3

I need to create ONE integrated script that sets some environment variables, downloads a file using wget and runs it.

The challenge is that it needs to be the SAME script that can run on both Windows PowerShell and also bash / shell.

This is the shell script:

#!/bin/bash
# download a script
wget http://www.example.org/my.script -O my.script
# set a couple of environment variables
export script_source=http://www.example.org
export some_value=floob
# now execute the downloaded script
bash ./my.script

This is the same thing in PowerShell:

wget http://www.example.org/my.script -O my.script.ps1
$env:script_source="http://www.example.org"
$env:some_value="floob"
PowerShell -File ./my.script.ps1

So I wonder if somehow these two scripts can be merged and run successfully on either platform?

I've been trying to find a way to put them in the same script and get bash and PowerShell.exe to ignore errors but have had no success doing so.

Any guesses?

  • 2
    Have you read this? stackoverflow.com/questions/17510688/… – idjaw Sep 9 '16 at 23:55
  • 1
    you may use PowerShell v6-alpha – Jaqueline Vanek Sep 10 '16 at 0:10
  • 1
    Wow, if PowerShell v6 can do that, it would be impressive. With bash available the latest versions of Windows 10, might that solve your problem as well? – Burt_Harris Sep 10 '16 at 1:06
  • NB. that's not "the same thing in PowerShell" for wget because -O is ambiguous between -OutputFile, -OutputVariable and -OutputBuffer. (Unless you have installed wget.exe for Windows and removed the wget alias, but that's not default, so you should say if you have). – TessellatingHeckler Sep 10 '16 at 2:56
7

It is possible; I don't know how compatible this is, but PowerShell treats strings as text and they end up on screen, Bash treats them as commands and tries to run them, and both support the same function definition syntax. So, put a function name in quotes and only Bash will run it, put "exit" in quotes and only Bash will exit. Then write PowerShell code after.

NB. this works because the syntax in both shells overlaps, and your script is simple - run commands and deal with variables. If you try to use more advanced script (if/then, for, switch, case, etc.) for either language, the other one will probably complain.

Save this as dual.ps1 so PowerShell is happy with it, chmod +x dual.ps1 so Bash will run it

#!/bin/bash

function DoBashThings {
    wget http://www.example.org/my.script -O my.script
    # set a couple of environment variables
    export script_source=http://www.example.org
    export some_value=floob
    # now execute the downloaded script
    bash ./my.script
}

"DoBashThings"  # This runs the bash script, in PS it's just a string
"exit"          # This quits the bash version, in PS it's just a string


# PowerShell code here
# --------------------
Invoke-WebRequest "http://www.example.org/my.script.ps1" -OutFile my.script.ps1
$env:script_source="http://www.example.org"
$env:some_value="floob"
PowerShell -File ./my.script.ps1

then

./dual.ps1

on either system.


Edit: You can include more complex code by commenting the code blocks with a distinct prefix, then having each language filter out its own code and eval it (usual security caveats apply with eval), e.g. with this approach (incorporating suggestion from Harry Johnston ):

#!/bin/bash

#posh $num = 200
#posh if (150 -lt $num) {
#posh   write-host "PowerShell here"
#posh }

#bash thing="xyz"
#bash if [ "$thing" = "xyz" ]
#bash then
#bash echo "Bash here"
#bash fi

function RunBashStuff {
    eval "$(grep '^#bash' $0 | sed -e 's/^#bash //')"
}

"RunBashStuff"
"exit"

((Get-Content $MyInvocation.MyCommand.Source) -match '^#posh' -replace '^#posh ') -join "`n" | Invoke-Expression
  • 1
    Could you combine the two solutions by putting the eval statement into a function block so that only bash runs it? – Harry Johnston Sep 11 '16 at 1:17
  • @HarryJohnston I retried the second script and it didn't even work because I'd broken the quoting in eval. Yes, great idea to combine the two approaches - and that even fixes the reason I changed the quoting so it works even better - thanks. (PowerShell was trying to evaluate the "$(eval)" and complaining - but it doesn't do that when it's inside a function that doesn't get called). – TessellatingHeckler Sep 11 '16 at 2:37

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.