3

I have the following linq query

internal List<ZipCodeInfo> GetInfoFromZipCode(string zipCode)
{
    using (DbContext context = new DbContext())
    {
        IQueryable<ZipCodeInfo> results;

        results = (from a in context.Address
                    where a.ZipCode.Equals(zipCode)
                    select new ZipCodeInfo
                    {
                        Field1 = a.Field1,
                        Field2 = a.Field2,
                        Field3 = a.Field3
                    });

        return results.ToList();
    }
}

But the query itself takes around 5-6 seconds to be completed. I've executed the counterpart query on SQL and it takes almost nothing to complete. Why is it taking that long? The query at the end just returns 4 matches so there is not that much to do here..

This query is part of a Controller class and I am using ASP.NET Core and EntityFramework Core.

The SQL query looks like this, btw.

SELECT *
FROM Address
WHERE ZipCode = '29130'
  • The reason is sometime L2S or entity framework doesn't emit optimized query. The execution path is not great always. The alternative for you is to create a stored procedure and call it using entity framework. Let me know if you need the complete solution. – Pratik Gaikwad Sep 10 '16 at 2:06
  • You mean a store procedure in the db? Unfortunately, I have no control on the db, just read access to run queries and adding a store procedure is not an option. Any idea if there is any other way? Maybe I need to get rid of EF and use a regular SQL connection? – user3587624 Sep 10 '16 at 2:15
  • The reason is simple as to why it's taking time. Every time you are calling the function EF is going to create SQL script and compile. So it would always take time. Let me think for an alternative. But meanwhile can you go old school and try ADO for this function only? – Pratik Gaikwad Sep 10 '16 at 2:18
  • Is ZipCode a nvarchar or varchar? – Robert McKee Sep 10 '16 at 5:30
  • The db has defined ZipCode as a varchar – user3587624 Sep 11 '16 at 16:57
1

You can rewrite above query as shown below.Please let us know about the performance now.

 internal List<ZipCodeInfo> GetInfoFromZipCode(string zipCode)
    {
        using (DbContext context = new DbContext())
        {
           //disabled tracking
           context.ChangeTracker.QueryTrackingBehavior = QueryTrackingBehavior.NoTracking;

            IQueryable<ZipCodeInfo> results;

            results = (from a in context.Address
                        where a.ZipCode.Equals(zipCode)
                        select new ZipCodeInfo
                        {
                            Field1 = a.Field1,
                            Field2 = a.Field2,
                            Field3 = a.Field3
                        });

            return results.ToList();
     }
    }
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    LazyLoading is not an option on EntityFramework Core so I can't desable it at all – user3587624 Sep 11 '16 at 16:56
  • Yes,then what about with AsNoTracking() ? any improvement ? – Sampath Sep 11 '16 at 17:12
  • AsNoTracking() is not an option on EF Core either :( – user3587624 Sep 11 '16 at 17:30
  • What ? did you use it correctly ? please see this : jessedotnet.com/2016/03/17/… – Sampath Sep 11 '16 at 17:34
  • 1
    I does improve the performance a bit but not that much. Seems like there is not too much to do at this point with the current EF Core so I will accept your suggestion as valid :). However, I will implement my own SQL Connection class and do this particular query avoiding EF since performance is not great for this particular case. Thanks! – user3587624 Sep 11 '16 at 18:09
0

I don't know what version of .Net and entity frameworks are you using, but I found an interesting article here on MSDN. You can go through it. But code can be used as below:

static readonly Func<DbEntities, IQueryable<ZipCodeInfo>> s_compiledQuery2 = 
CompiledQuery.Compile<DbEntities, IQueryable<ZipCodeInfo>>(
(ctx, total) => from a in context.Address
                where a != null and a != "" 
                a.ZipCode.ToUpper().Equals(zipCode.ToUpper())
                select new ZipCodeInfo
                {
                    Field1 = a.Field1,
                    Field2 = a.Field2,
                    Field3 = a.Field3
                });

internal List<ZipCodeInfo> GetInfoFromZipCode(string zipCode)
{            
     using (DbEntities context = new DbEntities())
     {
          IQueryable<ZipCodeInfo> zipCodes = s_compiledQuery2.Invoke(context, zipCode);
          return zipCodes.ToList();
     }            
}

At this point I don't have any remote database to test but again delay to fetch the result of these kind of query will also depends on N\W and number of records being fetched. You can try this solution.

| improve this answer | |
  • I tried this option but the CompiledQuery class is not available on ASP.NET Core – user3587624 Sep 11 '16 at 16:56

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