments. I'm not sure why it wasn't Set.new but I just edited it. I tried your performance benchmarks in 2.4.1. Mine did better but still not best using disjointed sets containing more words. I put my version in a comment on your gist. I also think disjoint? is very elegant, especially compared to "any?, include?". The original question did ask about both elegant and efficient. May 4, 2017 at 18:24
  • .to_set method can be useful here cheeses.to_set.disjoint?(foods.to_set)
    – itsnikolay
    Nov 8, 2018 at 22:09

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